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Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive

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I don't really love animals, and never really liked the mushroom culture type vibes from vegan people.

But I have been doing a 30 day vegan challenge for charity, and its really changing my mind on eating a much more plant based diet. It is a lot easier, and more beneficial than I thought. 

I am also very into fitness recently and eat like 0.8-1g of protein per lb of bodyweight (pretty easy esp. with vegan protein supplement), and have been cutting, havent really noticed any changes in performance at the gym.

Seems likes its a pretty simple change that results in reduction in suffering for many sentient beings, and also reduces green house gas emissions. And reduces risk for heart disease and cancer.

So the challenge open to all meat eating DhO posters is this:
1) Give up consuming animal products for 30 days.
2) Document your progress on some form of social media (facebook, instagram etc).
3) Upon completion I will personally send you $100, via paypal or bitcoin as incentive for completing the challenge.

After 30 days you can do whatever you want, eat whatever you want. etc.

Really hoping someone takes me up on the offer.

RE: Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive
Answer
11/15/18 5:55 AM as a reply to (D Z) Dhru Val.
plant base = high carb and high omega 6

no thanks Jeff.

RE: Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive
Answer
11/15/18 8:00 AM as a reply to alguidar.
Plant based as in a bowl of marinated assorted beans in olive oil and herbal seasoning, fried tofu with chili-tahini sauce, fried carrot and baby spinach and a handful of seasoned quinoa with roasted seeds. There's more protein and fat in there than in a regular steak!

RE: Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive
Answer
11/15/18 9:18 AM as a reply to (D Z) Dhru Val.
Well, I've been eating that way for more than 4 years now.

The idea is not only plant-based, but whole foods (WF-Pemoticon. For example, flour is plant based, but not whole food.
When I started, it was a challenge (I was nearly 6 months strict zero animal foods).

Nowadays, I'm a little more flexible (but really still pretty strict). I usually go 2 or 3 weeks without animal foods. And when I do eat, I eat very little, maybe a portion of pizza.

I really don't miss any animal food except cheese.
I do take a B12 supplement.

Also eating well means cutting down on sugar and salt.

It is really hard when you start, but eventually your friends and family get used to it.

Feeling really well can be a course.
No matter if the source of feeling well is meditation, food, money, etc.
It can't be shared or described with accuracy, and there's a limit to what you can do to encourage other to take actions to get it.

Changing my diet is the second best thing I've done in my life (the first is meditation emoticon).

It woud be really easy for me to accept the challenge, but, as I'm already been eating this way for so long it would be cheating emoticon.

About strength, I'm really a lot stronger than before (and I'm a lot leaner). The most noticeable was the grip in my hand (night and day) and my ability to sustain postures or lift things for long periods of time.

I guess strength it's not so much about mucle size but blood flow to muscles.
Blood flow is really underestimated.
What good is anything you eat (protein, fat, carbs, vitamins, minerals, you name it) if it can't get the cells in your body?.

RE: Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive
Answer
11/15/18 4:26 PM as a reply to (D Z) Dhru Val.
Low-carb is the modern way to health:

“Effects of a low carbohydrate diet on energy expenditure during weight loss maintenance: randomized trial”

BMJ 2018; 363

https://www.bmj.com/content/363/bmj.k4583

RE: Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive
Answer
11/15/18 9:58 PM as a reply to Billy.
Billy:
Low-carb is the modern way to health:

“Effects of a low carbohydrate diet on energy expenditure during weight loss maintenance: randomized trial”

BMJ 2018; 363

https://www.bmj.com/content/363/bmj.k4583

Actually a pretty cool study that I hadn't seen before, I like that they controlled for protein intake (at 20%) as well as calories, however demonstrating a statistically significt level of insulin impact doesn't really follow that "low-carb is the path to health".

I like to take a nutrient centric view, rather than a source centric view of nutirtion.

1)
I am not really convinced about insulin impact theory for weightloss (I think its net caloric surplus or deficit is way more important)

But for insulin impact intermittent fasting is superior to eathing a 0 carb diet, here is an article from an insulin impact theory advocate, comparing low carb with intermittent fasting.
https://idmprogram.com/power-comparison-fasting-vs-low-carb-fasting-26/

2)
I think there are other benefits to a plant based diet (lower cancer rates, lower artheosclerosis) that result in increased lifespan. The longest lived communities in america (veg 7th day adventists), and globally are all primarily plant based, with limited animal product consumption.

So if you are concered about optimal health, eating primarily plant based and intermittent fasting for weight loss is probably ideal.

3)
I think decreasing meat consumption, particularly processed meats is probably a good idea for most people. I used to eat half a chicken, a couple of eggs, and a beef based shepherd's pie every day. I think cutting it down to some fish once a week, and maybe some yoghurt every now and then might be ideal.

RE: Would you try a plant based diet for 30 days - $100 incentive
Answer
11/16/18 7:51 AM as a reply to (D Z) Dhru Val.
(D Z) Dhru Val:

The longest lived communities in america (veg 7th day adventists), and globally are all primarily plant based, with limited animal product consumption.


That may be true, but it highlights a major flaw in nutritional epidemiology, namely, the unwarranted leap from correlation to causation. There are no controls, and there are precious few interventional studies. An article published the other day pointed out that even the base data are often flawed:

"The Failure to Measure Dietary Intake Engendered a Fictional Discourse on Diet-Disease Relations", Front. Nutr., 13 November 2018

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2018.00105/full

BTW the SDA are the people who got everyone thinking that a healthy breakfast consists of sugary carbohydrates, sugary juice, and sugary coffee. Thanks, but no thanks.