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My YouTube Channel Richard Zen 5/23/18 12:21 AM
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My YouTube Channel
Answer
5/23/18 12:21 AM
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKjqfUCABDEd6i8uQZ0BqTA
Psych Reviews

Hello I'm just starting a rough YouTube channel for Psychology, Philosophy, and Meditation book reviews. I hope you enjoy.

Richard 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
8/13/17 11:33 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I saw the other post. I hope the 2nd video is not too quiet. Oh well people can crank it.

Richard

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
8/14/17 1:14 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Cool idea for a channel. 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
8/19/17 6:30 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I just uploaded a Guided Insight Meditation with Pink Noise. Enjoy!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHTJN2AoVUg

...and a meditation bell with pink noise and no voice-over:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdCe7kmX-L0

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
8/22/17 12:27 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I have some good ideas of what I want to review for Psychology books, but for Buddhist books I would appreciate it if anybody here has some requests on what they would like reviewed. Any books that are considered more practical, seminal, or books that have different interpretations of the Dhamma?

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
8/22/17 6:20 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Saints & Psychopaths 
Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree
In This Very Life

id enjoy seeing texts tied to tradition talked about 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
8/22/17 7:06 PM as a reply to Noah D.
Thanks for reminding me of Saints and Psychopaths. That would be perfect for my Narcissist book review series. I remember that. Lots of covert types out there and scandals. I could probably extend that to other religions as well. 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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8/31/17 1:39 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I just uploaded my take on Mahasi noting. I hope you enjoy. Now I'm off to look at Saints and Psychopaths. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OsuiCaTmWE

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
9/17/17 10:39 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I'm still working on Saints and Psychopaths. That almost needs to be in my Narcissism book review playlist but I'll keep it in the comtemplative section.

I just published my experience with trying to heal co-dependency which I briefly posted in my log before. It focuses on the Grey Rock method of dealing with toxic people. I have a sneaky suspicion though that some of you have some interesting techniques with meditation and Buddhism on how to deal with toxic people that psychologists wouldn't know about. I would appreciate any comments on my channel on what worked for you.

https://youtu.be/j42qqS2aEE4
Testimonial - Recovering from Co-dependency and Toxic People - Ross Rosenberg

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
9/18/17 4:07 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Nice, I subbed will check out the videos later.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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9/18/17 7:29 PM as a reply to (D Z) Dhru Val.
Thanks. Later in the year I think I will have more time to create more videos but I only have a dozen right now.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
9/29/17 6:47 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Just added Freud's On Narcissism. Lots of insights here into how self-love can go awry, yet Echo is an example of when self-love is too low. Being in the atheist camp Freud and other Neo-Freudians look at religion as an attempt to bring back the fetal experience when all our needs are met. I'm probably going to have to go back to Nietzsche to see how psychoanalysis and analytical psychology was influenced by him.

https://youtu.be/p5bkxLpQ0Qo
Freud - On Narcissism

My subtitles are in English but I can tell I'll have to start translating into other languages since YouTube is so international. That's a whole pile of work. emoticon

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/3/17 2:03 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
If you are still taking recommendations for books to review. How about mine? emoticonThe Awakened Ape.  It's been on the best seller's list in Buddhism and Theravada for quite some time now. 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/3/17 6:22 PM as a reply to Jinxed P.
Sure, I actually bought that one. 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/5/17 1:04 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Bringing in meditation into your daily life

https://youtu.be/9ESPuWUkjpc

Feel free to comment on methods you use in daily life, since there are so many.

Just finished Saints and Psychopaths. That will be out on the 19th.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/5/17 8:32 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Really enjoyed this review. Thanks, Richard.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/6/17 9:49 PM as a reply to Incandescent Flower.
Incandescent Flower:
Really enjoyed this review. Thanks, Richard.

Thank you. The welcoming meditation in particular really helped me in daily life. There were so many little stresses that were unconscious until I started welcoming more irritants to see how far it was possible to improve my moods.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
10/11/17 8:41 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
https://youtu.be/Lnsfxfy-wS0

Saints and Psychopaths is finished early. It was a fun one to do because of similarities the book has to other books on the cycle of abuse. It's nice to know that evil has a playbook people can read to protect themselves.

Next up is Haiku.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/11/17 9:27 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
https://youtu.be/7J5RPCquQ_I

Haiku - Various Poets

To get the most out of this experience just absorb yourself in the images that your mind naturally creates from the words…

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
10/19/17 8:50 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
https://youtu.be/jhMNMSP_99Q
The False Self

Researching these last books have been helpful to my practice in that I'm checking to see if I'm trying to avoid the impulses in my body in the practice. It questions what a true self is versus a false self. It's like the self is injuring itself based on the internal criticizer but we have to tap into the body so that meditation actually talks to the self-impulses in the body, instead of a ruminating self based on an unrealstic ideal, and then we have to parent ourselves to get that independent feeling of self-love that isn't narcissistic or co-dependent. Tricky balance.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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10/22/17 1:02 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Meditation and Chronic Pain

https://youtu.be/Zz94iw8ElKY

This was fun to research as I had a headache from sleeping the wrong way and I put attention on it to relieve the solidity of the pain down to vibrations, and there was some good relief. It shows the value of locking your attention on detail so you can increase pleasant perceptions to replace contractions on the difficulties. It also is a reminder that we need to be controlling and creating our happiness instead of waiting for the environment to do that for us.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
11/1/17 8:09 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Narcissistic Control

https://youtu.be/FU2QdxwVCuQ

This was hard to do because Narcissism is a part of our culture and Sam Vaknin says that it's an adaptation that works well for the world we are in, yet the heart chakra is dead in them. A recent bump into a Narcissist confirmed that hollow emptiness feeling. They are like dead bodies looking to drain you. When you try to talk to that inner child of theirs it's like talking to a dead body.

The last in the series will be even harder if it's considered mostly incurable. It now seems apparent that narcissism and the pathologcial envy it puts out, can take over institutions and regimes like dictatorships. It's more understandable and any left-wing or right-wing opinions are just the narcissist's way of telling you what to hear so they can take power, because it's all the same in the end for them. Addictive power and control and predatory extrinsic motivation, that's what they want. Without checks and balances they would look at moral rules as jokes.

Anyways, food for thought.

Lots of links to books in this one including some fiction books that look at power and control.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
11/2/17 9:17 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
It now seems apparent that narcissism and the pathologcial envy it puts out, can take over institutions and regimes like dictatorships.
Here's a suggested addition to your reading list: 
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1897244258/

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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11/2/17 1:01 PM as a reply to Ward Law.
emoticon It's already on the list.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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11/15/17 7:43 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
https://youtu.be/UtMADd7ImZ0
Identity and 5 methods for authentic change

This was a Thank You to my 1st 50 subscribers that turned into a longer video about Identity and change. Enjoy!

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
11/27/17 11:12 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Just as promised the last part on the series on Narcissistic Personality Disorder:

Treatment of Narcissistic Personality Disorder - Various Authors (Part 4 of 4)

https://youtu.be/a5rk8PrA1sY

In the beginning we looked at Freud’s contributions from On Narcissism, where we see a self-love aimed at an ego-ideal which makes all important people in the narcissist’s life a means to an end. Achieving the ego ideal. As the child grows up the true self is never developed and a mask used for the public is identified with, which is the False Self. As the False self is challenged in a competitive ruthless environment, the narcissist learns from trial and error how to use politics and leverage to get his or her way. So far we have looked at how inhuman the narcissist is. The robotic quality and lack of empathy, but the narcissist is a person. When someone is far away from the narcissist they can feel sorry for their bad childhood, but when you are a victim it is impossible.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
12/17/17 11:35 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
https://youtu.be/GCxtgwoJmbc
Dependent Co-arising

Hello, Merry Christmas, or Merry Buddha-mas!

Here's my video review of Dependent Co-arising with books authored by Bhkkhu Bodhi, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, Darryl Bailey, and Ajahn Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

This one took a long time, but it helped me to understand Becoming, Birth, and Aging and Death better. Fabrications also makes more sense now. I can understand how people need some basic psychotherapy and practices in manners and improved behaviour, just so they can quiet their mind down enough to have strong concentration.

Enjoy!

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
12/26/17 11:37 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
https://youtu.be/KnsNKpTzaIk
5 tips for Healing Faster from Narcissistic Abuse

I just finished a Narcissist Personality Disorder series, but I felt that there was something missing, which is help for the victim. Once victims have had their sense of self conditioned out of them, they have to rebuild it again in order to recover fully. There are lots of trap doors that slow down the healing process. Here are 5 tips for healing faster from Narcissistic Abuse.

1. Change your environment
2. Deal with Shame
3. Manage your anger
4. See your projections
5. Look at your cultural influences


Right now I'm working on Analayo's books and trying to find a story thread to carry the amount of detail that would make it worth it. At that point I want to continue with Freud, Adler, Jung etc and come back to more Buddhist research on the differences between Theravada and Mahayana.

Have a Happy New Year!

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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1/7/18 3:14 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is my 1st part in a four part series of Freud. It's nice to now leave behind the 1800's and move into the 20th century as the psychological methods become more and more interesting.

https://youtu.be/vATDWOYuyWw
Studies in Hysteria - Freud and Breuer

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
1/7/18 9:51 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Thanks for the video.  I like the production values in it!

I have often thought that what happens in my mind as I sit is freudian free association.  My practice has been to just let the nervous system wind down and it seems to follow along my primitive understanding of both free association and catharthis.  Narratives arise, if I let them they run their course and dissapear and then I get a big release of nervous tension.  As this tension level decreases, happiness is more readily available and I act on emotional triggers less often.  Does that match your own experience/expectations at all?  

I also have the profound experiences of oneness and pleasure that seem to lie beyond the neurotic narrative mind.  Is this the realm of Jung and William James, or did Freud write about it as well? 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
1/7/18 10:29 PM as a reply to seth tapper.
seth tapper:
Thanks for the video.  I like the production values in it!

I have often thought that what happens in my mind as I sit is freudian free association.  My practice has been to just let the nervous system wind down and it seems to follow along my primitive understanding of both free association and catharthis.  Narratives arise, if I let them they run their course and dissapear and then I get a big release of nervous tension.  As this tension level decreases, happiness is more readily available and I act on emotional triggers less often.  Does that match your own experience/expectations at all?  

I also have the profound experiences of oneness and pleasure that seem to lie beyond the neurotic narrative mind.  Is this the realm of Jung and William James, or did Freud write about it as well? 
I'm just learning myself right now. I would say that Freud looks at the ideas popping up as related to survival (the pleasure principle) and aggression that comes up in response to frustrated desires (death instinct). Jung would look at dreams as pushing you towards individuation (my particular path) and that is about developing skills you've neglected thus far. This is of course related to survival. There are so many choices. You can develop concentration so the mind doesn't go all monkey mind on you in the meditative path. You can have the different voices in the dream have their say and see if there's something you can act on to make your life feel more whole. 

For me, it is interesting that our thoughts can make us react emotionally, as much if not more, than real experiences. What you think about affects how you feel and then how you act. Learning to control our consciousness is where our standard of living is, if I'm paraphrasing Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi correctly. 

For me right now it would be Jung's individuation mixed with the self-discipline of Buddhism. You want to achieve goals but you don't want to go after every dream strand in your mind. Certain goals are at the right level for us.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
1/11/18 3:53 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
howdy Richard,
i've been away from the forum for a while but am re-engaging with my developmental intentions and came across your channel.

excellent excellent work, thank you!

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
1/12/18 12:11 AM as a reply to tom moylan.
Thank you. This site and Personality Cafe have been very encouraging. I appreciate it.

I've started a new website and I hope I can start blogging soon. I need to take some Gotham NY writing courses so I can get the lay of the land for the different types of internet non-fiction writing. I know my transitions right now are based on chapter stops. LOL!

https://richard-bukowski.mykajabi.com/

Of course I'll be writing some books. This is an expensive website, so I may have to move it to a cheaper Blogger option at some point. I found a local artist that is interested in doing a cover and just came out with her book:

https://www.daffodilartcollective.com/projects.html
Fable Me

I also clarified my channel's 3 strands and have 3 intros for each video. The Psychology, Contemplative Practice, and Philosophy videos from now on will have separate intros and slightly different aims, but they dovetail on topics like what the self is.

https://youtu.be/EbksQiBTXDo
Psych Reviews - Intros

Hopefully I can get at least a book out in 2018 or lots of videos going further beyond ancient times. At some point I'm going to have to look at my meditation log and see what could be included in a book, if it's interesting enough.

Richard

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
1/20/18 4:19 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Okay I switched to Wordpress. It took some getting used to, but I like the result better with this Kalium template.

I'll be finally getting back to my Freud series.

http://psychreviews.org/

Let me know if there are any technical difficulties.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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2/4/18 10:47 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's a more in depth look at Flow psychology. 

http://psychreviews.org/flow-in-7-steps-mihaly-csikszentmihalyi/

YouTube video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpeIf8Zcriw

Part 2 of Freud is taking some time, but I hope to find a story to thread all these ideas that he puts into his topography of The Mental Apparatus. 

Enjoy!

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
2/10/18 12:13 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I thought it would make sense to describe my initial attitudes towards meditation and how I got into it in the first place. It shows how far I've come and also much further there is to go. There was a time I didn't believe Jhana was a thing at all. Right now going from 4th jhana to 5th is like a big wall, but having those 4 is still a good refuge.

Video:

https://youtu.be/pBAtA2waS0M

Blog:

http://psychreviews.org/jhana/

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
2/15/18 1:30 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's Part 2 of the Freud series.

The Psychical Apparatus

https://youtu.be/B3AwOT9zWgY

Blog:

http://psychreviews.org/the-psychical-apparatus-sigmund-freud/

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
2/23/18 8:59 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's my 1st philosophy section video: Bigotry (Envy Part 1)

Blog:
http://psychreviews.org/bigotry-envy-part-1/

Video:
https://youtu.be/MKYBXQLLmqM

RE: My new YouTube Channel
Answer
3/7/18 1:01 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Hi guys,

This is my review of the Freud classic Totem and Taboo. Despite so much legitimate criticism of Freud there's a lot of good stuff in his books and I can tell that I'll be able to use it as a foundation to understand later clinicians and thinkers.

Totem & Taboo - Sigmund Freud (Envy Part 2)

Psych Reviews blog:

http://psychreviews.org/totem-taboo-sigmund-freud-envy-part-2/

YouTube:

https://youtu.be/aYsiu4v9N6Y

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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3/10/18 5:58 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I just want to thank you guys for the support for my blog and channel. I just touched on the 1st 100 subscribers. This video is just a call out for book recommendations on any of the three strands of Psychology, Contemplative Practice, and Philosophy.


https://youtu.be/zewG5JNkKOA
Your book recommendations

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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3/14/18 4:00 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Do review on The Mind Illuminated.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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3/17/18 6:00 PM as a reply to Mathew Poskus.
Great choice!

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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3/17/18 6:02 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This was a little exhausting but I finished my interviews with both female and male victims of Narcissistic Abuse. Here are the two blog entries:

http://psychreviews.org/male-victims-of-narcissistic-abuse/
Men


http://psychreviews.org/victims-narcissistic-abuse/
Women

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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3/18/18 11:00 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/6/18 11:17 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
If there's one area where I find the difference in older and newer traditions of Buddhism is the emphasis on appropriate effort as a part of the practice. This is emphasized in Analayo's Direct Path book.

https://youtu.be/QSA3LznHNQs
Satipatthana The Direct Path to Realization

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/satipatthana-the-direct-path-to-realization-bhikkhu-analayo/

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/11/18 9:39 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
For those who are interested in Analayo, there is a tentative book date of Oct 2018 for a Satipatthana Practice Guide. They are asking for donations now, but I'm sure they'll find the money:

To sponsor:

https://www.windhorsepublications.com/product/sponsor-apracticeguide/


Preorder:

https://www.amazon.com/Satipatthana-Meditation-Practice-Guide-Analayo/dp/1911407104/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/13/18 1:22 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is the end of a trilogy of interviews on narcissistic abuse.

http://psychreviews.org/lgbtiqa-victims-of-narcissistic-abuse/

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/15/18 2:12 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I just cleaned up my first psychology review of Beverly Engel's - Breaking the cycle of abuse. There's also a good link in the video description and blog that has a chock full of insights on the cycle and how it moves from one generation to another via pathological shame.

Breaking the Cycle of Abuse - Beverly Engel

https://youtu.be/PR21xlDFrGw

Blog:

http://psychreviews.org/breaking-the-cycle-of-abuse-beverly-engel/

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/21/18 10:33 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here is a combination of psychology and meditation insights mixed together. His book alerted me to how unrealistic it would be to do mental work without some strain. Some strain is avoidable with meditation practices, but it is not completely avoidable.

Attention and Effort - Daniel Kahneman

Blog: 

http://psychreviews.org/attention-and-effort-daniel-kahneman/

Video:

https://youtu.be/z_6u4EUyTVM

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/26/18 5:47 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Hi Richard, wouldn't be good and helpful to make a video on Dark Night?

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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4/26/18 1:13 PM as a reply to Mathew Poskus.
Mathew Poskus:
Hi Richard, wouldn't be good and helpful to make a video on Dark Night?

It is definitely a good idea, but I want to study addiction and withdrawal symptoms to make comparisons. In my experience the Dark Night is mental resistance to maintain addictive behaviour. The brain is getting scared as a survival resistance, but there are many explanations. Freud talks about Cathexis, Mourning and Melancholia. It's probably going to be a highly complex topic as per usual. 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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5/17/18 1:37 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Just a heads up! I'm finishing a long video on Spiritual Bypassing. It should be out this Friday. I hope to put a light on meditation and disconnection and how it can be the same disconnection as with any other external numbing with addictions or other activities. 

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5/18/18 2:03 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Spiritual Bypassing and Inner Bonding - Margaret Paul

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/spiritual-bypassing-and-inner-bonding/

Video: https://youtu.be/JVrkwqUdKE8

Have fun Bonding, instead of Bypassing.

What I find interesting, is that meditation can aid connection with the self, by allowing a dialogue with feelings, but also the self can be relaxed in the typical way of meditation. Both options are available. 

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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5/21/18 7:41 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's a guided meditation for good measure on Inner Bonding:


http://psychreviews.org/inner-bonding-guided-meditation/

RE: My YouTube Channel
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5/28/18 1:54 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
June 1st is World Narcissistic Abuse Awareness Day. Despite this being a popular topic, a lot of people still don't believe in this disorder and think these people in their lives are just jerks. Compared to other posts I focused more on childhood influences and some of the popular topics like duping delight and gaslighting.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/world-narcissistic-abuse-awareness-day-june-1st/

Video: https://youtu.be/7_C-P28w058

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5/28/18 3:44 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Hi Richard good videos, good work, good resources and information. keep going with this high quality content in youtube emoticon

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5/28/18 8:14 AM as a reply to Jordi.
Jordi:
Hi Richard good videos, good work, good resources and information. keep going with this high quality content in youtube emoticon

Thanks for the support!

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5/28/18 8:50 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Richard Zen:
Spiritual Bypassing and Inner Bonding - Margaret Paul

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/spiritual-bypassing-and-inner-bonding/

Video: https://youtu.be/JVrkwqUdKE8

Have fun Bonding, instead of Bypassing.

What I find interesting, is that meditation can aid connection with the self, by allowing a dialogue with feelings, but also the self can be relaxed in the typical way of meditation. Both options are available. 


Hey Richard, seconding in appreciation for your videos and blog posts. Found this one particularly interesting, in that I can see in myself how I've at times used meditation to do bypassing. Same for your other posts in another thread I saw here about developing a good relationship with oneself and Rob Burbea's imaginal work.

It inspired me to take out Rob's book Seeing that Frees and look into more of his Dhamma talks on the topic. I'm wondering what your thoughts are on how his approach to Imaginal relates to Jung, do you see it as a similar thing in Dharma framework or a separate developmental process?

RE: My new YouTube Channel
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5/28/18 1:00 PM as a reply to Andrew S.
Andrew S:
Richard Zen:
Spiritual Bypassing and Inner Bonding - Margaret Paul

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/spiritual-bypassing-and-inner-bonding/

Video: https://youtu.be/JVrkwqUdKE8

Have fun Bonding, instead of Bypassing.

What I find interesting, is that meditation can aid connection with the self, by allowing a dialogue with feelings, but also the self can be relaxed in the typical way of meditation. Both options are available. 


Hey Richard, seconding in appreciation for your videos and blog posts. Found this one particularly interesting, in that I can see in myself how I've at times used meditation to do bypassing. Same for your other posts in another thread I saw here about developing a good relationship with oneself and Rob Burbea's imaginal work.

It inspired me to take out Rob's book Seeing that Frees and look into more of his Dhamma talks on the topic. I'm wondering what your thoughts are on how his approach to Imaginal relates to Jung, do you see it as a similar thing in Dharma framework or a separate developmental process?
It looks like he's trying a different process from Theravada Buddhism and Jung. With Jung you are trying to balance yourself with the perspectives of the different archetypes and take action on it. I'm still working on Burbea's earlier imaginal practices because I want to be sure that I'm doing them properly. Otherwise I can't say that I understand his new process. Right now it just looks like allowing the desire to go where it wants (without acting on it) until it finds something satisfying in the imagination. 

These are extremely difficult skills to learn and even Inner Bonding yields lots of insights, despite how simple it is. For example, putting attention on the body and just seeing how satisfied it is and realizing that it is satisfied, and then going back into disembodied thoughts and finding dissatisfaction and addictiveness there. Internal and external motivation is connected with this and I can see how many areas of psychology will overlap here.

I think it's choice and results ultimately. If it works for you and you feel more and more satisfied then you should listen to that.

RE: My YouTube Channel
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6/23/18 4:39 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.

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7/3/18 9:02 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.

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7/14/18 11:47 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.

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7/26/18 12:11 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Thought and Meditation - Rob Burbea

The mindfulness of measuring has been helpful. It cooled my brain just a little bit. Every bit helps.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/thought-and-meditation/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/oRM40U46EXI

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8/12/18 10:59 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's a refurbishment of a prior video on Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams to account for the fact that this series is going to be longer than I thought since Freud ideas developed in a scattered way across many books and papers.  

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/dreams-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: http://youtu.be/dIxp32W5ris

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9/2/18 12:00 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This was a refreshing challenge on the debate between Determinism and Free will. Later developments on the topic in the 20th century would go into areas where determinism creates the free will we have, but in the meantime these types of thoughts feel a lot like a mindfulness meditation.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/the-psychopathology-of-everyday-life-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/oIc_h2tub5M

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9/13/18 11:09 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Freud's theory on Humour and Jokes:

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/humour-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/4vHj7aVUQHU

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9/29/18 6:53 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This was a long review of Freud's sexual theories, and only part 1. A huge part of it was about early theories of sexual orientation. Some of the ideas were funny due to contradictions, but it was only 1905.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/sexuality-aberrations-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/bYI5Fty3Txg

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10/10/18 7:24 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Part two of Freud's basic theories on sexuality: Infantile Sexuality. One gets the sense that a parent's influence can last an entire lifetime.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/sexuality-part-2-infantile-sexuality-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/fo_Qn96acj8

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10/20/18 6:12 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This post took a lot of listening to complete, but it was enjoyable to listen to the hardcore practice of Thanissaro Bhikkhu. He has a sense of humour that's all his own, but it's a humour that reminds us of death.

Emotional Feeding - Thanissaro Bhikkhu

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/emotional-feeding/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/EDgyAPyTM-0

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10/24/18 1:15 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I just listened to & enjoyed this one - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9VjWDy4g6U.  Good audio & slideshow timing/selection.

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10/24/18 12:53 PM as a reply to Noah D.
Thanks!

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10/25/18 7:10 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
The description of stage 10 was funny.  Just the overall "sainthood model" presentation from the book (which I am a fan of) + your calm recitation of it.  I couldn't help but picure the arahant being carried around on a palanquin with an "alzheimer's smile" as I've heard one teacher put it....  

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10/28/18 12:56 AM as a reply to Noah D.
Noah D:
The description of stage 10 was funny.  Just the overall "sainthood model" presentation from the book (which I am a fan of) + your calm recitation of it.  I couldn't help but picure the arahant being carried around on a palanquin with an "alzheimer's smile" as I've heard one teacher put it....  

I would be a little skeptical of these things, partly because these saints live in a protected environment. I don't think it's possible to be like this and live in, let's say New York, as a stock broker and do this lifestyle. Or to do a fast paced job with heavy mental computation pushing you to burnout, and still be an arahant. 

Next...just because someone says they are at a stage isn't the same thing as doing actual scientific trials and tests to prove it to others. We just have to take their word for it. I would just treat it as a goal or target, and we can appreciate the improvements we get from our subjective experience.

A great documentary that came out recently would help support what I'm talking about is Free Solo. It's about Alex Honnold who did a free solo climb up El Capitan. They tested his amygdala and found it very non-reactive, explaining his fearlessness. Yet when he got a girlfriend, and had cameras watching him, his internal motivation turned to external motivation which started to drain him. He convincingly shows the need for preparation on hard goals that are watched by others as the key to success. When something is so over-prepared it becomes easy. Then the external motivation stress reduces. People can do this without meditation, though meditation would help. Overpreparation is more important with difficult goals. We usually don't stress or worry about things we are skilled at (Self-Efficacy).

Most meditators are probably more reactive to fear than he is, so you can count them out as "unsurpassable." It's a nice goal, and being closer to unsurpassable and farther away from suicide, depression, etc. is worth the effort. Stuff like Shinzen talking about being tortured by terrorists and using his meditation to counter that pain is laughable and shows naivete, or hubris.

Reducing, or even curing depression is impressive enough as it is. No need to be a superhero.

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11/4/18 2:17 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is the first installment of Greek Philosophy. Even though Thales is more of a legend, there's a lot that can be learned about rational thinking vs. mythical thinking.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/the-presocratics-thales/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/4HJswRzqM2Y

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11/6/18 10:55 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Cool! Funny thing is that I stumbled on your channel a while back but didn't know it was yours. Good stuff man.

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11/7/18 8:28 PM as a reply to ivory.
ivory:
Cool! Funny thing is that I stumbled on your channel a while back but didn't know it was yours. Good stuff man.


Thanks!

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12/18/18 11:25 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's my first case study, Freud's analysis of "Dora". I put everything but the kitchen sink into this one. It will be nice to take a break!

It includes insights in Transference, Countertransference, Bigotry, Sexism, Projection, Mental Peace, Meaning in life, and probably a lot more. LOL!

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/case-studies-dora-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/vAh-cql2DCQ

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12/29/18 5:55 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Upgrade your New Year's Day resolutions, or Any Day resolutions, with this Guided Meditation. Happy New Year!

YouTube: https://youtu.be/Sdoj1XyB9bI

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/emotional-feeding-guided-meditation/

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12/29/18 10:16 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Oh, that’s you? Cool. I’m already following your channel. :-)

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1/26/19 3:07 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's a review on Freud's Pleasure Principle. It provides a good description of neurosis and how we can turn away from reality.

YouTube: https://youtu.be/0UR4hkbKsJ0


Blog: http://psychreviews.org/the-pleasure-principle-sigmund-freud/

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2/23/19 5:25 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
New video on the internal commentator. It's mostly in the Advaita Vedanta style, but that's a good place to start and end for most people. emoticonHappy insights! 

The Commentator:

Blog:

http://psychreviews.org/the-commentator/


YouTube:

https://youtu.be/auejzRGMa9s



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3/17/19 12:29 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is the next installment of the Presocratics. Anaximander struggles to find a way to move beyond Thales assertion that water is the origin of the world. There's also commentary from Nietzsche and Heidegger, including some Heideggarian meditation methods that should look eeriely familiar. Have a good Sunday!

YouTube: https://youtu.be/QFNze3P_CIU

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/the-presocratics-anaximander/

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5/4/19 9:36 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
World Narcissistic Abuse Awareness Day is upon us soon (June 1st).

Please sign up for your free telesummit: 
https://wnaad.com/

Here's my contribution on the clinging psychology of Stalking, which unfortunately many people have to go through.

This is what people don't tell you about when you want to pursue success.

YouTube: https://youtu.be/IhNDMX0s46w

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/stalking/

Practice well!

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5/4/19 3:38 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Listening to recent vid - This is super interesting , you’re synthesizing a lot of ideas.  Thanks.

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5/4/19 3:46 PM as a reply to Noah D.
It's my INFP brain. It wants to know WHY so I sift through a lot of material. emoticon

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5/11/19 3:50 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's a brief review of Freud's theory of Sublimation. It's a defense mechanism, but it can be more than that with the likes of Leonardo Da Vinci. What I noticed is that much of any pleasure is a relief from pain. Pain is required so that the relief of pleasure can be enjoyed. This is a subtle pain though, not a car accident. This is similar to the Opponent-Process Theory that measures excitement and boredom. It is also like Csikszentmihalyi's Flow. It can also be found in meditative Jhanas, where the progressive Jhanas involve less pain and more refined peace.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/sublimation-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/dcht85_CLGo

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5/15/19 11:17 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is a guided meditation inspired by Thanissaro Bhikkhu's talks on Emotional Feeding. It's also tangentially inspired by the recent Sublimation video. It includes grey noise and text.


Blog: http://psychreviews.org/emotional-feeding-guided-meditation-2/


YouTube: https://youtu.be/w8EqmDPQlPg

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6/24/19 12:09 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
One of the most analyzed psychology cases is that of Daniel Paul Schreber. Included in this analysis are the subjects of Schizophrenia, Paranoia, sexual fluidity, projection, and parenting methods. Of interest to meditators is that concentration in hobbies and interests can quiet the mental voices somewhat, but it's obviously a biological problem that can't be cured as of yet.

Blog: 
http://psychreviews.org/case-studies-daniel-schreber/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/MF_bD7G-lhU



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7/12/19 2:28 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's a video on many ways one can motivate themselves to get started and why they should try. It includes Freud, Play Psychology, Intrinsic Motivation, High Performance research, and a strong attempt at Heideggerian meditations of Gifting, Thanking, and Love. Enjoy!

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/how-to-motivate-yourself/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/TliZGrddzsA

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8/10/19 10:31 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Childhood phobias, triggers, and the danger of brainwashing. 'Little Hans' and Freud. For meditators you can start to see an early map of mental objects of imitated people in our minds, which is a great place to start relaxing those negative faces and personalities that are imitated into the mind.

Blog: 
http://psychreviews.org/case-studies-little-hans-sigmund-freud/


YouTube: https://youtu.be/pD0BdzAduK0

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8/15/19 1:18 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Improving concentration with lots of advice from Gangaji, Pema Chödrön, Leonard Jacobson, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, Amy Aubry, Georgi Y Johnson, Renate McNay, Mariana Caplan and Rob Burbea. It's also a recap of a lot of my recent videos. It's heavy on Mahayana styles for those who care.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/improving-concentration/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/33_b8yKWTFs

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8/18/19 5:20 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Quick tip on Dukkha: https://youtu.be/9kAlGO7Dwls

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9/20/19 3:00 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Here's my response to the allegations against Culadasa from Dharma Treasure regarding sexual misconduct. Though it goes way beyond that! 

YouTube:

https://youtu.be/w9LrDvM2rXQ

Blog:

http://psychreviews.org/scandal-ambivalence-hypocrisy-and-culture/

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9/25/19 2:40 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is a phenomenological study on how Cults work and what to look for when they are influencing you. Like a virus, Cults create fronts to disguise their exploitative agendas. After this video, you'll be able to detect them, even if they are operating in legal operations.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/cult-psychology/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/ywWQLOar5Bo


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10/19/19 12:37 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
This is a review of Freud's 'Ratman,' Ernst Lanzer. It focuses on Transference therapy and the roles of emotional triggers, displacement, projection, and perception in our lives. If you have a meditation practice, try to see if you can catch your emotional triggers, relax the reactions, and accept yourself.

Blog: 
http://psychreviews.org/case-studies-rat-man-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: 
https://youtu.be/GdgOgnUv8LU

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12/23/19 1:41 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.

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12/25/19 1:34 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Finally the trilogy is done with The 'Wolfman' Sergei Pankejeff.

It includes difficult subject matter, including internalized homosexual bigotry, Homosexual OCD, Bisexual erasure, Suicide, Incest and the Cycle of Abuse. For those interested in meditation, you may like Part 2 for Psychoanalytic Mindfulness, and Part 1 for Remembering Repeating and Working-through. The remainder of the topics include the usual Freudian Oedipus Complex and Mimetics. There's a smattering of WWI history and a good description, I think, of how violence escalates into war.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/case-studies-wolf-man-sigmund-freud/

YouTube:

Part 1: https://youtu.be/bMCmhDc9j5U
Part 2: https://youtu.be/7Rw0L6x330A
Part 3: https://youtu.be/ywoB8G3UvO4

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1/1/20 6:48 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
5 reasons why New Year's Resolutions Fail and what to do about it.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/why-new-years-resolutions-often-fa…/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/tysGZbvJlig

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1/18/20 7:12 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Based on Freud’s Love trilogy and René Girard’s meditations, this is an analysis of how relationships, or anything for that matter, can be over or undervalued.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/love-sigmund-freud-and-beyond/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/tVxjMP83ajo

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1/25/20 10:56 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
With different meditation advice on Transference, Communal Happiness, and Wonder, Xenophanes started moving the philosophical conversation to "the good life." His tone is that of someone who likes good behaviour and memorable social exchanges. If I were to get his MBTI type he definitely likes Feeling Extroversion.

Blog: 
http://psychreviews.org/the-presocratics-xenophanes/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/_QvCD-k0FOg



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3/9/20 2:12 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Blog: http://psychreviews.org/the-jhanas/
 
YouTube: https://youtu.be/8HmTQ-IbQnE

A compilation of the 8 Jhanas and insights from the points of view of many masters and commentators: Adyashanti, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, Ajahn Brahm, Leigh Brasington, Rob Burbea, John Butler, Julia Cameron, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Meister Eckhart, Henepola Gunaratana, Martin Heidegger, Daniel Ingram, Ramana Maharshi, Tina Rasmussen, J. Reid Meloy, Rumi, Pak Au Sayadaw, Daniel J. Siegel, Stephen Snyder, Rupert Spira, and Arahant Upatissa.

Stay safe from the stupid virus!

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3/9/20 3:41 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Richard Zen:


Stay safe from the stupid virus!

There is nothing safe within the 31 realms emoticon (jusy kidding)

Will try find time to check that vid, thanks!

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3/23/20 10:41 PM as a reply to Papa Che Dusko.
Papa Che Dusko:
Richard Zen:


Stay safe from the stupid virus!

There is nothing safe within the 31 realms emoticon (jusy kidding)

Will try find time to check that vid, thanks!

I'm more worried about the economy now. So much Samsara!

This video is part of a Freudian exploration of WWI. It will move into Shell Shock/PTSD and then what was learned about the mind after the war.

During WWI, Sigmund Freud was able to stew over his theories, some early criticisms, but he also took stock of the Great War that interrupted everyone's lives. The life that people once new, in what was called the British Peace, the long peace that lasted 100 years, was over. Lives were uprooted, but there was also a lot of optimism on each side. There was a sense of adventure, until one faced reality and saw what adventure really was like.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/war-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/eDgSz9LtjRk

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4/2/20 1:13 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
War Part 2: Freud reviews The Pleasure Principle, The Reality Principle and theorizes a Nirvana Principle.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/war-part-2-beyond-sigmund-freud-and-beyond/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/sU2cZriJZT0

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4/13/20 3:52 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
War Part 3: Group Psychology

Freud's exploration of Prestige and how it influences us.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/war-part-3-group-psychology-freud-and-beyond/

YouTube: 
https://youtu.be/Glw3sOeQEng


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5/2/20 10:24 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Freud theorizes how the conceptual ego is developed.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/the-ego-the-id-and-the-superego-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/Le_jw0YgTwo

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5/15/20 1:06 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
With The Ego and the Id, Freud talked about an expanding Ego-Body-Concept. Now with Otto Fenichel's Narcissistic Supply, what happens when this Ego-concept expands to devour people?

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/narcissistic-supply-freud-beyond/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/P1Mavs4UqYE

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5/19/20 8:50 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
The biggest stumbling block in meditation practice is over-intellectualizing it. A way to get over it is to actively search for a concrete self. Failure is an unexpected pleasure.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/mindfulness/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/zbWbm9DxA68

RE: My YouTube Channel
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5/20/20 8:07 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Now that the sense of self is seen through, there are glimpses of peace. Thanissaro Bhikkhu talks about how to preserve it.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/how-to-meditate-for-longer/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/DgrhPJC9UAk

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5/20/20 2:00 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
In preparation for the impermanence of everything, there is a chance that the mind will breakdown. Shinzen Young describes how impermanence can be fulfilling. Enjoy your practice!

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/mindfulness-gone-anicca/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/jqVkeHw3_3g




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5/25/20 3:59 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
After learning about the Buddhist Three Characteristics, we can now put them all together and enjoy things like Forest Bathing. #AfterCOVID.

YouTube: https://youtu.be/oik1gJuQ-Z0

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/forest-bathing-aftercovid/


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7/3/20 11:40 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Heraclitus was a Oneness type that seems eerily similar to Advaita, but with lots of embracing of duality. 

YouTube: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15JZXiHsD6A

Blog:
http://psychreviews.org/the-presocratics-heraclitus/

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7/3/20 2:05 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Richard Zen:
Thought and Meditation - Rob Burbea

The mindfulness of measuring has been helpful. It cooled my brain just a little bit. Every bit helps.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/thought-and-meditation/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/oRM40U46EXI

I actually discovered this with a google search (was not aware of this thread) and got hooked right away and watched a few more. Great calm voice, very professional production. Super useful!

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7/3/20 5:29 PM as a reply to Sam Gentile.
Sam Gentile:
Richard Zen:
Thought and Meditation - Rob Burbea

The mindfulness of measuring has been helpful. It cooled my brain just a little bit. Every bit helps.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/thought-and-meditation/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/oRM40U46EXI

I actually discovered this with a google search (was not aware of this thread) and got hooked right away and watched a few more. Great calm voice, very professional production. Super useful!

Thanks! 

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7/12/20 1:35 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Sigmund Freud had a lot of trouble with self-defeating patients, especially 'The Wolfman.' He was influenced to study masochism because of recurring beating fantasies indulged by his patients.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/a-child-is-being-beaten-sigmund-freud/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/g_-_9TgTQWg

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7/12/20 2:20 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Nice resourceful channel.. you gain one sub emoticon

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7/12/20 5:40 PM as a reply to Abhishek Sharma.
Have fun!

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7/23/20 11:31 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Sigmund Freud had a lot of trouble with self-defeating patients, especially 'The Wolfman.' He was influenced to study masochism because of recurring beating fantasies indulged by his patients.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/a-child-is-being-beaten-sigmund-freud/

Youtube: https://youtu.be/g_-_9TgTQWg

Sigmund Freud described Masochism as Sadism against one self, but what is Sadism like when it's targeted outside oneself?

Blog: 
http://psychreviews.org/sexuality-pt-5-sadism-freud-and-beyond/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/dupTkCmIzjs







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7/24/20 9:17 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Richard, I found this core idea really significant: "When one has had a frightening, negligent, or abusive background, the need to recreate those circumstances in order to try to master them psychologically can be both visible and tragic." in Part 4

Of course, this plays out quite visible during dark night stages of meditation, but wow, yes it plays out visible and tragically when the dynamic isn't consciously. When meditators really buy into the need to somehow "conquer" the dark night thier is a tendency to keep recreating the triggers they are trying to conquer and for really obstinate people (like myself) it takes hitting bottom before being willing to consider another approach.

I think that a big part of what gets learned through progressive stages of awakening is an alternative approach to this-versus-that style of mastery. There is an appreciation of a sort of "this AND that" approach which doesn't perpetuate the pattern. It's like we learn to extract the lessons we need to learn from both sides of a fightening situation, both the truth of the fear and the truth of the appropriateness of safety...

One related idea from Ken McLeod's writing... https://unfetteredmind.org/the-warriors-solution-passivity-and-freedom-4/

All reactive patterns have two poles which can be called the expressive and the receptive. The example of abuse, physical abuse makes this quite clear. When a parent abuses a child, strikes a child, that experience is usually so strong and so contradictory to what is meant to be happening in the parent-child relationship that the child cannot experience that event in attention. So something freezes. And the child splits into two. And these become the two poles of the pattern.

The one pole, the receptive, is an identity that forms around the experience of being hit and this becomes the victim. And the victim pattern, as it matures through life, is one of passive, of always trying to please, give away, always protective, defensive, hyper-vigilant, etc, etc. Familiar territory, Arlene? Yeah. Anybody who’s worked in psychotherapy knows this very well.

But the other pole also is planted in the child, and that is the expressive, which is the abuser. Because if you have been on the receiving end of abuse there is one thing that you know how to do, you know how to abuse. You know exactly how to do it. And that becomes a sadistic, dominating, belligerent, so forth. And in life a person will typically flip from one to the other. They will form a primary identity about one, but if they encounter circumstances in which that identity can’t function they will just flip to that other pole, because it’s the same pattern.

Student:

Ken: Circumstances. If you think of the bully/coward, if you challenge a bully they flip into a coward. But if you corner a coward they become a bully. And every pattern has those two poles and they flip. This is why we say, “the opposite of a reactive behavior is still the reaction.”

In the opponent’s world with child we meet what we could not face, dissolve that into energy, unite it with the other pole of the pattern, and dissolve that into the energy which it is and in this way come to experience both in attention. In this exercise we meet and experience what we could not face before, and in doing so that dissolves into energy, which is its nature. That energy is united with the other side of the pattern and we meet that and experience it. And that too dissolves into energy. So in this way we experience both sides of the pattern in attention leading to it’s dissolution.

Richard, does any of the ideas that I'm attributing to KMcL sound familiar to you? I think he didn't make it up, but got it from somewhere else. I've been interested in trying to track the source documents/references for this idea of trauma splitting into multiple views/identities/orientations. 


p.s. lots of great links, including songs, in Part 5! emoticon

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7/24/20 10:33 AM as a reply to shargrol.
Yeah, you're post does remind me of Psychoanalysis, in that the brain is constantly going towards complexes and away from them, and of course the meditative way is to let it dissolve, but I would say from what psychoanalysts point to, they want people to go towards the pain to understand it and to learn to take healthy actions that were inhibited by the complexes.

Naturally one could combine these two approaches by learning to tolerate that feeling of danger and then react with healthy assertiveness that isn't too sadistic or masochistic. 

I'm also working on my nihilistic stage, which was working well with Super-ego problems, but now I see that it's just a stage and one has to face complexes to develop further. Upasika Kee Nanayon's Pure and Simple, with pure noticing, without heavy labeling, may be the way forward.

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7/24/20 11:46 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Richard Zen:
Yeah, you're post does remind me of Psychoanalysis, in that the brain is constantly going towards complexes and away from them, and of course the meditative way is to let it dissolve, but I would say from what psychoanalysts point to, they want people to go towards the pain to understand it and to learn to take healthy actions that were inhibited by the complexes.


Actually, I think "going towards pain" is what needs to happen in meditation as well. I don't think the dissolving happens without going towards and inhabiting "pain" consciously. 

Basically, introspection is needed when normal habitual attraction, aversion, and indifference no longer works. The old habits (which may have helped us survive or thrive in the past) just aren't delivering happiness or success anymore. That when we have to stop "taking up" attraction and develop a bit of disenchantment, we have to stop "pushing away" aversion and instead put ourselves in the middle of it, and we have bring awareness to the things we are indifferent to (which often results in a new appreciation of how much "ease" surrounds us, because we're always focused on attraction and aversion and getting pushed and pulled everywhere). When we're able to stay conscious in attention and aversion and indifference without falling into old trances... then the system seems to recalibrate and get the new data it needs for the next challenge or the next stage of life.

The trick really is to go towards pain but not losing "objective awareness" of the pain i.e., without going into the trance again. Then the truth of the complexes are understood, that they are reactive "shortcuts" which sometimes work but mostly just mess up life. And I DEFINITELY agree that the next step definitely has to be healthy actions... otherwise there is understanding without the actual ability to follow through and act. (Lots of people think the insight is enough, but in a certain sense, insight is the halfway point.)

 
I'm also working on my nihilistic stage, which was working well with Super-ego problems, but now I see that it's just a stage and one has to face complexes to develop further. Upasika Kee Nanayon's Pure and Simple, with pure noticing, without heavy labeling, may be the way forward.

Out of curiousity, what flavor of nihilstic patterns? Anger? Aversion? Avoidance? Skepticism? Paralysis? 


Found this text of Pure and Simple, I'm reading it now...
https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/kee/pureandsimple.html

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7/24/20 9:12 PM as a reply to shargrol.
It's more like paralysis and habitual loops. I do get projects completed but I think there's more efficiency that can be developed. Of course being an INFP, part of me is trying to develop the barely conscious ESTJ parts. It's like Jung's understanding on how people can flip personality types at middle age, due to boredom.

For example, going to movies was such a thrill, but I prefer to make videos instead of watch them. When I do watch a movie, I can watch it once or twice and never again. The nihilism can lead to those old loops coming back even when they're dull.

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7/25/20 6:17 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
The paralysis side of things is really interesting... Like how some tasks --- or even how thinking in a particular conceptual domain --- sometimes takes waaay too much activation energy to get started. Even if we ultimately get things done or accomplish the goal, it can feel needlessly exhausting or draining and yet, from the outside looking iin, it would seem to be no big deal to have done it.  And so we kinda know something is going on, but because it isn't wildly painful or wildly fearful, its kinda hard to figure out where the actual psychological resistance is, yet there has to be something going on. It can be fun to just dig and uncover these subtle resistances in meditation. Sometimes there's suprising pay dirt -- a pocket of memories or unconscious "strategies" that are kinda shocking when they are seen in consciousness. 

And it's interesting because at this level of subtilty, there are also other dimensions that come into play. Like I've noticed that all responsible people have to periodically go through adjustments where they realize "I don't have to get all of this done right now". While many people wait until a deadline, effective people often have the opposite problem of sometimes working too fast to check off their responsibilities. A lot of effective workers/professsionals will get odd resistances to working that are actually the body/mind saying "it's okay, you don't have to pursue work so hard" and this can be a good kind of adjustment, but it can feel so wrong. I've notice that most people need a friend or authority figure to say "I  know you always meet the critical deadlines. It's okay to let stuff simmer on the backburner for a while, I know that YOU know when it will be appropriate to do the work and even if you wait until close to the deadline, I know you'll get it done." I had a friend do that for me, and I noticed that there was some aspect of my subconscious that did have a good understanding of when things really needed to be done and indeed I could "slack off" more without being irresponsible. But honestly, it took 5 years of trial and error (but most intensely the first year) before I could trust it.

And then there's the dimension of love, creativity, adventure... sometimes the paralysis is due to the heart yearning for something and all we know is "more getting things done" isn't the answer. This can be an odd kind of paralysis where the super-ego might allow us to slack off, but any attempt to explore new things (or the thing we know we want to do, but can't admit it) will instantly be labelled as frivolous. I've recently had a phase of this myself... and turning 50 years old kinda blew the dust off this dynamic and revealed it more clearly. In other words, the reminder of aging and mortality left me with the counter-thought: when on earth do you think you will have time to try these new things out? It's not like you have endless time left.  emoticon  I've made a pact with myself that I'll use the expression "sure, I'll try it!" more this year...

I kinda think that this dynamic ---- the paralysis-adventure spectrum ---- is one of nearly endless refinement. The body/mind needs to conserve energy to better survive, yet life is unfullfilling if we stay in our ruts, and yet nothing masterful is accomplished without putting ourself in a self-selected rut, yet nothing adds creativity than getting out of out of ruts, etc. It's not about choosing only one option, but kind of an artful dance we have to figure out.

(Well, that was a diatribe  emoticon  Anyway, thanks for evoking all these thoughts!) 

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7/25/20 8:54 AM as a reply to shargrol.
Yes, the PANG of mortality is a big motivator! emoticon

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8/14/20 1:44 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Well, it's been 3 years, and it's time to say goodbye to Sigmund Freud, though I expect he'll be back since so many other psychologists talk about him.

In this last episode, Freud faces religion, wishful thinking, and the problem of maintaining individual happiness in a world of envy and aggression. Included also are the emotional precursors of Nazism and Communism. He also tackles the age-old question, "What does a woman want?"

YouTube: https://youtu.be/6UhoAdsWkGQ

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/psychoanalysis-sigmund-freud/

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8/15/20 9:47 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Interesting -- I never quite put together how obsessional = superego, but that makes a lot of sense. Obsession has a high degree of pseudo-awareness but is strangely unobservant; having perceptions filtered through the superego helps explain the all-or-nothing lack of nuance and "obligation" feeling of obsession. 

p.s. this is a very content rich summary -- thank you! --  i can already tell i'll want to read it a few times to reaaly get freud's thinking/model. 

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8/15/20 10:17 AM as a reply to shargrol.
shargrol:
Interesting -- I never quite put together how obsessional = superego, but that makes a lot of sense. Obsession has a high degree of pseudo-awareness but is strangely unobservant; having perceptions filtered through the superego helps explain the all-or-nothing lack of nuance and "obligation" feeling of obsession. 

p.s. this is a very content rich summary -- thank you! --  i can already tell i'll want to read it a few times to reaaly get freud's thinking/model. 

It's an early personality typology, but Obsessional involves that feeling when we imagine Objects/Entities in our mind and we get the feeling of Others and being watched. He connects this with religious attitudes of feeling an entity is watching you and judging you. Then he connects superstitious rituals with the placating of the internal object to avoid punishment. It's a way to control people without being there. We also can then do weird rituals and connect coincidences to them which reinforce the magical belief. In the modern day would be cults, tarot cards, and the such, where we project that they work and tend to focus on when it seems like they are working and ignore when it doesn't work. The feeling of helplessness keeps people wanting to believe. Heidegger also talks about this in a different way. We avoid being authentic because we have to face our past and our future death when we take responsibility. A lot of diversions, distractions and addictions are there to numb the effect, but if you're meditative enough you can detect that pang of morality before watching crappy TV, playing a video game or just coasting on the internet. It's very powerful and quite unconscious! emoticon

I would add some caveats. Freud squishes psychopaths and narcissists together in the narcissistic self-preservation side, but it's possible to follow an abuser in the mind and think you are doing the right thing. A perfect example is Moral disengagement where the Super-ego excuses let you do bad things with justification and condoning. Watch An Act of Killing and you'll see one gangster dry-heaving while talking about his executions of Chinese communists, while the other guy can talk about it without any bother. Empathy can be involved in the Erotic-Obsessional side, but if the excuses are motivating enough, one can do evil things with empathy.

Carl Jung of course aimed to find a lot more in that Super-ego than Freud did.

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8/15/20 5:24 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
It's really interesting to see all of this in western psychology. I'm seeing links between superego and aversion, id with greed, and ego with fantasy/ignorance --- but don't quote me yet, I'm still thinking this through...  and I want to also think about the three wounding types (shame, betrayal, and abandonment) and see if there is any alignment in these models that use "3" -- maybe not, which would be just as interesting.

How would you say freud squishes them together?  I though there was some separation in the sense of fantasy vs hysteria vs neurotism... but I haven't fully grasped this model yet.

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8/15/20 10:04 PM as a reply to shargrol.
shargrol:
It's really interesting to see all of this in western psychology. I'm seeing links between superego and aversion, id with greed, and ego with fantasy/ignorance --- but don't quote me yet, I'm still thinking this through...  and I want to also think about the three wounding types (shame, betrayal, and abandonment) and see if there is any alignment in these models that use "3" -- maybe not, which would be just as interesting.

How would you say freud squishes them together?  I though there was some separation in the sense of fantasy vs hysteria vs neurotism... but I haven't fully grasped this model yet.

Narcissists can have a dark Super-ego that they identify with, whereas a Psychopath, including the way Freud describes it, is Ego with an absent Super-ego. They don't have scruples. They're not worried about shame. There's also some later descriptions of Psychopaths from J. Reid Meloy that I still need to understand where the projection is so strong that the Psychopath can attack people while somehow thinking that they are defending themselves.

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8/16/20 6:35 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Is it possible that I'm not understanding because you are using narcissist in the modern sense and not the freudian sense?

This is somewhat hard for me to truly "get" because I've lived so much of my life as someone with a turbo-charged superego emoticon... actually, I'd say I was somewhere in the erotic-obssessional if I had to pick my patholgy.... and so it's hard for me to understand at a visceral level, but intellectually I can see that freudian narcissists really don't have much superego nor a need for being loved and that's the key diagnostic quality. It seems like the freudian narcissist has an overdeveloped ego that is largely uninfluenced by the "superior other" superego and "need to belong and be loved" of the id. As a result, very cold and singular. 

It seems like a modern sense of narcisist is closes to Freud's Erotic-Narcissist. They are still defining themeselves in a kind of pseudo-relationship. Because they idendify so strongly with something as transient as a sense of self, which we know from meditation is created by conditions rather than being an inherently solid thing,so their sense of egoic self needs constant activity otherwise it goes away --- in the same way that air is there, but we don't feel it without motion --- and so there is a constant using of others to create a sense of self.

I think pure freudian narcissism is the same as psychopathy. A user and lacking any sense of mutuality of the erotic or inferiority of the superego.... rather the erotic aspect becomes the ongoing activity of pleasure-pain manipulation and obsessional/hierarchical aspect becomes ongoing activity of estabishing dominance.

It seems like schizophrenia is more on the narssistic-obsessional side, or perhaps a case of fairly pure obsessional. It seems like in this model that obsessional types are prone to psychosis.

Does that make sense? --- again, I'm still learning Freud's model, so I'm probably missing a lot. 


"
narcissistic type, is mainly to be described in negative terms. There is no tension between ego and super-ego (indeed, on the strength of this type one would scarcely have arrived at the hypothesis of a super-ego), and there is no preponderance of erotic needs. The subject’s main interest is directed to self-preservation; he is independent and not open to intimidation. His ego has a large amount of aggressiveness at its disposal, which also manifests itself in readiness for activity. In his erotic life loving is preferred above being loved. People belonging to this type impress others as being ‘personalities’; they are especially suited to act as a support for others, to take on the role of leaders and to give a fresh stimulus to cultural development or to damage the established state of affairs.”

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8/16/20 7:56 AM as a reply to shargrol.
shargrol:
Is it possible that I'm not understanding because you are using narcissist in the modern sense and not the freudian sense?

This is somewhat hard for me to truly "get" because I've lived so much of my life as someone with a turbo-charged superego emoticon... actually, I'd say I was somewhere in the erotic-obssessional if I had to pick my patholgy.... and so it's hard for me to understand at a visceral level, but intellectually I can see that freudian narcissists really don't have much superego nor a need for being loved and that's the key diagnostic quality. It seems like the freudian narcissist has an overdeveloped ego that is largely uninfluenced by the "superior other" superego and "need to belong and be loved" of the id. As a result, very cold and singular. 

It seems like a modern sense of narcisist is closes to Freud's Erotic-Narcissist. They are still defining themeselves in a kind of pseudo-relationship. Because they idendify so strongly with something as transient as a sense of self, which we know from meditation is created by conditions rather than being an inherently solid thing,so their sense of egoic self needs constant activity otherwise it goes away --- in the same way that air is there, but we don't feel it without motion --- and so there is a constant using of others to create a sense of self.

I think pure freudian narcissism is the same as psychopathy. A user and lacking any sense of mutuality of the erotic or inferiority of the superego.... rather the erotic aspect becomes the ongoing activity of pleasure-pain manipulation and obsessional/hierarchical aspect becomes ongoing activity of estabishing dominance.

It seems like schizophrenia is more on the narssistic-obsessional side, or perhaps a case of fairly pure obsessional. It seems like in this model that obsessional types are prone to psychosis.

Does that make sense? --- again, I'm still learning Freud's model, so I'm probably missing a lot. 


"
narcissistic type, is mainly to be described in negative terms. There is no tension between ego and super-ego (indeed, on the strength of this type one would scarcely have arrived at the hypothesis of a super-ego), and there is no preponderance of erotic needs. The subject’s main interest is directed to self-preservation; he is independent and not open to intimidation. His ego has a large amount of aggressiveness at its disposal, which also manifests itself in readiness for activity. In his erotic life loving is preferred above being loved. People belonging to this type impress others as being ‘personalities’; they are especially suited to act as a support for others, to take on the role of leaders and to give a fresh stimulus to cultural development or to damage the established state of affairs.”

Of course we are all missing a lot (DSM has more than what Freud would have had experience with). It's a good starting point, but there are degrees of pathology. Schizophrenia is definitely on his obsessional side, but also when he talks about narcissistic-psychoneuroses. There are differences of degrees. A modern day narcissist is often described as someone with a preferred reality that steam-rolls over reality, and people, to find only the parts of reality that confirm the fantasy (Narcissist-Obsessional?). Anything that doesn't is attacked, by the Ego?, or ignored. Narcissists are still in a grip of reality much more so than someone with schizophrenia. Then you probably would have to add paranoia somewhere, probably Super-ego, and all the modern day personality disorder details have to be added. 

Freud also compares the healthy behaviours vs. unhealthy ones (Life Drive vs. Death Drive). Outwardly destructive, and self-destructive behaviours have a dark pleasure to them and would have to be added to all the different types. Drives are another controversial subject, but the dark-side keeps coming back because it doesn't fit well with modern Positive Psychology notions. There are people who love self-development and all the steps on the way, but many people find it daunting, exhausting, neurotic, and want to lash out against it because they are looking for control. emoticon

The brain is the most complex thing we know of so it's only going to get more complicated as I move along. emoticon

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8/16/20 10:05 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Death drives fascinate me. At the heart of it, I'm somewhat darwinian in the sense that all drives seem like life drives to me, but there are times when the wrong drive is relied upon and becomes counterproductive, like sawing off a branch that you are sitting on. Someone acting out a death drive will feel convinced that their actions are supporting a thriving life... but a person outside their frame of reference can see the reality of it. 

This comes up a lot in buddhist psychology, with the idea of 6 realms. Each one of the realms has it's own internal logic, but has a blindness that maintain suffering. Hell realm being lash out against each other, recreating the harm that they are trying to prevent. Hungry ghosts consume so quickly and mindlessly that they never feel satisfaction. Animals double down on what has worked in the past, and repeat all their past mistakes. Humans invest in their desires, but never question why most desires don't satisfy except temporarily. Titans use their strength and power, but always go beyond their abilities and fail. Gods are so busy maintaining what they have, that they lose track of reality and get blindsided by small, incremental things that are not worthy of their attention.

All of the things that reinforce suffering are perfectly appropriate in other contexts. Protecting from harm, satisfying needs, rewarding routines, creativity, ambition, and appreciation... but in the 6 realms they are focused on a very limited sense of self and there is no sense of interdependence or nuance. So maybe death drives are life drives but ignorantly applied?

People have a hard time seeing/admitting to ignorance. Again, I have a bit of a darwinian view of this. It is energetically costly to update a worldview, so out of efficiency the mind will tend to ignore stimuli that doesn't reconfirm the worldview. This makes good energetic sense. Then there also is a "suffering threshold" which says "reality is differing significantly enough from your worldview, so you need to pay attention, collect new data, develop new models". 

In a way, buddhist meditation is a hack: by focusing on the suffering tone, adult development is spurred onward. It can be quite interesting to see how much development occurs in a decade among meditators versus others in their age group --- it really is night and day. Basically, by intentionally looking for discomfort or ill will within lived experience, the mind has motivation to develop a more real worldview that both sees and includes all of these subtle sufferings that are normally glossed over and ignored by most people. At the heart of it is the nature of creating a self, the defense mechanisms involved, and the limitations created by worldviews themselves --- the very meta worldview of someone who has, so to speak, awakened to these things. 


Heh, to skipping ahead to the chase scene.... Any model of psychology you particularly like? Any reading recommendations for me?

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8/16/20 10:25 AM as a reply to shargrol.
Definitely Buddhism has helped alot with understanding Freud. Libido sounds like jargon to most people but I translate it as craving, though would modify it more like Electricity-Craving. Why Freud is misunderstood is precisely because he's trying to analyze different cravings and how they can be released. People poo-poo him when they make comparisons with Psychiatry, Brain Surgery, and Clinical Psychology. These all have their contributions, but many people just want to understand their cravings, and also those other modalities can have failures and they end up dumping people into taking therapy because there's nothing else they can do.

In regards to Buddhism and modern society, to me the Buddhist understanding is competing with the Self understanding, and it's a difficult conundrum. A lot of the science and technology we enjoy came from the Self side of things and to bridge emptiness with one satisfaction after another is what most of the population will understand and support. Emptiness-Form/Form-Emptiness is a helpful way to avoid false dichotomies. As I expect when I read Jung, I'm going to see that we need appropriate responses to wildly different phenomena and using a "hammer and treating everything as a nail" will have to be abandoned. A lot of good leadership books show how flexible people have to be in business to stay afloat. Personally I like eclecticism and learning from a wide range of areas because of how Darwinian the world is and the need for flexibility and for skills to merge different modalities.

I don't have any specific recommendations, but I'm studying the Opponent process theory, (though this will be awhile before it finds its way anywhere - probably in a video on addictions), which is partially predictive of addictive behaviours. Craving has tolerance, but there's also pleasure in work and the relief when work is satisfactorily complete. It also partially describes how pain/work can lead to the body to do the opposite to heal itself to homeostasis. It focuses more on the pleasure of creativity over pure consumption because the brain provides a downer to bring the high back to homeostasis. It also connects well with Csikszentmihalyi's Flow system, as so many modalities do. But of course it's not perfect and isn't predictive of all things. They did some studies on fitness, but that's a difficult area because people can injure themselves. Finding that healthy sweet spot is going to be individual depending on the people in the study.

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8/16/20 10:46 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Interesting!

I think the challenge most people have with Jung is they want to create intrinsically real "thing" out of what get's encountered as these raw forces like superego and id become deconstructed into something much more creative, primal, and liminal. All the semi-lucid urges and semi-fantastic images have to be honored as just that, rather than trying to make experience into some pantheon of independent entities.

This can also happen with the woowoo stuff that seems inevitable in medtation, the periods of almost channeled inteligence, encountering other beings within our mind, strange psychic intuitions, and magical synchonicities. These are easy to deal with if they are seen as momentary events consistent with those lables, which have already come and gone so no big deal. But human nature is to cling and reify and so people will always make more of a big deal than is appropriate and will always try to control/own/command these strange "powers". It's a fool's errand but we all need to take the fool's journey. 

Jung's stuff has the potention to break worldviews out of their materialistic/elemental simplicity into something much more organic and creative... or people can freak out when they realize there is no controlling creativity and no guarantees and then they'll come up with a new system that basically shoves all the creativity back into box. emoticon


Cool, I think I'll check out Opponent process theory in the near future! Thanks again for this chat!

RE: My YouTube Channel
Answer
9/11/20 11:21 AM as a reply to Richard Zen.
After eroding a pathological Super-ego with mindfulness and concentration one can take advantage of the pleasures of Positive Psychology. For many, this is their stopping point, but for others, there is even more to meditation. Commentary and suggestions from Positive psychology, Upasika Kee Nanayon, Rob Burbea, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, and Adyashanti.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/mindfulness-letting-go/

YouTube: https://youtu.be/iekCpuNqmek

RE: My YouTube Channel
Answer
9/11/20 2:19 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
I've already listened to this one and I think it's great. I think people will be interested in how a lot of meditation is explained/understood and fine-tuned through various psychological principles/approaches.

And I loved the framing device of comparing good/bad vacations with the same habits that create good/bad meditations!

RE: My YouTube Channel
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9/11/20 2:23 PM as a reply to shargrol.
shargrol:
I've already listened to this one and I think it's great. I think people will be interested in how a lot of meditation is explained/understood and fine-tuned through various psychological principles/approaches.

And I loved the framing device of comparing good/bad vacations with the same habits that create good/bad meditations!
It certainly helped me a lot. The visualizing downsides is one of those groundbreaking insights that makes a sudden difference, but I know that everyone's different and react to different details. It depends on what they need.

RE: My YouTube Channel
Answer
10/19/20 8:03 PM as a reply to Richard Zen.
Description of a gradual development towards Nirvana. Authors include Thanissaro Bhikkhu, Rob Burbea, Bhikkhu Analayo, Christopher Titmuss, Guang Po, Jeffrey Hopkins, Daniel Ingram, Rupert Spira, Daniel J. Siegel, B.F. Skinner, and Adyashanti.

I took the prior Mahasi noting video and Rob's Seeing that Frees video and added it to this one so that everything is included in one place. I'll probably return back to Buddhist videos, but for now, I'm going to explore some Western religions and see what meditations they have.

Blog: http://psychreviews.org/mindfulness-nirvana/
 
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDWIoYQunvQ