RE: BEWARE: Heavy Thinking Ahead 2

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Angel Roberto Puente, modified 5 Days ago.

BEWARE: Heavy Thinking Ahead 2

Posts: 189 Join Date: 5/5/19 Recent Posts
On Chris's suggestion, I've started a continuation of this thread.  Without the comment tree we had before, the "more messages" button has to be used continuously. Despite the heavy thinking, I didn't know what to do. I suppose this is the only solution for now. After all, Chris knows best, ( just like Papa).
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Chris Marti, modified 5 Days ago.

RE: BEWARE: Heavy Thinking Ahead 2

Posts: 3845 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
Someone, hopefully, is busy thinking heavily about how to fix the DhO's "More Messages" conundrum.

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Angel Roberto Puente, modified 4 Days ago.

RE: BEWARE: Heavy Thinking Ahead 2

Posts: 189 Join Date: 5/5/19 Recent Posts
This is a recap of the last entries to the previous thread:

 How does a particular form of practice become dominant and established as a “lineage”? Even in recent times, the view of one man has been enough to create a whole new school of practice. Probably, the offer of results that are sought after, and the enticement of quick results have a lot to do with the growth and permanence of these schools. Some of the older cases of this phenomenon have persisted for centuries. Die-hard enthusiasts of any particular school keep the flame alive, sometimes downplaying the evident failures in morality and outright despicable behavior of the founder. These schools become closed loops where the sanctioning of “experiences” has to come from within the hierarchy, perpetuating a dedicated and loyal following.      Recent scientific studies suggest that the functioning of individual brains are, like fingerprints, unique.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCymeuQECOs Also, that the technique used in practice leaves a distinctive neural pattern that is distinguishable from others. It may be too early to know how this information will be applied but it has been suggested that it can be used to tailor practices suitable for particular types of brain functioning. I suppose it can also be used to weed out practices that cause ill effects in the brain, such as those that have been reported with some of the newer modalities (lineages) that are spreading.

​​​​​​​     Just food for thought.

Pepe: 
Shinzen Young speculates that AI would be the great breakthrough (at least regarding concentration), as its software would detect the specifics of each brain and so be the Zen monk with the stick in hand ready to remind you to get back to your object of preference.  

Angel:
There's no doubt that technology will play a big role in the future dissemination of meditation. The proliferation of apps is a sign of what will come. As more information about the workings of the brain is available, machines will probably be devised that can take a reading of individuals and recommend a suitable practice. There's already a precedent for such interventions with the use of the EEG machines that started being used in meditation studies in the 1960's https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnsys.2020.00053/full.     The more problematic issue, that I see, is that the push is to eventually medicalize meditation. As touched on in the article I posted above (Robert Shaff), What will be the result of removing practices from the religious context in which they were created? How will you explain, or put in context, the experiences that are sure to occur?  We'll see.
George S:
I don't think that medicine is necessarily a more problematic context for meditation than religion. For every fault I can find with medicine, I can find an equally compelling fault with religion!
Angel:
I agree that religion has caused its own set of problems. Especially in the authoritarianism and secretiveness that Pragmatic Dharma rebels against.  I much prefer a scientific approach to practice.  But the problem remains, that the insights have to be put in a cohesive context, otherwise the problems that can arise will not be properly addressed.  The "spiritual" emergencies are real and psychology is not broadly prepared to handle them. There is also concern about the role ethics will take in this new situation.  But, at the moment, it's just wait-and-see. 

The question is open, What's the future of meditation?​​​​​​​
George S, modified 4 Days ago.

RE: BEWARE: Heavy Thinking Ahead 2

Posts: 1488 Join Date: 2/26/19 Recent Posts
This article says that 14% of American adults had tried meditation in 2017, up from 4% in 2012. 

I did a google trends search on "meditation" which showed a similar trend (and interestingly "buddhism" dropped over the same period)


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Angel Roberto Puente, modified 4 Days ago.

RE: BEWARE: Heavy Thinking Ahead 2

Posts: 189 Join Date: 5/5/19 Recent Posts
It's interesting to see that the secularization of meditation moves it away from exclusive identification with Buddhism. Also that there is a kind of lumping together of different modalities:The CDC survey considered meditation to be “the act of engaging in mental exercise to reach a heightened level of spiritual awareness or mindfulness.” This could include: transcendental meditation or other forms of mantra meditation; mindfulness meditation, such as Zen Buddhist meditation or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy; and spiritual meditation based on prayer or other contemplative thoughts.” Surprise! The CDC involved with meditation? The study was done in 2017, I bet the numbers are higher now. Especially with people trying to cope with the effects of the pandemic.

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