Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

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Joshua T, modified 8 Years ago.

Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 30 Join Date: 6/6/12 Recent Posts
I feel that I should find a teacher. I'd be open to working with someone online. I'm currently in the process of looking for a job as a post secondary math teacher, so I would be open to looking for jobs near a teacher that lived in the United States.

I would like to use noting practice to hit stream entry.

I'm not entirely sure what I want out of the Vipassana student/teacher relationship, but my understanding is that having a teacher can be very helpful to progress. I could use help with motivation these days. I've been lazy.

Here are some locations that I have found so far, but I haven't found a place to teach near them.
Ven. U Indeka ( Dhammasariya Paliparagu, B.A. Religion U.S.A. )
619 Bergen Street
Brooklyn, NY 11238

63 Gordons Corner Road
Manalapan, NJ 07726
Tel: (732) 446-1552

Ven. U Silananda (Aggamaha Pandita)
17450 South Callibro Hwy
Half Moon Bay, CA 94014
Tel: (415) 726-7604

Jetavana Vihara Ky Vien Tu Ven. U Khippa Panno
1400 Madison 86 N.W.
Washington DC 20015
Tel: (202) 882-6054
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Joshua T, modified 8 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 30 Join Date: 6/6/12 Recent Posts
Iowa, Oregon, and possibly Florida are my default choices, if anyone knows of a teacher in those locations.
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Adam S, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Post: 1 Join Date: 7/24/13 Recent Posts
Aduro T:
I'd be open to working with someone online.


Shinzen young teaches Mahasi-style Vipassana. He is pretty good about replying to emails and also does skype/phone retreats, though I've never tried it. Good luck.
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Dream Walker, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 1312 Join Date: 1/18/12 Recent Posts
You might look here too - Kenneth Folk list of teachers
Good luck,
~D
ju ju, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 3 Join Date: 7/26/13 Recent Posts
Buddha said using jhanas correctly were the key to enlightenment. Are you sure you want to arbitrarily avoid them as is the vogue?
Russell ., modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 92 Join Date: 10/19/11 Recent Posts
ju ju:
Buddha said using jhanas correctly were the key to enlightenment. Are you sure you want to arbitrarily avoid them as is the vogue?


He also said do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.
Robert McLune, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 255 Join Date: 9/8/12 Recent Posts
Russell .:
ju ju:
Buddha said using jhanas correctly were the key to enlightenment.

He also said do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.

Yeah but he also said not to believe in anything simply because you have heard it. (Ba-dum-tish! emoticon)
Robert McLune, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 255 Join Date: 9/8/12 Recent Posts
ju ju:
Buddha said using jhanas correctly were the key to enlightenment. Are you sure you want to arbitrarily avoid them as is the vogue?

Where did Aduro say he(?) was avoiding jhanas? Is it because he mentioned noting (and does that imply avoiding jhanas)?
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Daniel M. Ingram, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 3167 Join Date: 4/20/09 Recent Posts
Defining the term "jhana" further might help.

You see, there are jhanas and there are jhanas, and you can do various things with them, and they can vary a lot in their quality.

The stages of insight are clearly jhanic in some way.

Basically everyone who notes well is going to get into some jhanic states of some kind if they do it well.

Maintaining perfectly "jhana-free" practice is not only basically impossible past some point, but also not as much fun.

Even in the Mahasi tradition, they teach and practice jhanas at the higher levels and are totally expecting jhanic effects of various kinds even in "pure noters".
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Fitter Stoke, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: Looking for a teacher in Vipassana Mahasi Tradition

Posts: 489 Join Date: 1/23/12 Recent Posts
Daniel M. Ingram:
Defining the term "jhana" further might help.

You see, there are jhanas and there are jhanas, and you can do various things with them, and they can vary a lot in their quality.

The stages of insight are clearly jhanic in some way.

Basically everyone who notes well is going to get into some jhanic states of some kind if they do it well.

Maintaining perfectly "jhana-free" practice is not only basically impossible past some point, but also not as much fun.

Even in the Mahasi tradition, they teach and practice jhanas at the higher levels and are totally expecting jhanic effects of various kinds even in "pure noters".


This is such a valuable, interesting, and useful point that I would recommend putting it front and center in your revisions to MCTB. It is high time we got past this confusion of "Should I practice jhana, or should I practice vipassana?" Some really excellent scholarship on the Pali suttas (see Bhante Sujato or Thannisaro Bhikkhu) shows that this distinction between jhana and vipassana is a false one, and the Buddha fully expected his students to bring both tranquility and insight to bear on phenomena in every sit. So it would be great if you could help add to the clarification by softening this distinction in the next version of your book.