From many to (n)one: Meditation and the plasticity of the predictive mind

Eudoxos ., modified 1 Month ago.

From many to (n)one: Meditation and the plasticity of the predictive mind

Posts: 57 Join Date: 4/6/14 Recent Posts
I found this fresh open-access article worth reading: it uses the predictive brain model to look at 3 types of Buddhist deconstructive meditation (focused attention, open awareness, non-dual meditation) and explains their functioning in terms of this model, interprets insights as consolidation of internal representation, discusses different levels of self-representation and their pruning during the contemplative process. They also explain some Buddhist concepts using the framework (such as 3 characteristics), so don't stay just in the dry neuro field. Definitely a good read for Thomas Metzinger's fans out here emoticon He's not one of the authors, but is mentioned in acknowledgements as someone the authors discussed with. Abstract follows. Enjoy!

How profoundly can humans change their own minds? In this paper we offer a unifying account of deconstructive meditation under the predictive processing view. We start from simple axioms. First, the brain makes predictions based on past experience, both phylogenetic and ontogenetic. Second, deconstructive meditation brings one closer to the here and now by disengaging anticipatory processes. We propose that practicing meditation therefore gradually reduces counterfactual temporally deep cognition, until all conceptual processing falls away, unveiling a state of pure awareness. Our account also places three main styles of meditation (focused attention, open monitoring, and non-dual) on a single continuum, where each technique relinquishes increasingly engrained habits of prediction, including the predicted self. This deconstruction can also permit certain insights by making the above processes available to introspection. Our framework is consistent with the state of empirical and (neuro)phenomenological evidence and illuminates the top-down plasticity of the predictive mind. Experimental rigor, neurophenomenology, and no-report paradigms are needed to further understanding of how meditation affects predictive processing and the self.

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Stefan R, modified 1 Month ago.

RE: From many to (n)one: Meditation and the plasticity of the predictive mi

Posts: 109 Join Date: 3/28/21 Recent Posts
Link to the article is missing, I'd like to read the full article please! emoticon
Sorry! I fixed the link in the original post, here again: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014976342100261X
A. Dietrich Ringle, modified 1 Month ago.

RE: From many to (n)one: Meditation and the plasticity of the predictive mi

Posts: 780 Join Date: 12/4/11 Recent Posts
Loosening the metaphorical noose of predictive thinking is one way to enter jhana. From the top down.

​​​​​​​Such an approach is novel to me, and jhana can be its own type of noose. This is not mentioned that frequently in Daniel Ingram's thinking (not to say his isn't a complete teaching.)

"Experimental rigor, neurophenomenology, and no-report paradigms are needed to further understanding of how meditation affects predictive processing and the self."

​​​​​​​This baffals me
A. Dietrich Ringle, modified 1 Month ago.

RE: From many to (n)one: Meditation and the plasticity of the predictive mi

Posts: 780 Join Date: 12/4/11 Recent Posts
What I said about being baffled is reminds me of the heart sutra. Which sense door are you in investigating

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