Mindfulness verus Bare Attention

Steve Anonymous, modified 6 Years ago.

Mindfulness verus Bare Attention

Posts: 8 Join Date: 3/8/13 Recent Posts
I always thought mindfulness was giving something your full attention and doing so without making evaluations of any kind.  Just watching.

I've heard people call that "bare attention".   

I also recally an essay by Thanisarro Bhikkhu claiming that most people use the word "mindfulness" incorrectly, but I never understood what he meant by it.

How is mindfulness different from bare attention?

Thanks.
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Chris J Macie, modified 6 Years ago.

RE: Mindfulness verus Bare Attention

Posts: 863 Join Date: 8/17/14 Recent Posts
Steve Anonymous:
I always thought mindfulness was giving something your full attention and doing so without making evaluations of any kind.  Just watching.

I've heard people call that "bare attention".   

I also recally an essay by Thanisarro Bhikkhu claiming that most people use the word "mindfulness" incorrectly, but I never understood what he meant by it.

How is mindfulness different from bare attention?

Thanks.
Is this question much different than the issues aired-out recently in the thread "Sati and Memory"?

http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/5637528
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Psi, modified 6 Years ago.

RE: Mindfulness verus Bare Attention

Posts: 1093 Join Date: 11/22/13 Recent Posts
Steve Anonymous:
I always thought mindfulness was giving something your full attention and doing so without making evaluations of any kind.  Just watching.

I've heard people call that "bare attention".   

I also recally an essay by Thanisarro Bhikkhu claiming that most people use the word "mindfulness" incorrectly, but I never understood what he meant by it.

How is mindfulness different from bare attention?

Thanks.


Mindfulness, Bare Attention, and Sati  are all  synonomous.  Three terms, same concept.

Excerpt from link:

http://www.vipassana.com/meditation/mindfulness_in_plain_english_15.php
Mindfulness is nonconceptual awareness. Another English term for Sati is 'bare attention'. It is not thinking. It does not get involved with thought or concepts. It does not get hung up on ideas or opinions or memories. It just looks. Mindfulness registers experiences, but it does not compare them. It does not label them or categorize them. It just observes everything as if it was occurring for the first time. It is not analysis which is based on reflection and memory. It is, rather, the direct and immediate experiencing of whatever is happening, without the medium of thought. It comes before thought in the perceptual process.Mindfulness is present time awareness. It takes place in the here and now. It is the observance of what is happening right now, in the present moment. It stays forever in the present, surging perpetually on the crest of the ongoing wave of passing time. If you are remembering your second-grade teacher, that is memory. When you then become aware that you are remembering your second-grade teacher, that is mindfulness. If you then conceptualize the process and say to yourself, "Oh, I am remembering", that is thinking.Mindfulness is non-egoistic alertness. It takes place without reference to self. With Mindfulness one sees all phenomena without references to concepts like 'me', 'my' or 'mine'. For example, suppose there is pain in your left leg. Ordinary consciousness would say, "I have a pain." Using Mindfulness, one would simply note the sensation as a sensation. One would not tack on that extra concept 'I'. Mindfulness stops one from adding anything to perception, or subtracting anything from it. One does not enhance anything. One does not emphasize anything. One just observes exactly what is there - without distortion.


Also:

excerpt from link


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nyanaponika/wheel121.html

In ordinary life, if mindfulness, or attention, is directed to any object, it is rarely sustained long enough for the purpose of careful and factual observation. Generally it is followed immediately by emotional reaction, discriminative thought, reflection, or purposeful action. In a life and thought governed by the Buddha's teaching too, mindfulness (sati) is mostly linked with clear comprehension (sampajañña) of the right purpose or suitability of an action, and other considerations. Thus again it is not viewed in itself. But to tap the actual and potential power of mindfulness it is necessary to understand and deliberately cultivate it in its basic, unalloyed form, which we shall call bare attention.By bare attention we understand the clear and single-minded awareness of what actually happens to us and in us, at the successive moments of perception. It is called "bare" because it attends to the bare facts of a perception without reacting to them by deed, speech or mental comment. Ordinarily, that purely receptive state of mind is, as we said, just a very brief phase of the thought process of which one is often scarcely aware. But in the methodical development of mindfulness aimed at the unfolding of its latent powers, bare attention is sustained for as long a time as one's strength of concentration permits. Bare attention then becomes the key to the meditative practice of satipatthana, opening the door to mind's mastery and final liberation.

Psi

Ahhhh!  Dreaded quote box function, lol  

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