How to actually train equanimity?

Pavel Pek, modified 2 Months ago.

How to actually train equanimity?

Posts: 12 Join Date: 8/22/21 Recent Posts
Hello folks, I am new here. I have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, which is now mild after I've done a lot of therapy on it over the last 15 years. However, I've found it hard to concentrate due to it most of my life. Since today I feel like higher equanimity could benefit me greatly in my case. I would like to ask if there is some equanimity meditation or something that you would recommend and how even equanimity plays into concentration? Usually, it seems as if equanimity is written about as a by-product developed through concentration practices such as following the breath in and out where you always bring the focus back on that breath (or another meditation object of choice) wherever it drifts away. However, in my practice, it seems like my equanimity is very, very low and it's actually hindering my concentration in the first place. Is there a way to actually train equanimity in a sitting practice prior to actually even training concentration? 
George S, modified 2 Months ago.

RE: How to actually train equanimity?

Posts: 2064 Join Date: 2/26/19 Recent Posts
Well equanimity is defined as accepting whatever is actually happening right now, without ignoring it, clinging to it or pushing it away. In this case, what seems to be happening is that "concentration" is being judged for not meeting some kind externalized standard. Equanimity would be accepting that concentration just is what it is in the moment. If you adopt that kind of attitude then concentration will naturally deepen over time, otherwise you are just fighting with yourself and it will never be "good enough".
shargrol, modified 2 Months ago.

RE: How to actually train equanimity?

Posts: 1620 Join Date: 2/8/16 Recent Posts
George S
Well equanimity is defined as accepting whatever is actually happening right now, without ignoring it, clinging to it or pushing it away. In this case, what seems to be happening is that "concentration" is being judged for not meeting some kind externalized standard. Equanimity would be accepting that concentration just is what it is in the moment. If you adopt that kind of attitude then concentration will naturally deepen over time, otherwise you are just fighting with yourself and it will never be "good enough".

Well said.

Equanimity is basically getting used to saying "yes" to whatever arises during a sit.

But there really needs to be interest/curiousity about what is happening... sometimes people get used to saying "meh" to whatever arises --- this isn't equanimity.  

Equanimity is interest an acceptance and curiousity/investigation. "Wow, this is what life is like. Wow, this is what my mind is like. This really is how things are right now. What IS this?"
A. Dietrich Ringle, modified 2 Months ago.

RE: How to actually train equanimity?

Posts: 882 Join Date: 12/4/11 Recent Posts
Pavel Pek
Hello folks, I am new here. I have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, which is now mild after I've done a lot of therapy on it over the last 15 years. However, I've found it hard to concentrate due to it most of my life. Since today I feel like higher equanimity could benefit me greatly in my case. I would like to ask if there is some equanimity meditation or something that you would recommend and how even equanimity plays into concentration? Usually, it seems as if equanimity is written about as a by-product developed through concentration practices such as following the breath in and out where you always bring the focus back on that breath (or another meditation object of choice) wherever it drifts away. However, in my practice, it seems like my equanimity is very, very low and it's actually hindering my concentration in the first place. Is there a way to actually train equanimity in a sitting practice prior to actually even training concentration? 
It sounds like you have developed access concentration over time and now you are nearing jhana. Any jhana can produce equinimity, so be patient. First jhana would be a great place to start. The way I enter it is to formalize a plan in my head, and realize that that plan has already been made.

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