Chi Running/Running meditation

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Dark Night Yogi, modified 11 Years ago at 10/7/10 11:55 AM
Created 11 Years ago at 10/7/10 11:52 AM

Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 138 Join Date: 8/25/09 Recent Posts
Hello. About 3 weeks ago I tried Chi running/running meditation. Its amazing.
Before that, i used to do stationary bike and workout for exercise but running stimulates chi in a way that biking doesn't really do..

it can truly be 2 birds with one stone. in a way it is better than sitting becoz it really gets your energy and metabolism flowing, and you can take that to your walking and to your everyday activities. sort of like has a Yoga aftereffect. Havn't felt this good in ages.

If i run closing my eyes (w/c isn't that difficult if you run in an oval or straight-away with no cars.) i can really run effortlessly and fast. I just let go, and the effect kinda works in real-time. For me, this is a big-time way to integrate the fruits of meditation to real life practices. I am now optimistic into bringing my running into a new level bcoz of chi/meditative running that would compete with athletes who are way more fit and experienced than me.

becoz we can get our energy from the source, or close to the source, we can really walk or run great distances, mind over matter all the way.
Christoffer S, modified 11 Years ago at 10/9/10 11:51 AM
Created 11 Years ago at 10/9/10 11:51 AM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 4 Join Date: 9/25/10 Recent Posts
Link to the method?
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Dark Night Yogi, modified 11 Years ago at 10/10/10 11:08 AM
Created 11 Years ago at 10/10/10 11:08 AM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 138 Join Date: 8/25/09 Recent Posts
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8egf6aXgH0&feature=related

here's one.
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Dark Night Yogi, modified 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 3:27 AM
Created 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 3:27 AM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 138 Join Date: 8/25/09 Recent Posts
hello guys, resurrecting this topic.. an update on my practice,

i have taken a resolution this year to focus on running. i tried it last october but didn't really go hardcore or anything.. and in the true spirit of hardcore meditation practice, im aiming to take my running to another lvl this year.

Running + Meditation + Meditation experience (paths, samadhi, knowing how to flow) + raw food (just about 50% for me) work well together, Another thing is, i've stopped meditating.. I've lost my discipline to sit still and found it a drag, and over-all very sedentary, sleepifying, lazifying, really lost motivation for it..

i've set myself off with a goal, something to prove to myself and to the naysayers, or possibly even stir up curiosity or interest about dharma practice as well.. I'm training myself now to get more athletic, build speed, muscle, do the normal distances, but later on when my body is ready, i plan on ultramarathons, in the spirit of emulating a vipassana retreat running!
I don't think this sounds insane or even super-tough.. It just fits all together perfectly.
-

Any other runners out there?
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J Groove, modified 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 6:25 AM
Created 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 6:20 AM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 59 Join Date: 9/9/09 Recent Posts
I use the Chi running method. Last year, I read Born to Run and resolved to ramp up my running, learn an effective technique that would reduce injuries and possibly even get into the Vibrams and the whole barefoot running thing. However, along the way I ran into the concept of "chronic cardio" and its negative effects. I changed course (no pun intended) as a result.

I read a book called The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson, a former triathlete who feels that he wrecked his health, at least for a time, through years of excessive cardio. By putting yourself in this state of stress, day after day, where your heart-rate gets up really high, you end up having elevated cortisol levels (which translates into problems like sleep difficulties and insulin-resistance), lots of injuries and, if you're really hardcore about running, an emaciated body that is suited for only one thing: running. Try to do any other form of exercise, such as sports that require lifting, agility, balance, etc., and you're toast.

What I'm doing now is wearing a heart-rate monitor and trying to get in two hours of low-level cardio per week--never exceeding 75 percent of my max heart-rate. I'll walk in the neighborhood and then run, Chi running style, about 20 or 30 steps until my heart rate gets up to 75 percent of max, then I'll stop for a minute or two until the heart rate gets back down. Rinse and repeat. The idea here is that you stay in fat-burning range and don't end up burning up your muscle tissue. (I've lost 23 pounds over the past few months following the paleo diet.) In Sisson's approach, you do sprints once a week, and then you do tons of weight training and try to find fun sports and recreational activities that keep you active and outside. You avoid chronic cardio as much as possible.

My sister, a former marathon runner, is totally depressed now because she blew out her knee. My marathon-running brother-in-law has gained 15 pounds and can't understand why he can't ditch the weight. He doesn't realize that all of that overtraining simply made him extremely hungry as well as insulin-resistant. Anyway, more power to you if you want to ramp up the running. I thought I'd share this view about the dangers of excessive cardio, for whatever it might be worth.

EDIT: I should add that one question I have is whether, by using the Chi running method and continuing with the low-intensity, high-volume approach, I'll be able to stay relaxed enough and build a big enough cardio base, to actually go out and run distances without elevating my heart rate. My guess is that Danny Dreyer isn't exactly in a state of stress on his runs...
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Dark Night Yogi, modified 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 1:47 PM
Created 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 1:47 PM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 138 Join Date: 8/25/09 Recent Posts
J Groove:
I use the Chi running method. Last year, I read Born to Run and resolved to ramp up my running, learn an effective technique that would reduce injuries and possibly even get into the Vibrams and the whole barefoot running thing. However, along the way I ran into the concept of "chronic cardio" and its negative effects. I changed course (no pun intended) as a result.

read on chronic cardio.. scary sounding, but i think it says the way around it is just to mix it up.. with running or any sport, mix up the intensity.. chi running works for slow and also for fast. You can even do chi sprinting. Weight training seems to be another important thing. Im starting my weight training too, and cross-training with other athletic activities. The running habit also makes the motivation for weights or other athletic activities easier.

I read a book called The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson, a former triathlete who feels that he wrecked his health, at least for a time, through years of excessive cardio. By putting yourself in this state of stress, day after day, where your heart-rate gets up really high, you end up having elevated cortisol levels (which translates into problems like sleep difficulties and insulin-resistance), lots of injuries and, if you're really hardcore about running, an emaciated body that is suited for only one thing: running. Try to do any other form of exercise, such as sports that require lifting, agility, balance, etc., and you're toast.

dean karnazas is an athlete im taking as a model and an example. check out his body, bigger than the cliche runners. Hes a bit slower.. but he doesn't get injured coz of his build and he cross trains, he does alot of other sports.
Perhaps the case of Mark Sisson was one of the rarer ones? I don't hear much about that but ill google that.. havnt yet


What I'm doing now is wearing a heart-rate monitor and trying to get in two hours of low-level cardio per week--never exceeding 75 percent of my max heart-rate. I'll walk in the neighborhood and then run, Chi running style, about 20 or 30 steps until my heart rate gets up to 75 percent of max, then I'll stop for a minute or two until the heart rate gets back down. Rinse and repeat. The idea here is that you stay in fat-burning range and don't end up burning up your muscle tissue. (I've lost 23 pounds over the past few months following the paleo diet.) In Sisson's approach, you do sprints once a week, and then you do tons of weight training and try to find fun sports and recreational activities that keep you active and outside. You avoid chronic cardio as much as possible.

nice approach, very safe sounding. ill google Sisson. hey congrats on the 23 pnds! i can train for 5 hours.. but losing weight..keeping it off *scratches head*.. tougher banana. hopefully gradual all gradual and safe..

My sister, a former marathon runner, is totally depressed now because she blew out her knee. My marathon-running brother-in-law has gained 15 pounds and can't understand why he can't ditch the weight. He doesn't realize that all of that overtraining simply made him extremely hungry as well as insulin-resistant. Anyway, more power to you if you want to ramp up the running. I thought I'd share this view about the dangers of excessive cardio, for whatever it might be worth.

maybe their program is not right..

EDIT: I should add that one question I have is whether, by using the Chi running method and continuing with the low-intensity, high-volume approach, I'll be able to stay relaxed enough and build a big enough cardio base, to actually go out and run distances without elevating my heart rate. My guess is that Danny Dreyer isn't exactly in a state of stress on his runs...


i was told that Dean Karnazes the longdistance ultra runner has a really low resting heart rate..
The thing with doing high intensity is that it increases your capacity.. i noticed this benefit after i do my fast paced runs.. lets say, after that i do a workout that i would normally do before and get tired from, now its like i get to beat up all my muscles but still not be tired from exhaustion.. so it increases the threshold of getting tired.. i would say my heart isnt needing to work that hard.. so u can only do that by going over that safe zone.. so really make the 1x/week sprints real hardcore?..
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Dark Night Yogi, modified 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 2:18 PM
Created 11 Years ago at 1/22/11 2:18 PM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 138 Join Date: 8/25/09 Recent Posts
paleo is pretty hardcore! no carbs? way to go.
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Kevin Andrew, modified 11 Years ago at 1/23/11 10:25 PM
Created 11 Years ago at 1/23/11 10:25 PM

RE: Chi Running/Running meditation

Posts: 23 Join Date: 5/6/10 Recent Posts
Running is great! I've often thought that jogging should be mandatory for prisoners and/or 'mental' patients because of the positive effects on mood and outlook that come from it. Not likely to happen though...

I've (over-)trained for 10k and marathon distances so I have some experience on what does and doesn't work, at least for me. I agree with JG about heart-monitors. I recommend getting one and using the target heart-rate technique; just Google it. I get far better return for effort using a monitor; faster recovery, greater gains, better experience overall. If you want to mix it up then add some hill running to gain strength and get over the plateaus that inevitably come as your training advances. Cross-training is a good idea too. Also look into proper running technique, that's really all they were talking about in the youtube video. Heel-strike bad, mid-foot landing good! Notice the way he was running in the first part of the video when he was running like a kid. Do that at every pace and you will be better for it. It does take some practise to get there; most people don't realize how hard they walk on their heels. Modern shoes encourage heel-strike with all the padding and that doesn't allow our normal bio-mechanics to operate the way they were meant to.

As far as getting to the 'effortless' part, I found it took a surprisingly large amount of practise to get the technique down to the point where I was no longer trying to get it right but just watching that I was doing it correctly. By this I mean hitting a target heart-rate and running with correct posture and foot-fall consistently. Running done wrong is easy and usually leads to injury. Trouble is injury usually comes slowly so it's best to spend the time checking your technique up front before one day your knee goes or your achilles barks at you or your feet start to throb and don't stop.

80% of my training is 'target heart-rate'. Initially the gains seem slow but they last and build momentum. It took me about a year to get my technique down but the benefits are worth it. I'm in my 40s and can't afford any more injuries! My weight is up (no scrawny runner physique from over-training) but consistent, I'm stronger and some nagging injuries from years gone by are slowly resolving due to better technique and massage.

As far a concentration practises, I find that in order to run correctly you cannot be thinking of anything else like the days' issues, current events, etc. I find it best not to think in terms of a goal like speed or distance and concentrate on foot-fall and posture and perhaps breathing. The monitor is to keep tabs on heart-rate. Far from being passive I find that correct running requires that you be fully engaged with what is happening now (...just this stride...) and when done with the greatest skill does appear and feel effortless, but very focused.

Stretching is also important and a good transition into and out of running. Stretching is a good way to try and establish mindfulness as you limber up before and cool down after. Like running you must use good technique when stretching, otherwise you can do more harm than good, and good technique requires concentration. Google stretching and you may be surprised to see that what they showed you in school may actually be bad for you (...or not. What I was shown in gym-class appears on most 'Don't' lists!) Don't think 'Well I don't feel tight, so I don't really need to stretch...' because like other running injuries a lack of flexibility creeps up on you and will make you pay later.

My 2c...

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