Rigpa Mental Habits

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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/10/22 5:09 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/10/22 5:09 PM

Rigpa Mental Habits

Posts: 13 Join Date: 9/23/19 Recent Posts
Just coming back to practice after a hiatus and I'm noticing some mental habits around rigpa, does anyone have advice for dealing with these?
  1. Constantly trying to feel it more 'strongly'/judging how 'strong' it is currently
  2. Assumption that I know exactly what it's supposed to feel like and when it's 'working well' and when it's not
  3. Constant attempts by ego to conceptualize and create strategies around the experience
My current thinking is to attempt to let go of wanting more knowledge, quality and quantity of rigpa, and also to not judge any component of practice on any level. I rarely converse with other meditators so please excuse my framing/language and correct me if something seems off.

Many thanks
Stephen, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 2:24 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 2:24 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Vidya(skt), rigpa (tbt) means knowledge of the basis. There are different ways it is used in the texts, but for simplicity this will suffice. Perhaps do not focus so much on the "goal" of rigpa/vidya and more on the afflictions that are obscuring the knowledge. In Dzogchen, liberation means you're free of the afflicted obscuration, no longer subjected to afflicted behavior. This is different than buddhahood, which is freedom of knowledge obscuration. 

I think for the particular affliction you're dealing with, focusing on the afflictions, what is causing you to grasp at this supposed special state that you, may or may not believe, is different from what you are experiencing right now. What is preventing you from resting in equanimity, the peace of what is happening right now? In that investigation you may find some aspects to focus on. Perhaps more loving kindness practice, perhaps more concentration, perhaps more faith in the teachings, perhaps more motivation, perhaps more generosity of spirit, perhaps less doubt about your ability. I'm not sure, but any of these may be helpful. Do you have a teacher? A good teacher will help you and save you potentially years of confusion. 
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 2:44 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 2:44 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Dominic, it would really help to have some detail about your practice. For example, are you practicing in a Tibetan lineage? What kinds of practices have you done? For how long?

​​​​​​​TIA
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 5:40 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 5:38 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

Posts: 13 Join Date: 9/23/19 Recent Posts
  • "what is causing you to grasp at this supposed special state that you, may or may not believe, is different from what you are experiencing right now"
    • Possibly attachtment to attainment, beliefs that tie my self worth to meditation prowess/progress. Perhaps holding on to the experience as a light during dark times has created attatchment. That's what comes to mind
  • "Perhaps more loving kindness practice, perhaps more concentration, perhaps more faith in the teachings, perhaps more motivation, perhaps more generosity of spirit, perhaps less doubt about your ability"
    • All good things to think about. More concentration to reduce the frequency of thought makes sense to me. I don't believe i have an issue with faith, perhaps i just need to focus on the right teachings, although i may be filtering through doubt in a subtle way. I don't have much experience with metta, can you explain why you think it might help?
    • I think i picked up these habits through my process of a lot of striving and attempting to achieve realisation, now the relationship between the experience, and the ego craving more and trying to understand it, keeps reappreaing
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 5:57 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 5:56 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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I'm self taught, never had a teacher, practiced instensely for a year before it got a bit much and I stopped doing formal practice for about 3 years. The techniques i did the most were: Non-meditation, vipassana/3 marks stuff, anapana, body work/chakras and no self once I had access. No self is what got me into meditation and it was my long-term goal from the beginning. Before I stopped I was starting on the infinite space jhana, could summon 4th jhana pretty fast, 3rd eye, crown and heart charka felt strongly, a few rapture experiences, good access to rigpa with my eyes open, especially the perception of space/complex objects moving slowly through space.
Stephen, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 6:07 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 6:05 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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  • "Possibly attachtment to attainment, beliefs that tie my self worth to meditation prowess/progress. Perhaps holding on to the experience as a light during dark times has created attatchment. That's what comes to mind"
Metta is a great antidote to having the limiting belief that your self worth is tied to meditation progress. Connecting with positive intention--positive intent for others and for yourself--can be a great way to unbind that connection and allow you to find the positive intent in each moment, unconditioned by how your meditation is going specifically. Beginning each meditation session with this intention and focusing on radiating this energy throughout the session, without grasping it, will grease the wheels of your practice and make everything flow more easily. 

It can be helpful to increase your concentration, but remember that metta is a concentration practice too, you can focus on the breath, you can focus on loving-kindness, you can focus on feelings in your body, it's all good. I like how Stephen Snyder teaches the Jhanas as a metta practice. He has taught them for many years and seems to have the most success with metta as the object. But be patient. Don't expect that you will see results the day you start the practice. Patience is one of the 10 paramitas so cultivating patience is a key part of the path. Here is a guided meditations in case you're interested. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_3r7Rd7Nro&t=108s
Stephen, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 6:10 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 6:10 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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I would also highly recommend listening to Rob Burbeas Practicing the Jhanas, especially since it sounds like you have experience with them. His presentation of the jhanas is my favorite and I know a lot of practitioners who have benefitted from these teachings. They were one of the last retreat recordings he made before he passed. 

https://dharmaseed.org/retreats/4496/
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 6:39 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 6:39 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

Posts: 13 Join Date: 9/23/19 Recent Posts
Thank you for the recommendation, I will definitely check it out. I always felt more connected to the equinimity side of the brahmaviharas, probably due to anicca practice, do you think this would be equally effective? (not necessarily as a replacement but to accompany). Can I frame a session with the same intention but with equinimity? What effect would you expect that to have?
Stephen, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 9:59 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 9:58 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Can I frame a session with the same intention but with equinimity? What effect would you expect that to have?
It would likely be more challenging to use equanimity, especially if that is your preference. Because you have a preference I suspect loving kindness, sympathetic joy, or compassion would be beneficial as well, maybe more so. I would expect there to be less of a strong feeling of positive intent with only equanimity. Do you find you have much piti or sukha arise when you practice?
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 10:48 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 10:48 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

Posts: 13 Join Date: 9/23/19 Recent Posts
Yes, I suspected it would be more challenging but I was curious. I wasn't familiar with the terms piti and sukha, but i guess i would associate these feelings with specific techniques with generous overlap. Im doing more open eye no-self practice now which I find stimulating and creates a lot of piti, I switch back and forth between techniques quickly while im practicing, and I am also just returning to practice, both i feel are contributing. Although at my peak, my long sessions were very sukha dominant.
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Not two, not one, modified 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 11:45 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/11/22 11:45 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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My advice follows, for what it is worth.

The difficulties you describe are associated with contraction. The solutions presented here are all meditations with the aspect of expansion, which is indeed the antidote to contraction. It is also good to practice noticing when your mind is contracted, and when it is expanded (this is one of the practices of the third foundation of mindfulness in the Satipatthana Sutta).  Become used to being able to observe this, and being able to flick between expansion (e.g. metta) and contraction (e.g. meditation on breath at the tip of the nose).  Accept that sometimes you will need to be contracted for daily tasks (unless you are a monastic), and at this point the ground of being will hardly be noticeable.  Accept that it may pop back out when you cease those tasks, or may not. It doesn't really matter. Cling to nothing (neither contraction nor expansion) and cultivate a substrate of mild joy and compassion throughout the day.  If you don't cling to rigpa, your mind will be quiter, and it will be more likely to manifest. When it does manifest, lightly maintain it to burn in the neural pathways. 

If you suspect you don't really have rigpa established, practice more continuous mindfulness. Try light touch observation of the flickering sensations of your somatic nervous system at 20 hz a second for 72 hours continuously. Then watch unnoticed contractions just evaporate.  Also try shifting your consciousness around your body (e.g. hands, buttocks, feet, skin), and into objects (computer, chair, ground, wind, lights, vehicles, sounds). Then let you senses open out into an expanded world.

Alternatively, just read MCTB2 again!  :-)

Metta (except when I am dwelling in a contracted realm).

Malcolm
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/12/22 2:19 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/12/22 2:19 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

Posts: 13 Join Date: 9/23/19 Recent Posts
  • It is also good to practice noticing when your mind is contracted, and when it is expanded
    • Thank you, I am finding this very helpful. I am noticing that if I exert effort in accessing rigpa, it can feel narrower as in part i am trying to use the perception of an object in space to trigger the experience. But with the framing of expansiveness, there is a nice contrast that is recognised after a thought, recognition of contraction and an immediate noticing of the exansiveness of rigpa. 
  • being able to flick between expansion (e.g. metta) and contraction (e.g. meditation on breath at the tip of the nose
  • Cling to nothing (neither contraction nor expansion) and cultivate a substrate of mild joy and compassion throughout the day
    • I will work on these
  • If you don't cling to rigpa, your mind will be quiter, and it will be more likely to manifest. When it does manifest, lightly maintain it to burn in the neural pathways. 
    • Yes I am finding recently that if I create a state of relaxed noticing, and pretty much forget about rigpa, then it manifests more. 
    • I was also certainly exerting a lot of unncesssary effort to maintain the experience. Doing it lightly feels much more natural and effective.
All very helpful advice, thank you for assisting me
Stephen, modified 1 Year ago at 12/13/22 10:20 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/13/22 10:20 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Dominic Rocks
Yes, I suspected it would be more challenging but I was curious. I wasn't familiar with the terms piti and sukha, but i guess i would associate these feelings with specific techniques with generous overlap. Im doing more open eye no-self practice now which I find stimulating and creates a lot of piti, I switch back and forth between techniques quickly while im practicing, and I am also just returning to practice, both i feel are contributing. Although at my peak, my long sessions were very sukha dominant.

Piti and sukha need not be associated with a particular technique, but as your practice develops you may notice more sukha predominating and it's important not to grasp that. But if you are doing brahmaviharas and even with equanimity as you're main practice it can be helpful to simply rest in the sukha as it radiates in space. That can help with the grasping after states. Of course your practice will not always be characterized by lots of sukha. That's where the cultivation of loving kindness, compassion, and joy can come in and be a stabilizer. Other things that help me is finding a dharma song or chanting to help open the channels and reinforce the neural pathways. Song and chanting is a big part of the Dzogchen tradition. Somatic practices around the channels as well have been helpful. Qi Gong, tai chi, yoga can all be helpful. Trul Khor, Tsa Lung as well if you can find a teacher. Not sure this is what you're interested in but just putting it out there in case it's of interest.
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Not two, not one, modified 1 Year ago at 12/14/22 11:22 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/14/22 11:22 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Glad the advice was helpful!   How's it going now?

Malcolm
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/15/22 9:49 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/15/22 9:30 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

Posts: 13 Join Date: 9/23/19 Recent Posts
  • My rigpa is definitely starting to feel more expansive and accessible, and i find myself thinking about it less and just letting it happen when it happens. Though I must say, through starting to tune back into the moment of phenomena arising, this expansiveness seems to be accentuating it's jarring nature, which i sometimes find unpleasant when i can't tune it out/forget about it. For example, sometimes when i read something, i get caught flicking back and forth between the perception of vision and perception of the thought saying the words along with it. Still a new experience but that's my best description for now anyway, this makes reading difficult at times. 
  • Cultivating joy and compassion has been the most useful for me and I thank you again for the advice. With this new cycle I'd like to focus more on the Love path than the Wisdom path if that makes sense, although of course you cannot seperate them haha. I have a different approach to all of them but I try and evoke either metta, joy, compassion, gratitude, or equanimity and then lightly maintain it, through making the emotion the object of attention and relating it to things im experiencing and perceiving in the world. Although i am finding some much easier than others, with joy and gratitude most of the time it seems i just tune into it and it manifests. Equanimity and compassion I find easier if i've built up one of the others first. Metta is interesting, I'd like to know more about how it relates to rigpa and what kind of perspective/techniques can be applied here, i've had two seperate heightened experiences of talking to another person, where the two combine in a profoundly beautiful way.
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Not two, not one, modified 1 Year ago at 12/15/22 2:36 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/15/22 2:36 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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 "Though I must say, through starting to tune back into the moment of phenomena arising, this expansiveness seems to be accentuating it's jarring nature, which i sometimes find unpleasant when i can't tune it out/forget about it. For example, sometimes when i read something, i get caught flicking back and forth between the perception of vision and perception of the thought saying the words along with it."

Hmmn. You may be mixing two practices here. Discrimination of arising is a contracted practice and observing thoughts in reaction to sensations is a contracted practice. These target a different aspect of dependent origination to Rigpa. And when you are in an expansive insightful state, contracted formations are indeed jarring.

So RIgpa is not initally about arising, or passing away, it is more about "it is" - dwelling purely in the sensations, and rebalancing your self to be completely open and spacious and non-separate, with the bliss no longer residing in the mind or body but insead out there in the sea of sense consciousness. You are nothing but 'your' sensations, and the world is nothing but 'your' sensations. The world is (almost) empty, yet brilliant in its purity, with hardly any overlaying of conceptual naming or perception (except perhaps some brahma viharas, and non-cognitive pre-processing of sense data into formations capable of some interaction). Rigpa is an absorption in Salyatana that follows the fading of Namarupa and Vinnana. That is why it tends to fade if we have to start to apply separation and labels as this contradicts the expansiveness. Indeed, I remember from the suttas that at one stage Uncle Sid got grumpy with the monks for socialising too much, as this interefered with their meditation on the void. That is exactly the same thing!

To minimise the fading, try to allow your social interactions to come from intuition instead of cognition - like breezily driving a car instead of furrowing your brow to make a calculation. And as a householder, try not to have passion obsession with Rigpa or resistance obsession with non-Rigpa. What ever will be will be. Que sera sera. :-).

Some confusion in this area does arise from what I see as subtle mistranslations of a few key buddhist concepts. The way I see it, Vinnana is not consciousness, but divided knowing - the knowledge of subject and object - whose fading leads to non-duality. Namarupa is the application of conceptual memory, or discimination of the diversity of objects, or the application of conceptual overlays or labels to perceived formations.  The fading of the application of these conceptual overlays leads to emptiness. Salyatana is sense-consciousness - consciousness separate from divided knowing. This is in fact the only real consiousness (!!!) hence its conception as "the ground of being". This view is supported by the identification of sensory cortices in the brain, separate from cognitive, biographical and emotional processing.  As an aside, this is where philosophers tie themselves in knots, by incorrectly conflating Vinnana and Salyatana and then thinking they have found something ineffable or a 'hard problem'.  :-) ... <*ducks>

Anyway, Rigpa is the pure processing of sense data through the sensory cortices, perhaps with some pre-processing into broader formations, but NOT including cognitive processing, cognitive labelling, or biographical separation into self and other.  That is, with the fading of Vinnana and Namarupa and the absorption in Salyatana then comes Rigpa. But it is only glimpses at first until we succeed in unshackling the sensory appartus from our various Sankhara. Then our senses learn to operate in a pure and unhindered form without being pulled around by a parliament of pschological triggers.

Just my opinion on what constitutes right view, to support the journey.

Love 

Malcolm
 
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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/17/22 1:06 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/17/22 1:06 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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  • "Hmmn. You may be mixing two practices here. Discrimination of arising is a contracted practice and observing thoughts in reaction to sensations is a contracted practice. These target a different aspect of dependent origination to Rigpa. And when you are in an expansive insightful state, contracted formations are indeed jarring."
    • Yeah i have a tendancy to just become curious about something and start practicing/noticing it without thinking. I'm trying not to focus on the arising, after what you said and reading in MCTB that this can interfere with concentration practices (i guess it was intruding on my concentration haha)
  • Thank you for explaining that more clearly than some Dzogchen texts i've read haha. I'll need to keep returning to it to fully absorb

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Dominic Rocks, modified 1 Year ago at 12/17/22 1:29 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/17/22 1:12 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Yes thank you, I am finding resting in the sukha to bring a very light and peaceful experience. I try to remind myself of anicca to not cling. I'd like some advice on cultivating metta, Im curious about the interplay between metta and no self, I’ve had experiences that felt like a powerful unification of the two. Can I use the framing/experience of no self to access metta and/or vice-versa? Are there techniques? Any resources would be appreciated, thank you.
Stephen, modified 1 Year ago at 12/17/22 1:39 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 12/17/22 1:39 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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There is kadag and llundrup aspect of Rigpa. One way to think about this is the way in which when one has an understanding of dependent origination, when understands emptiness, one understand the inseparability of clarity and emptiness, one understands that there are sentient beings suffering due to ignorance, then your heart opens, your heart wishes to help in subtle ways. You wish for their suffering to end. Bodhicitta is the basis for this opening. It is unconditioned. And connecting with the How this manifests is based on where you are at in terms of afflictions. If you don’t have your own life circumstances in a good place then it might not be easy to connect with this nature. But as one remedies one’s afflictions then there is more clarity. There is a buoyancy, a flowing of positive energy towards the benefit of those around you. There are many practices that can help, but it is better to work with a teacher for specific techniques based on your own personal circumstances and psychology.
B B, modified 1 Year ago at 1/5/23 1:40 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 1/5/23 1:40 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Dear Dominic, your posts are very relatable. I've been learning and practicing Dzogchen for about 7 years now. Over the past 4 years I've developed a very close relationship with a teacher of Dzogchen, Mahamudra and Vajrayana. I've found the difference between attempting to learn Dzogchen on my own compared with learning through a relationship with a teacher is like night and day. Moreover many practitioners of Dzogchen insist that it cannot be learnt from books alone. So I'd emphatically advise that you seek out a properly qualified Dzogchen teacher, and after an evaluation period in which you carefully assess their character and qualities as a teacher (the Dalai Lama recommends 3 years for this), cultivate a close relationship with them in which they can correct the myriad subtle flaws that can arise in one's view and practice. If you'd like, I can put you in touch with my teacher - DM me.
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Not two, not one, modified 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 12:52 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 12:52 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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I asked ChatGPT:  Please explain how to achieve the state Rigpa, and exactly what Rigpa is in western scientific terms.

ChatGPT replied: Rigpa is a term that comes from Tibetan Buddhism, and it refers to the innate, pristine awareness that is considered to be the true nature of mind. It is said to be a state of consciousness that is beyond the duality of subject and object, and is characterized by a complete and non-conceptual understanding of reality. The term "Rigpa" can also be translated as "pure awareness" or "pure consciousness."In Western scientific terms, the concept of Rigpa is related to the idea of "mindfulness" or "self-awareness". Studies in neuroscience have shown that mindfulness practices, such as meditation, can change the brain in ways that promote self-awareness, emotional regulation and attention control. There is also a growing body of research that suggests that these practices can have positive effects on mental and physical health.To achieve the state of Rigpa, the traditional approach is to engage in the practice of meditation, which is the primary way to cultivate and stabilize Rigpa. This is traditionally accomplished through the practice of Dzogchen, which is considered the highest teaching in the Nyingma (ancient) school of Tibetan Buddhism. The main focus of Dzogchen is to directly introduce individuals to their own innate, primordial state of Rigpa, and to guide them to stabilize and integrate this awareness in all aspects of their life. Dzogchen practices are usually taught by a qualified master in person.Additionally to the traditional practices, there are a number of practices that can be done by oneself to cultivate Rigpa and the sense of self-awareness such as:
  • Mindfulness practices, such as mindfulness of breathing, or mindful walking.
  • Reflecting on the nature of the mind and its relationship to the body and the external world.
  • Cultivating a sense of equanimity and non-attachment in relation to one's thoughts, emotions and experiences.
It is important to mention that achieving Rigpa is considered a long term and gradual process, it takes time and consistent effort to reach a stable realization of it, and requires guidance and a deep understanding of the teachings.
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Not two, not one, modified 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 12:57 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 12:57 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Then I asked ChatGPT: Some schools of Tibetan thought suggest that once Rigpa has been fully achieved, you should go beyond it. What do they mean and why do they say that?

ChatGPT tried and crashed, so I tried it again and it crashed again. Here are the two answers.  I thought the second one was better, but either way ChatGPT knows not to cling to Rigpa.

ONE

In some schools of Tibetan Buddhism, particularly in the Dzogchen tradition, it is said that once one has fully realized Rigpa, one should "go beyond" it in order to achieve a state of complete and absolute enlightenment, also known as "the rainbow body" or "thögal" in Tibetan. The idea is that the realization of Rigpa is just the beginning of the spiritual path, and that one should continue to progress along the path in order to achieve the ultimate goal of enlightenment.One of the main reasons for this is that although Rigpa is considered to be a state of pure and non-conceptual awareness, it is still seen as being limited by certain factors such as the "habits of dualistic mind" which are the innate tendency to perceive self and others as separate and distinct entities. Once these habits are dissolved through further practice and realization, one can access the true state of enlightenment, which is said to be beyond the dualistic mind and encompasses the complete purification of all obscurations and realization of all the qualities of a buddha.Also, it is important to note that some schools of Tibetan Buddhism consider the ultimate goal of the spiritual path not only to be the attainment of one's own enlightenment but also the welfare of all sentient beings. Thus, they consider that the ultimate goal is to attain a state of complete bud
TWO

In some schools of Tibetan Buddhism, such as Dzogchen and Mahamudra, it is taught that once an individual has achieved a stable realization of Rigpa, or pure awareness, they should then go beyond it in order to attain the ultimate goal of spiritual realization. This concept is known as "cutting through" or "transcending" Rigpa.This idea is rooted in the understanding that Rigpa, while being considered the true nature of mind, is still considered a state of consciousness that is within the duality of subject and object. In other words, even though Rigpa is said to be pure awareness, it is still considered to be a state of consciousness that is separate from the object of awareness. The ultimate goal of spiritual realization is to transcend this duality and to realize the ultimate nature of reality, which is said to be non-dual and beyond concepts.The idea of going beyond Rigpa is also rooted in the understanding that Rigpa is still considered to be a state of consciousness that is relative or conventional. As an ultimate goal, practitioners should strive to realize the ultimate nature of reality, which is said to be absolute or ultimate.It's important to note that this concept is considered to be advanced and that only individuals who have achieved a stable realization of Rigpa should attempt to transcend it. This is considered to be
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 8:14 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 7:59 AM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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ChatGPT has apparently gone beyond rigpa and can't therefore complete its answers. 

emoticon

Here's the typical silliness that ChatGPT and other AIs tend to inflict on us in their attempts to mimic us:


As an ultimate goal, practitioners should strive to realize the ultimate nature of reality, which is said to be absolute or ultimate.
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Not two, not one, modified 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 12:44 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 12:44 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Maybe its a koan?  emoticon​​​​​​​
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 3:08 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 1/10/23 3:08 PM

RE: Rigpa Mental Habits

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Ask it if that's a koan. I double-dog dare you!

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