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Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?

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Have you ever wished there was a relatively short primer that you could show someone when they're confused as to why you're so obsessed with meditation? Something shorter than a book but longer than a newspaper article, like maybe a longform magazine article or a documentary. Does something like that exist? I'm thinking it would assume the reader/viewer has zero knowledge of buddhism or meditation, and I'm hoping it would come from a pragmatic dharma perspective, so doesn't focus as much on the history or religious Buddhism (except where appropriate to give context and make clear distinctions). What I'm looking for would explain most or all of the following:

- why would anyone want to meditate? what are the benefits? how can it change your life?
- what is meditation? basic instructions
- the difference between concentraion and insight
- the 3 characteristics
- the difference between retreat and daily practice,
- what retreats are actually like and why. 
- the progress of insight (making sure not to shy away from talking about the dark night) 
- the brain science behind meditiation and enlightenment, espeically the "default" vs task networks in the brain
- what enlightenment is, what the experience of it is really like, why enlightened people can still be jerks and get sad
- addresses some FAQs and dispells some common myths. 

Maybe that's too much to ask for the length of media that I'm talking about. I know it would still probably raise more questions than it answers, but the idea is to give the audience the general lay of the land. If you know of something like that, please post a link!

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/18/15 3:56 PM as a reply to Matt Lorean.
Here's two articles that start to come close to what I'm looking for, but still aren't quite there:

This Wired article is what got me into pragmatic dharma, but it's mainly focused on the Silicon Valley scene, and there's not much about what it's actually like to be a meditator.

Here's an article from the New York Times about a guy who did a one-month retreat with Daniel. 

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/18/15 4:01 PM as a reply to Matt Lorean.
The Wired article is what got me hunting for MCTB in the first place, so it has a special place in my heart. The NYT article is good. Also you might consider any of the book reviews for Dan Harris' book "10% Happier". 

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/20/15 8:03 AM as a reply to Matt Lorean.
I think one question that comes up is what should be included to introduce new people to meditation. I would leave the following to present to people already having a long time daily meditation practice.

- the difference between retreat and daily practice,
- what retreats are actually like and why. 
- the progress of insight (making sure not to shy away from talking about the dark night) 
- what enlightenment is, what the experience of it is really like, why enlightened people can still be jerks and get sad

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/20/15 5:25 PM as a reply to Matt Lorean.
I think the thing that is most obvious to me when explaining it to outsiders are the mental health ramifications:

I have bipolar disorder, and have done plenty of work with therapists and shrinks, which has worked well within the boundaries of what is possible.  But the only thing that has helped to cure my baseline restlessness is completing cycles of insight.

So, to keep it super simple:  I was really, really bipolar.  Now I'm just Bipolar.  Eventually, I'll be sort of Bipolar, and then, not at all.  

Kenneth Folk had chronic depression dissappear at 4th Path.  My teacher, Ron Crouch, has witnessed students be cured of conditions such as chronic anxiety at 4th Path.  Other times, mental health conditions do not simply vanish, but they become 100x more workable, rendering them basically ineffective.

There are things that spiritual insight can do to the mind that can't be done through conventional insight and biochemical balancing.

So, if spiritual practice can do this to an imbalanced mind, imagine what it can do for an already conventionally healthy one?  I think its a pretty sound arguement.  (Plus everyone's secretely screwed up in their own ways.)

Usually, when I explain it to people this way, they are attracted to it, whether or not they think they need help.

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/21/15 4:48 PM as a reply to Matt Lorean.
Mindfulness In Plain English is the book I always recommend. It's no article, but it's an easy read, and the very first chapter gives a pretty convincing picture of why someone would want to meditate. Convinced me, at least. 
-very clear instructions
-mentions jhana, mentions nibbana
-mentions the three characteristics
-includes the progress of insight, but only implicitly

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/21/15 5:49 PM as a reply to Noah.
Thanks for sharing your experience Noah.

Noah S:

...
There are things that spiritual insight can do to the mind that can't be done through conventional insight and biochemical balancing.
...


From my own limited experience, I've thought the same thing.

RE: Best short introduction to meditation for the general public?
Answer
5/21/15 5:54 PM as a reply to Paul Kinkade.
I'd second Mindfulnessin Plain English.  It's what I recommend to people when I'm asked about meditation.