The Path: what comes?

behhbhamwzdbttcc behhbhamwzdbttcc, modified 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 1:30 AM
Created 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 1:30 AM

The Path: what comes?

Posts: 2 Join Date: 1/9/24 Recent Posts
Let me start by telling you that I am not that far: I have only observed a bit of how the mind works: there are processes fighting for the attention field. Thoughts (sensations or more abstarct) happen in these processes. They have a limited duration and and while they fade, there might be something between them which I can't observe yet.

What I fail to understand is what happens after one sees it all. I am not sure if "seeing it all" leads or not to an awakening event; and it does not matter much in this disucussion. Once you know what is there, it is very easy to go back and look again, even without formal meditation practice. What are actually people who got there still doing on the zafu and why? And did Buddha meditate for himself (and not as a form of teaching) in a structured manner after his event under the Bodhi tree?
thumbnail
Sha-Man! Geoffrey, modified 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 8:06 AM
Created 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 8:06 AM

RE: The Path: what comes?

Posts: 351 Join Date: 10/30/23 Recent Posts
Well, when you go back time and time again and you "see it all" you realize "it all" might be drastically different! In the beginning it's very useful to have times of dedicated practice that are explicitly meditation/technique focused because doing this let's you cut through a lot of the chatter that is so prevalent that most of the time we don't even notice when it's there. As you progress, you start to bring this noticing to more things, like walking, eating, being around others. Then as get advanced more and more the lines between "formal meditation" and regular life seem to blur more and more, but it's still helpful to have dedicated practice to help notice the subtle things that usually get missing when something more exciting is going on.

I would say, keep trying to go deeper to see how the mind works, it goes well beyond thoughts. After all, if you take the scientific approach what's going on is sensory data comes into our brain, and our brain constructs everything from that, so in that sense "it is all mind".

To help yourself on the understanding mind part, maybe try to probe some of these questions. How do thoughts feed into emotions and vice versa? Who are you (are you this body, these thoughts, these emotions? Who's controlling this thing? Who is seeing? What is knowing?). What is it like when you focus on something soothing and the mind calms down? What kinds of things take you out of that calm? 
thumbnail
Chris M, modified 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 8:15 AM
Created 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 8:15 AM

RE: The Path: what comes?

Posts: 5141 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
What I fail to understand is what happens after one sees it all. I am not sure if "seeing it all" leads or not to an awakening event; and it does not matter much in this disucussion. Once you know what is there, it is very easy to go back and look again, even without formal meditation practice. What are actually people who got there still doing on the zafu and why? And did Buddha meditate for himself (and not as a form of teaching) in a structured manner after his event under the Bodhi tree?


It's not that meditation stops after things are seen. It's that mediation becomes how one experiences the world.
Martin, modified 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 10:53 AM
Created 2 Months ago at 1/16/24 10:53 AM

RE: The Path: what comes?

Posts: 775 Join Date: 4/25/20 Recent Posts
I heard someone say that meditation is like practicing an instrument (playing scales and riffs, trying out new things, getting things down) and life is like jamming.

Also, yes, the Buddha continued to practice formal meditation regularly and frequently went off by himself for days to meditate. According to the sutta record, as he lay dying, he practiced jhana meditation.