A hymn.

James ., modified 7 Years ago.

A hymn.

Posts: 225 Join Date: 3/31/14 Recent Posts
I remember long time ago in early 2009 when I had first encountered the work of Dr. Ingram, I was at a shit stage in my life after having gone through several life-fuck-up events. I was struck my the sincerity and honesty, however, of what Dr. Ingram was saying. I did not practice however, and was rather negligent, I was a believer however.

When I started participating, I was shunned because I was not a practitioner, but nowadays I'm accepted, because I am one.

I remember reading stories about yogis who would come here, they would be haughty and full-headed, perhaps they would make outlandish statements, but after a time their heart would subside and they would become respected.

I saw the transformation of many a individual into harmless beings, benefiting both themselves and others.

I remember the two magicians from the UK who recounted their experiences and their stories.

I remember Kenneth weighing in on discussions regarding controversies, I remember many respected, senior practitioners weighing in on controversies skillfully, leading to the subsiding of tension as opposed to the proliferation of it.

I remember Stef and the purity of her aura after she announced her new found freedom.

I remember Nikolai, and his inspiring achievements at KFDh and here.

I remember Tarin and his humor as well as my fondness for him.

I remember Hokai and Vince Horn, two practitioners who's accomplishments, it is not my place to measure.

I remember Florian, and my fondness for him as the "Ananda" of this forum.

I remember too much, I read this forum assiduously and watched it go through this decline. And I take some responsbility for that.

For the Buddha Dharma to survive, its adherents must be practitioners. Otherwise our professions of being Dharma practitioners will be in vain.

Sincerely,

James
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Daniel M. Ingram, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: A hymn.

Posts: 3199 Join Date: 4/20/09 Recent Posts
Your sentiment mirrors my own feelings, your recollections are fond ones for me also. Thanks for the post,

Daniel
x x, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: A hymn.

Posts: 122 Join Date: 8/18/13 Recent Posts
Amen.
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Jason Snyder, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: A hymn.

Posts: 186 Join Date: 10/25/13 Recent Posts
I am curious. You mentioned in another post that you are a born again Christian and you proclaimed the Dharma to be dead. How does that integrate with your interest in meditation and interaction with strivers who think that they can save themselves?
James ., modified 7 Years ago.

RE: A hymn.

Posts: 225 Join Date: 3/31/14 Recent Posts
Jason,

That's a very good question that I am happy to answer. Yes, I do believe that the Dharma of Gotama (his sasana) has been phased out, is deprecated. So I don't believe in the 'saving grace' of the sasana anymore. Rather I believe that salvation is only attained through Christ: "I am the way, the truth, and the life."

However! The texts still remain, and this does not negate the efficacy of the practices of said texts. I still have classical Buddhist insights, I still experience parts of the four limbs of stream winning (minus the morality part, but the texts often state worldlings are those in whom the limbs are "in altogether, and in every way lacking"), I still discern the indriya, but do not possess them fully, nor have I completed them.

In short, I believe that is impossible to be fully Buddhist, like it was in the past. So while I do believe it is possible to resurrect ghosts, or watch "old history tapes" and experience what the saints of old did. I do not believe that the sasana is still in effect, I believe it to be dead.

Attempts to resurrect it, are viewed by me as futile. Christ is the way to go. I only have peace of mind, and freedom from fear of hell, when recollecting my Christianity.

However I do have powerful non-dual experiences, Christianity does not negate the existence of mysticism, it does negate the existence of righteous people however, "all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God." Furthermore it states that powers are bad, and are pretty much toxic.

Peace.
x x, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: A hymn.

Posts: 122 Join Date: 8/18/13 Recent Posts
Not so much amen.
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Jason Snyder, modified 7 Years ago.

RE: A hymn.

Posts: 186 Join Date: 10/25/13 Recent Posts
James .:
Jason,

That's a very good question that I am happy to answer. Yes, I do believe that the Dharma of Gotama (his sasana) has been phased out, is deprecated. So I don't believe in the 'saving grace' of the sasana anymore. Rather I believe that salvation is only attained through Christ: "I am the way, the truth, and the life."

However! The texts still remain, and this does not negate the efficacy of the practices of said texts. I still have classical Buddhist insights, I still experience parts of the four limbs of stream winning (minus the morality part, but the texts often state worldlings are those in whom the limbs are "in altogether, and in every way lacking"), I still discern the indriya, but do not possess them fully, nor have I completed them.

In short, I believe that is impossible to be fully Buddhist, like it was in the past. So while I do believe it is possible to resurrect ghosts, or watch "old history tapes" and experience what the saints of old did. I do not believe that the sasana is still in effect, I believe it to be dead.

Attempts to resurrect it, are viewed by me as futile. Christ is the way to go. I only have peace of mind, and freedom from fear of hell, when recollecting my Christianity.

However I do have powerful non-dual experiences, Christianity does not negate the existence of mysticism, it does negate the existence of righteous people however, "all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God." Furthermore it states that powers are bad, and are pretty much toxic.

Peace.
Fair enough. The thing I like about meditation is that you can really believe anything you want and still make progress on the path of insight. Cheers.