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Dependnt origination big bang

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Dependnt origination big bang
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6/26/15 12:16 AM
Bloke says - http://dharmawisdom.org/blogs/psychology-and-buddhism/computing-early-universe-and-dependent-origination

"According to this theory, all manifested phenomena (including the ever-shifting mindscape of cognitive, affective, physical and energetic material we process and mistakenly perceive as self-existing ego/body/world) is conditioned from its inception and co-emergent with all other simultaneously existent phenomena. Dependent Origination postulates that nothing exists separately. All internal and external phenomena are simultaneously networked, dependent and resultant."

So, that rules out our idea of a Big Bang because it's supposed to be a single causational event ?

RE: Dependnt origination big bang
Answer
6/26/15 11:32 AM as a reply to Stick Man.
I read the material in that link. I think that person is seriously stretching his metaphors. It's like saying ice is like metal because they're both solid when at zero degress fahrenheit. Well, yes, they are indeed both solid at that temperature - and we'll conventiently ignore all the differences that are far more important.

emoticon

RE: Dependnt origination big bang
Answer
6/27/15 3:42 AM as a reply to Chris Marti.
Chris Marti:
I read the material in that link. I think that person is seriously stretching his metaphors. It's like saying ice is like metal because they're both solid when at zero degress fahrenheit. Well, yes, they are indeed both solid at that temperature - and we'll conventiently ignore all the differences that are far more important.

emoticon

OK. How does the endeavour of reductionism - finding smaller and smaller particles - fit with buddhism ?

Says here http://rational-buddhism.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/buddhism-quantum-physics-and-mind.html

(1)  Particles are not
inherently existent. No particle is 'a thing in itself' with a
self-contained identity.   An inherently-existent particle would be
indestructible, unitary and indivisible.

(2)  Particles are not causeless.

(3)  Particles are not partless, they do not exist as indivisible points.

(4)  Particles are not  'permanent' in the sense of having a unchanging, static identity.

(5)  Particles exist by interaction with the mind of an observer.

I suppose the buddhist view is that the process of dividing particles must go on forever, an infinite process, because finding a fundamental, indivisible particle is finding something imperishable and permanent and possibly causal ?

But is not treating particles as waves also another way of finding something essential and permanent - a ground of being for particles ?
I mean, I was looking up sutta accounts of budddha's attitude to brahma last night and I would guess that would apply to any undefined wave too - impermanent, unreal and not the ultimate ?

RE: Dependnt origination big bang
Answer
6/27/15 12:43 PM as a reply to Stick Man.
I don't think that any of that matters to Buddhism.