The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Carole Royanne Lindberg, modified 7 Years ago.

The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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I am a lucid dreamer from some years back and started practicing shamatha some months ago after I luckily came upon this book that explained the stages of development and the importance of practicing shamatha meditation. The book elaborates upon the system of Kamalshila, an eight century Indian contemplative who wrote "Stages of Meditation". Before I found this book, - and this site,- I had begun and given up on meditation many times, being always lost in the effort of stilling and returning from my ever wandering thoughts. Finally I am moving out of this stage, because of this book, and the great online sangha of DhO.
Mario Nistri, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Hi, welcome here!

There has been an extensive discussion on it, tought you might be interested...

Bye!
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Carole Royanne Lindberg, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Thanks, I was looking around in Discussion and wondering why I hadn't found anything about it. I'll look further!
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Hi there, here is some stuff on the relationship between concentration and pure insight practice. Access Concentration, Jhana, High Equanimity & Vipassana Jhana. This essay is really written for those versed in the topic of debate, around Vipassana Yanika's and Samatha Yanika's Traditions. A distinction is made between momentary concentration & fixed concentration in these two traditions. In the insight tradition ising momentary concentration the practitioner needs to get to the lvl of neighbourhood concentration/ access concentration. There are different definitions of access concentration. But both traditions agree that access concentration is required.

Check this out by Bikkhu Bodhi, The Jhanas & the Lay Disciple: According to the Pali SuttasThe Jhanas and the Lay Disciples it covers the debate around the suttas about when and how much concentration is needed to first attain path and beyond.

I would suggest that in the beginning stages of practice, in either insight or concentration styled practices, there is not always as distinction between investigation and concentration. Both of these are require a portion of the other in the development of both practices. As one gets better at staying calm, it becomes easier to do without the investigation that is required to relax and also balance laxity & excitation. Or from an insight perspective, as you learn to stay present in the moment with bodily sensation/bare sensations, the mind become present with the flow of these different sensations. Also in some ways you could say this is a bit like fixation without an object. Which is a dzogchen style of shamata, the development of which is mentioned in the attention revolution and in a book called 'contemplating reality' by namkhai norbu.

In conclusion, working with both practices 'can' be beneficial, and they both have different difficulties, which become present as one advances in ones practice. In the early stages of shamata is can be hard to really get anywhere, in the middle stages of practice, deep shit from your unconscious can arise and in the later stages conceit and blissful complacency are a real problem. With pure insight there are two cycles the second is longer and harder, like a spiral coiling around. One starts with of becoming present, then aware with a kind of intensity that is observant of stuff like suffering, and which breaking through to bliss. This is then sort of repeat again, but calm/equanimity is the end result in the second longer more difficult spiral. But to use a three stage model for insight you might say that its 1) hard then 2) easy (that is because the A&P/ the arising and passing away, is the most pleasurable and fun stage, which may be comparative to a kundalini awakening) then 3) really hard (because equanimity is difficult to maintain, and as you deepen into it you become more sensitive to dukha, require a high level of equanimity and concentration for it to be pleasant, which unfortunately isn't the point, but rather the development of tolerance and acceptance. also on top of that you often fall back in the dark night). That is because Equanimity is very hard to maintain and one falls back into the dark night repeatedly while attempting to attain it and past through it to attainment. But if you can face this and keep it up that is the only significant difficulty. I still haven't attained path my self and have been stuck in high mastery as my peak of practice. And I'm sort of scared to practice because the level of tolerance required must be very consistent.

Good Luck, I hope my advice isn't confusing. As it doesn't conform to the dominant view on this site nor does it conform to Wallaces view. Both of which I have a high lvl of respect for! Sincerely Neem
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Carole Lindberg, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Hi Neem,

Wow, there is a lot of great material here to read that you are sending on. Thanks a lot, and I will get back to you on some of the points when I go through it more carefully.

In the meantime, and as talked about in the "extensive discussion" sent on by Mario, I have an inquiry about the time put against practice. As Mr. Wallace says, for us to get into a deep level of samatha practice, we have to put 5,000 to 10,000 hours of practice in. That is about what it would require for me to become a concert solo violinist!! I am not a nun, live a normally responsible life with luckily perhaps more time on my hands than many. But not that much time to do this full-time. So, if I want to count the hours of practice in a day, how do I do it? This morning I put in 40 minutes of sitting, concentration on breathing. During the day, I am constantly going in and out of mindfulness awareness. Do I count this? if I am struggling all day to harness my wandering mind? I learned about noting from another thread, and find this a conducive method of identifying and deconstructing thoughts that impact and set off dukka. During the night I have an on and off practice of awakening, and settling into concentration and observation of breathing which then collapses into sleep.

I don't have the Wallace book on hand today, but in general, he stated that after the second phase, it was really necessary to really put in those 8 or more hours a day if you want to get anywhere with this.

Is that what you do? Is that what everyone is doing?
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dream walker, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Carole Lindberg:
Before I found this book, - and this site,- I had begun and given up on meditation many times, being always lost in the effort of stilling and returning from my ever wandering thoughts.

Think of each time you become aware of your thoughts and move your mind back to breath as one curl with a dumbbell. It will take many repetitions to strengthen your awareness. As your awareness gets stronger, you will be able to "place" it on things for longer amounts of time. The more you note the faster your curls go and the faster your awareness gets stronger. This is how insite helps concentration.
Hope the analogy helps
~D
Mario Nistri, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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So, I'm quoting Daniel answering the question:

in the end from my point of view, the key is to attain to the untangling of the knot of perception, and this can be done on way less hard-core samatha jhana than Dr. Wallace advocates, though being a hard-core dharma fan, I do appreciate in very general terms his love of very high standards.


and

I got stream entry on way less concentration than this. I had no visuzlization abilities, couldn't have done anything even close to this, and yet my moment-to-moment concentration was very strong and clearly sufficient. My concentration at that point was miles below Wallace's standards, and yet somehow it was more than sufficient for what I was looking for. Thus, I think that, while it is always fun to have a high bar just to see if one can do it, one must ask what is the value of that bar if the core goal can be achieved on far less. I can attain to Nirodha Samapatti but have never yet sat in a jhana for 24 hours. There is a flaw in his model regards timing.


I think almost no-one here have ever tried such an hardcore training, so... don't worry!
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Hi Carole,
Carole Lindberg:

I have an inquiry about the time put against practice. As Mr. Wallace says, for us to get into a deep level of samatha practice, we have to put 5,000 to 10,000 hours of practice in. That is about what it would require for me to become a concert solo violinist!! I am not a nun, live a normally responsible life with luckily perhaps more time on my hands than many. But not that much time to do this full-time.

Well I haven't attain stream entry yet. And one of the main points in that essay is that I think we should go by the traditional definition of jhana. But that doesn't mean you have to be able to sit for 24hrs! What it means is you need to be able to get to access concentration which is around 4hrs. Also it does mean you have to sit for 4hrs every time it just means that if you want to you can to some lvl of consistency. It is likely often at around sits of about 4hrs that stream entry will occur (though some people reach the lvl of concentration required without doing a sit like that). This is because there concentration & mindfulness is consistent and undistracted. Or because they have a high proclivity towards concentration, goes deep, quickly and easily. Its my feeling that once you get to being able to do 2hrs sits with some consistency that the leap to 3 or 4 hrs may not be that hard, in terms of concentration. This is because it is very peaceful and very pleasant, you don't become tired, your circulation and easy of body is extremely pliant. Along with this you have less 'need' for sleep, and will not tire late into the night or through!

I don't have the Wallace book on hand today, but in general, he stated that after the second phase, it was really necessary to really put in those 8 or more hours a day if you want to get anywhere with this.

Is that what you do? Is that what everyone is doing?

So the journey starts with building up the practice slowly! One step at a time! Sitting for and hour is a standard that is encouraged with new meditators, not moving without back support and preferable on the ground cross legged. At that point your at about stage 4 and a nimitta may arise and extend the sit into stage 5 and being able to sit of maybe and 1 hr & ½. Sorry I didn't check that, it was sort of of the top of my head.

It helps and seems to be a common standard that for serious development in the dry insight tradition of practice; that a person sits for at least 2hrs a day, but really 4 to 6hr (this is not one continuous sit but the amount of time committed to meditation, sitting or walking) is need for any really chance at breaking out of the dark night into stream entry. Also all that in between time driving your car, waiting in a reception, walking need to be done with strong mindfulness. In daily life, engaging with the world I doubt anything but systematic noting could keep your attention with the bare sensations of the body. But even though I'm not a big fan of conceptual noting in my practice, I like the author Jack Kornfield's description of how meditate doing noting in "A Path with a Heart"

So one of the last points is that, the jump from access concentration, which is around 4hrs into Jhana or Stream-Entry can occur at that point. Stream-Entry is a type of Jhana, but possibly or likely easier to attain that actual full jhana, which should be at a most basic lvl to be seen around 8 hrs. Though again I need to remind you in case you didn't get it the first time, that time is not that state of attainment. And it can be reached and returned from in a short period also.

Don't forget Metta is considered a Samatha practice and can and is used by the neo-buddhist tradition or teachers Such as Jack Kornfield, Sharon Salzburg, Joseph Goldstein & Michelle McDonald. My main point is in modern day western insight practice, there is a tendency to help the meditator, by teaching them some Samatha to mediate the intensity that arises during insight practice.

So you start with little steps in the moment not longing for the future attainment, which is a serious obstacle yet at the same time using these skill sets and maps to aim for the attainment (Keep in mind that the maps, weren't originally taught to new students, and some time basic practices were merely given, keeping that in mind start with some basic practices). But also, for a period, it would probably most often be required, for you to do some longer retreats, of two weeks, a month or two or even three months.

I believe it is attainable, not based on faith but real testimonies from others that have walked the path before me in this day an age from traditional and neo-buddhist backgrounds. I hope that path is an easy one for you, because maybe in past lives you refined your skills & virtues/ i.e. your bloody lucky & talented. Kind Regards Neem.
A D R, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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neem nyima:

So the journey starts with building up the practice slowly! One step at a time! Sitting for and hour is a standard that is encouraged with new meditators, not moving without back support and preferable on the ground cross legged. At that point your at about stage 4 and a nimitta may arise and extend the sit into stage 5 and being able to sit of maybe and 1 hr & ½. Sorry I didn't check that, it was sort of of the top of my head.



This statement really brings up some frustration and skepticism for me because I have done a decent number of sits past the 1.5 hour mark and never have I been able to lock onto a nimitta.

The longest session I have done without moving my spinal column was around 7.5 hours (on my back). That was last fall around November sometime. I had been doing lengthier and lengthier sessions before then. I got to the point where I was really altered and started seeing visions and what not but I hit a wall right about the time that this rainbow band phenomena showed up. Before that my somewhat translucent visions had been in black and white.

Needless to say, the session brought on tremendous pain and a huge bought of anger and that anger has been growing stronger and stronger ever since. It has really destabilized my practice and I can't even sit 5 minutes to date.

Now, with all this in mind I had considered myself at stage 6 working towards stage 7 based on my interpretations of Wallace's descriptions in the book. If you wanted I could give you my rational.

Also, I thought stream entry equated with say, stage 3-4 of Wallaces model?
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fivebells ., modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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A D R:
This statement really brings up some frustration and skepticism for me because I have done a decent number of sits past the 1.5 hour mark and never have I been able to lock onto a nimitta.


The time spent is more of a diagnostic for the success of the practice, not a part of the method.

The nimitta is a fabrication. You can fabricate your own. If you're having trouble locking on to one, you probably haven't chosen one which is pleasant enough.

A D R:
Needless to say, the session brought on tremendous pain and a huge bought of anger and that anger has been growing stronger and stronger ever since. It has really destabilized my practice and I can't even sit 5 minutes to date.


Does metta practice help? A metta-related nimitta would probably be a good idea.
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Carole Lindberg, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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I am new to samatha but not new to other spiritual practice. Thank you for your careful observations about how I should pace myself.

My question is about your current situation of not being able to sit without opening up large pockets of anger. My experience before setting down to concentrate on breath was often centered on the heart. I learned this when I began to practice with ayahuasca as a healing/teaching plant and sacrament. The plant entity did not allow me into the inner sanctum of virtual imaginal splendor until I worked on issues of strengthening the heart with light, gratitude and forgiveness, and sending metta to myself and others.

I mention the above as I think that working on strengthening compassion of the heart for ourselves and others is extremely grounding - definitely healing - and should always be included as a vital and continual part of our spirtual practice. Perhaps a change of focus this way will align you with the path of your practice again. The reward of working with the heart is that it feels so good. Anger and stress really are awful turn-offs, I agree.
A D R, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Carole Lindberg:
I am new to samatha but not new to other spiritual practice. Thank you for your careful observations about how I should pace myself.

My question is about your current situation of not being able to sit without opening up large pockets of anger. My experience before setting down to concentrate on breath was often centered on the heart. I learned this when I began to practice with ayahuasca as a healing/teaching plant and sacrament. The plant entity did not allow me into the inner sanctum of virtual imaginal splendor until I worked on issues of strengthening the heart with light, gratitude and forgiveness, and sending metta to myself and others.

I mention the above as I think that working on strengthening compassion of the heart for ourselves and others is extremely grounding - definitely healing - and should always be included as a vital and continual part of our spirtual practice. Perhaps a change of focus this way will align you with the path of your practice again. The reward of working with the heart is that it feels so good. Anger and stress really are awful turn-offs, I agree.


Thank you for your kind response.

I agree that the heart is very important in the spiritual process.

One of the challenges I have faced in my own process is learning how to love myself (not to mention others) without the strings of attachment. To do this requires deep healing and the medicine is at times bitter and unpleasant. Faith seems to be important here. The old Bible verse "walk by faith, not by sight" came into mind today, and that is kind of how it feels.
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fivebells ., modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Wow you guys said a lot of stuff. A D R, but you need to read what I wrote a little much more carefully. As the point was, these sits are easy to sit, as they get longer. If they are not, your pushing your self, to hard probably! The method of jhana requires the 'foundations' of relaxation, the 'walls' of stability; meaning staying with the object and lastly the 'roof' of clarity; meaning seeing the object clearly.

You can't have clarity without stability.

You can have stability without relaxation.

ADR please read everything carefully this will help and improve your practice if you can understand different approaches to practice.
Start with, going back to the start. With regard to your practice, focus not on results but on 'relaxing in the now'.

You may fall asleep that's okay. But slowly you will learn to balance this laxity with attention/alertness/stability.

The two problems that inhibit the development of meditation, are laxity and excitation. If your angry your not relaxed and you may as well stop and learn to relax! This principle of laxity and excitation is a really helpful one for both concentration & insight practice!!!

There are traditions that use the pushing approach but when pushing through pain to get concentration, you can merely develop hatred dosa etc (or in the opposite case as with bliss associated affects: can merely cause clinging). The result is no Nimitta and no strong concentration.

My nimitta is a bit vague as it is space! yes that is a valid nimitta. But I can get hopeful and perceive the nature of having my eyes closed, as being spacious.
But when the actual Nimitta occurs, the body has spacious ease & lightness or also sometimes, the awareness of the body disappears all together. One feels as though one is floating in space, merely a consciousness in a void, but if you question this you can begin to notice the body and its light subtle sensations, you can then take a nimitta like this right through to jhana, so I've read and been told. Traditionally, when the nimitta becomes fully developed, that is all you can perceive.

The Dry Insighter's would call this spacious awareness that can still perceive the body when attention is directed or looked for, as a light 5th jhana. I say it is merely a jhanic factor or a nimitta, keep in mind the two can be interchangeable i.e. joy. But to be fair to Ingram, and the comments he made in the 1st link above, there is be a blurry line in between, these two ideas, even though I prefer the stricture definition.

Lately as i am not in retreat, i am merely sitting for 30 min to 1 hr often, merely a few times a day. I'm trying to allow the practice to develop to the point where i want to sit, because it is relaxing and pleasant.
I have a strong tendency towards insight, so keeping the mind calm means, whether i become 'a little bit fixed' or 'investigative' doesn't matter, as the mind is calm, CALM!!!

Please A D R keep the mind calm stay relaxed. Maybe sit for 30 mins, have a rest, start again; if your enjoying it, you can sit a bit longer. As your getting better and have done what I said, maybe for a few weeks if there is some medium pain and the mind is still calm, you could extend your sits beyond and an hour. But look at the mind, when you develop concentration, 'notice' the subtle anger and aversion to pain that is arising and getting stronger. If it is, your not relaxed enough! Read all this shit, like at least 3 times ADR, because you totally missed the point here! Which you need to take some responsibility for, if you want to understand how to develop your practice, without possibly going crazy or damaging your body, or both.

Best Wishes, good luck, I'm still learning too, so please wish it for me if you will, too. Kind regards neem. Another Dark Night Yogi.
A D R, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Thanks neem,

Good stuff. I think relaxation is important, especially for people who are on the more tightly strung side. I am letting up a bit intensity wise today.
A D R, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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I guess when the descriptions say "sessions," I don't interpret that to have to mean sitting without moving. I mean, I walk around most of the day in complete anxiety because my world and mind are getting ripped to shreds. Concentration during such periods is the only way I don't lose it and go jump off a cliff.
A D R, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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...And forcing my body to sit still detracts me from that concentration.
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fivebells ., modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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A D R, it sounds like you are in serious trouble. Do you have an experienced teacher to talk to about your practice?
A D R, modified 7 Years ago.

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fivebells .:
A D R, it sounds like you are in serious trouble. Do you have an experienced teacher to talk to about your practice?


No. I'll be fine I'm sure. I probably need to not post on here maybe. Its a big temptation for me though. Although I might just be beating myself up over nothing. It's not entirely clear sometimes.
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fivebells ., modified 7 Years ago.

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neem nyima:
Stream-Entry is a type of Jhana, but possibly or likely easier to attain that actual full jhana


What is the basis for this claim?
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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fivebells .:
neem nyima:
Stream-Entry is a type of Jhana, but possibly or likely easier to attain that actual full jhana


What is the basis for this claim?


Sorry bro,(Fivebells) i don't remember the name of the book I read, where i first found that out, as i was in the middle of a retreat, and reading to much (MBMC library), when I probably should have been meditating more, but I was going a bit crazy and it seemed help, though it didn't help me get path. The reading that is.

This is a fact, I've talked about it with others, maybe some of the more academic people can tell you where to read this in the traditional texts. Basically the attainment of path is through a jhana as well as an insight door, i.e one of the three characteristics. Why do you think the Samatha Yanika's go on about the need for it so much?
So when one attains path it is in the aspect of one of the 8 jhanas, then with a dominant door of one of the three characteristics and a latent door of a second characteristic. So eg. first jhana, impermanence & unsatisfactoriness, may be one of the combinations.

Apologies that i didn't write down the name of that book at the time. Best of Luck confirming that, Five Bells!

Kind Regards, Neem
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fivebells ., modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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No worries, Neem. I agree -- probably more than most here -- that jhana is critical to the path. However, it is a factor of the path, not the path itself. The event of stream entry is not a type of jhana.
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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The classical source for the distinction between the two vehicles of serenity and insight is the Visuddhimagga where it is explained that when a meditator begins the development of wisdom "if firstly, his vehicle is serenity, [he] should emerge from any fine-material or immaterial jhana except the base consisting of neither-perception-nor-non-perception, and he should discern, according to characteristic, function, etc. the jhana factors consisting of applied thought, etc. and the states associated with them" (Vism. 557; PP679-80). Other commentarial passages allow access concentration to suffice for the vehicle of serenity, but the last immaterial jhana is excluded because its factors are too subtle to be discerned. The meditator whose vehicle is pure insight, on the other hand, is advised to start directly by discerning material and mental phenomena, beginning with the four elements, without utilizing a jhana for this purpose (Vism. 558; PP.680). Thus the samathayanika first attains access concentration or mundane jhana and then develops insight knowledge, by means of which he reaches the supramundane path containing wisdom under the heading of right view, and supramundane jhana under the heading of right concentration. The vipassanayanika, in contrast, skips over mundane jhana and goes directly into insight contemplation. When he reaches the end of the progression of insight knowledge he arrives at the supramundane path which, as in the previous case, brings together wisdom with supramundane jhana. This jhana counts as his accomplishment of serenity.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/gunaratana/wheel351.html#ch5

looking for some more
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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The supramundane paths and fruits always arise as states of jhanic consciousness. They occur as states of jhana because they contain within themselves the jhana factors elevated to an intensity corresponding to that of the jhana factors in the mundane jhanas. Since they possess the jhana factors these states are able to fix upon their object with the force of full absorption. Thence, taking the absorptive force of the jhana factors as the criterion, the paths and fruits may be reckoned as belonging to either the first, second, third or fourth jhana of the fourfold scheme, or to the first, second, third, fourth or fifth jhana of the fivefold scheme.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/gunaratana/wheel351.html#ch5
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Its hard to find that stuff, so I'll just leave it at access to insight, there will be other references in other books, but I'll leave that for you to double check. emoticon Kind Regards Neem
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fivebells ., modified 7 Years ago.

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Thanks for the pointer, Neem. This is a very interesting terminology, plus it got me to read some of that book, which I have been meaning to do for ages.

Gunaratana:
This last phrase points to a striking difference between mundane and supramundane jhana. The Dhammasangani's exposition of the former begins: "On the occasion when one develops the path for rebirth in the fine-material sphere... one enters and dwells in the first jhana" [my italics]. Thus, with this statement, mundane jhana is shown to sustain the round of rebirths; it is a wholesome kamma leading to renewed existence. But the supramundane jhana of the path does not promote the continuation of the round.


This is the reason I said that jhana is not part of "the event of stream entry" (a "fruition moment" in his terminology.) I meant mundane jhana in his terminology, which cannot be part of stream entry because it is a becoming. Supramundane jhana is not a concept I am familiar with, and I don't get a clear idea from Gunaratana's writing what it means. It appears from the sources he appeals to that it is an abhidhammic concept without much basis in the Pali suttas, which is what I have primarily studied through Thanissaro's writings. Supramundane jhana as a factor of the path is a really interesting idea, though. Transcendent right view as a factor of the path plays a very important role in my thinking, and I could see transcendent jhana being equally useful from a practice perspective if I could get a handle on what it means exactly.
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Interesting thoughts, Fivebells,

Yeah I thought or presumed it was a an abhidhamma thing too, and not defined in such precise terms with in the early sutta, or in any of the teachings spoken by the buddha. Yeah that is the reason that after attaining supramundane stream-entry that it is easier to begin to master jhana because it is in the aspect of a jhana.
The supramundane paths and fruits always arise as states of jhanic consciousness. They occur as states of jhana because they contain within themselves the jhana factors elevated to an intensity corresponding to that of the jhana factors in the mundane jhanas.
So some of the thoughts I've conceived about attaining stream entry are in direct relationship to traditional notions of access concentration which also bares exact correlation to high equanimity in the dry insight tradition, being about 4hrs minimum as an external bench mark. So it is likely or common to be able to sit that long around high equanimity. That is the impression i got from those two Sayadaw who told me i should be able to sit for around four hours, and I'm not in high equanimity, as i was sitting only 2 & ½.
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neem nyima, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: The Attention Revolution by B. Alan Wallace

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Thanks for that link!

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