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Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?

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Is it possible without sitting meditation? Nimitta is pre requisite, isn't it?

My daily practice. 

1, 60 mins of walking meditation 
2. Try to stay in here and now as long as I awake no matter what I do , be it driving, eating, working etc.


Thx !!

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/6/15 12:28 PM as a reply to Andy Zain.
IMO, any and all states are likely possible without sitting meditation, as well as seeing Nimitta.  As for if Nimitta being a prerequisite, just like most things in Buddhism (maybe all things?), the varying schools do not agree: https://simplesuttas.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/jhana-wars-pt-6-the-great-nimitta-debate/ .  As an interesting aside, seeing a bright light show in the mind's eye is a commonly reported side effect of kundalini awakening and experiencers do not report the need for specifically being in meditation to see it. 
-Eva

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/6/15 1:51 PM as a reply to Andy Zain.
Andy Zain:
Is it possible without sitting meditation?

Yes, it most certainly is. Even Siddhattha experienced and talked about such in the Majjhima Nikaya (MN 36; translation from the Wisdom Publications edition, trans. Ñanamoli Thera and edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi):

31. "I considered: 'I recall that when my father the Sakyan was occupied, while I was sitting in the cool shade of a rose-apple tree, quite secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, I entered upon and abided in the first jhana, which is accompanied by applied and sustained thought, with rapture and pleasure born of seclusion.[389] Could that be the path to enlightenment?' Then, following on that memory, came the realization: 'That is the path to enlightenment.'
32. "I thought: 'Why am I afraid of that pleasure that has nothing to do with sensual pleasures and unwholesome states?' I thought: 'I am not afraid of that pleasure since it has nothing to do with sensual pleasures and unwholesome states.'[390]

Footnotes
389. MA: During the Bodhisatta's boyhood as a prince, on one occasion his father led a ceremonial ploughing at a traditional festival of the Sakyans. The prince was brought to the festival and a place was prepared for him under a rose-apple tree. When his attendants left him to watch the ploughing ceremony, the prince, finding himself all alone, spontaneously sat up in the meditation posture and attained the first jhana through mindfulness of breathing.

390. This passage marks a change in the Bodhisatta's evaluation of pleasure; now it is no longer regarded as something to be feared and banished by the practice of austerities, but, when born of seclusion and detachment, is seen as a valuable accompaniment of the higher stages along the path to enlightenment. See MN 139.9 on the twofold division of pleasure.


Andy Zain:
Nimitta is pre requisite, isn't it?

Only if you don't know better. A nimitta is only a sign, like a highway sign, to let the practitioner know he is travelling in the right direction. It is certainly not a prerequisite. Yet for inexperienced practitioners, it can be a helpful sign. And nimittas themselves can vary with the practitioner. Some are visual, while others can be sensual (as in a sensation).

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/7/15 12:07 AM as a reply to Andy Zain.
Thx but isn't in jhanas all senses are supressed ? 

All senses are still active while we are awake with eyes open

... so how can a totally awake person enter jhanic states?

I am still a noob in meditation. Pardon me for this seemingly stupid question . 

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/7/15 12:43 PM as a reply to Andy Zain.
Andy Zain:
Thx but isn't in jhanas all senses are supressed ?

If all senses were suppressed, then how would you ever know that you had endered dhyana?  Did you bother to read and carefully consider the quotation from the Majjhima Nikaya above? Did it give you the impression that all the senses of Siddhattha were supressed when he recounted his experience as a child? "...the first jhana, which is accompanied by applied and sustained thought, with rapture and pleasure born of seclusion." Use your head, man, and think!

In the first four dhyanas, known as the rupa-dhyanas (or material dhyanas), the senses are fully active. It is only when going deeper, into the arupa-dhyanas (or immaterial dhyanas) that the mind becomes more refined and sensations can seem to cease. A practitioner won't know this for certain until he experiences sanna-vedeyita-nirodha (or nirodha samapatti) otherwise known as "the cessation of perception and feeling." The latter of which (nirodha samapatti) is said to be "the attainment of cessation" in which is experienced a temporary suspension of mental activities, and is equated with what has been called the "attainment of extinction." But these are much deeper states than the first four dhyanas.

Andy Zain:
All senses are still active while we are awake with eyes open

... so how can a totally awake person enter jhanic states?

The same way that Siddhatta did when he was a child.

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/7/15 4:44 PM as a reply to Ian And.
Ian And:
Andy Zain:
Thx but isn't in jhanas all senses are supressed ?

If all senses were suppressed, then how would you ever know that you had endered dhyana?  Did you bother to read and carefully consider the quotation from the Majjhima Nikaya above? Did it give you the impression that all the senses of Siddhattha were supressed when he recounted his experience as a child? "...the first jhana, which is accompanied by applied and sustained thought, with rapture and pleasure born of seclusion." Use your head, man, and think!
No need to get all crabby about it!  ;-P
-Eva

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/8/15 9:02 AM as a reply to Eva Nie.
Exactly, there is no no need to be angry over trivial matter. Being an newbie in meditation , I asked you this because Ajhan brahm wrote in his book that during jhana even 1st jhana ... senses are supressed. 

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/8/15 9:12 AM as a reply to Andy Zain.
i've read Ajahn Brahm.  i like the story about the wife who called an amulance and had her husband taken to the hospital, thinking something happened to him when he was simply in a really deep jhana.  i've still got Mindfulness, Bliss and Beyond above my desk at work.  But havent thought about it in years.

The debate might relate to the difference between Suttas (scripture) and Vissudimagga (commentary) jhanas, whith the latter being the deeper ones.

please dont take offense to IanAnd's comments.  he's a great poster and you'll find his Jhanna guidance quite helpful.  

I'd post a link but i'm sure you can find it and i gotta get back to work!

Alex 

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/8/15 9:35 AM as a reply to Rednaxela.
This may be the link you are referning to, it is Ian's post that is a sticky in the concentration section:
http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/1191517

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/11/15 6:34 PM as a reply to Andy Zain.
(Addressing various posts here)

It's been touched-upon that there are various interpretations of what "Jhana 1" can mean, which contributes to varying answers to the OP question. I would just note here some aspects in terms of the Visudhimagga (Therevadan) interpretation, which has been quite well spelled-out, at least since the 5th century CE, and is widely practiced today, particularly by the Burmese lineages of the Mahasi and Pa Auk Sayadaws.

1) This sort of (absorptive) jhana is practically possible, at least in early stages of developing it, only in meditative postures of sitting, lying (e.g. in the Parinibbana posture), and perhaps the standing posture; but hardly so in the walking posture or with other physical activity, as the sensory attention and motor activities of would break absorption.

The khanika samadhi ("momentary") form of concentration is not restricted in this way. This is the concentration associated with vipassana activity, for instance in the 4-element (Mahadhatu) practice that can be done in walking (as taught by Mahasi and PaAuk). And, as I confirmed in discussion last week (on retreat) with a monk originally ordained by Mahasi, but who more recently has worked a couple of decades with Pa Auk Sayadaw, the 'vipassana jhana' (as he understands it) is essentially a form of khanika samadhi.

2) In absorption, at least in the rupa jhana-s 1-3, the senses are in a sense "repressed", but not necessarily completely absent from awareness. That is to say, stimuli such as light, sound, etc. can be noticed at a relatively primitive level: in terms of the abdhidhamma 'cognitive series' model, awareness 'adverts to' and 'receives' stimuli, but the mind lets go at that, does not proceed with 'investigation' (researching associations) or 'determining' (identifying or recognizing, naming), let alone the further kammic 'impulsion' and 'registration' mental micro-cycles of the cognitive series.

Experientially (in terms of phenomenal description), it's as if there were a kind of protective but partially translucent shield surrounding the central mental fixation and stillness – the stimuli appear outside of this, as if at a distance, but disperse or bounce off, don't penetrate it to divert the mind into attentive activity.

Phenomenologically (analytically), it can be compared to the psychedelic effect (at a relatively strong dosage) where stimuli appear at the 'bare' stage of reception, but the higher-order neural activities are inhibited -- do not engage to 'make sense' of them, or take any resultant action.

Last week in retreat, I experienced this vividly in a couple of sessions with 4th jhana (by Visudhimagga-type definition), when emerging after 30-40 minutes to notice that the unrinary bladder was sending urgent distress signals and the hip/low-back pain was screaming, whereas these were not at all perceived during the absorption. That is to say, 'pleasure/pain' were absent, in this case not even noticed at the outer edges of the absorptive shield.

To invoke a distinction used s/t in medicine or psychology, in jhana-s 1-3 sensory input is 'repressed' or functionally diminished, but in jhana 4 it is 'suppressed,' virtually inhibited.

3) 'Nimitta' is essential in this form of absorption, though it's form can vary widely, i.e. not necessarily the visual light or other commonly described appearances. That's because the mind in fact, by the one-pointedness on a static or at least relatively constant object (as distinct from one-pointedness on a changing situation as in khanika samadhi), forms a 'counterpart' mental image or representation (nimitta means 'sign') of the object. This is what the mind absorbs into – a mental counterpart -- symbol might be a good word -- of the object. That's a common characteristic of absorption across all the various possible kinds of object – the mind essentially absorbs into itself.

4) A complicating factor, in the Theravadan interpretation, is that, at advanced stages of practice, fully absorptive jhana-s can be entered and exited very rapidly, which is used in applying vipassana to the details of the absorptive experience. Absorptive jhana is experienced, and then analysized immediately afterward, while the mental echo of it, so to speak, is still quite vivid. This leads to 'knowledge' (nyana) of the detailed nature of the experience, as in stages of the 'gradual practice' of the complete 'purification' (visudhi) process. (This kind of practice may be what Sariputta's reputed method, as documented in M 111, refers to.)

So, this is not to deny that "jhana 1", by some other definition, is impossible outside sitting meditation. In fact, the rapid-file (advanced) jhana-vipassana practice can probably be done while physically active; but I wouldn't try it, for instance, while driving in a Formula-I race.

My understanding and expression of all this is, no doubt, not perfect, but is, I believe, fairly accurate, and to some extent experientially (pragmatically) verified.

(Edited for lacking spaces and spelling, 20150711 16:30 PDT)

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/11/15 6:04 PM as a reply to CJMacie.
Chris, an awesome post!

RE: Is it possible to attain Jhana 1 without sitting meditation?
Answer
7/12/15 7:33 AM as a reply to Andy Zain.
I recommend Richard Shankman's "The Experience of Samadhi", which covers the ideas above and related over a whole book. As indicated above, the term "jhana" and what people (and sources) mean by that word, is quite ambiguous and flexible.. the answer to that question pretty much depends on what line of thought/traditional source one adheres to.