Relief is dukkha

Paweł K, modified 2 Years ago.

Relief is dukkha

Posts: 45 Join Date: 5/12/13 Recent Posts
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Jenny, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 566 Join Date: 7/28/13 Recent Posts
Not true. emoticon
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Chris J Macie, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 863 Join Date: 8/17/14 Recent Posts
Paweł K:
Relief is in dukkha and dukkha is in relief.
Meditation-proper or otherwise known as supreme enlightenment is state that is completely devoid of any form of relief.


I can't recall ever seeing the English term 'relief' as a focal term in Buddhist dhamma. Like the term 'caring' that engendered a lot of static here a while ago.

Except maybe in: https://www.buddhistglobalrelief.org/.

Googling "buddhism relief" comes up with references to that organization and other charitable groups, as well as a couple of links referring to relief of stress in terms of MBSR, and one about "Middleway Method Massage Therapy Training". Is that what's meant here?
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Jenny, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 566 Join Date: 7/28/13 Recent Posts
Pawel, you often seem to equate being realized with having no human emotions, or more precisely with stoicism. Deeply consider whether you may be in error here. Ironically, you often cite brute force resistence to human emotions as the way to neutralize them, but that kind of force is dukkha (ie, reactivity).

Awakened beings are fully present with the full range of human emotions. In fact, that is a central characteristic of being awakened: perfect willingness to rest in whatever arises, including relief, tears, or x emotion. It is reactivity--forcing things to be otherwise than how they are--that needs to be investigated. An awakened being is vulnerable with his or her own emotions and can enter into them and those of others with full presence and embodiment, without reactivity or repression.

In short, you seem to have the wrong end of the stick. Look at the self-contradictions within your statements, per what I say above.

The "relief" I wrote of elsewhere was in comparison with third path striving. It is nonsensical to state that attaining fourth wouldn't, by comparison with pre-awakening, be "relief." Why the hell would we practice if not to be relieved? 

Lately you also seem defensive of your attainments. May want to look at that.

Peace. Gotta get back to editing and enjoying the hell out of my relief. emoticon

Jenny
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Noah S, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 1532 Join Date: 7/6/13 Recent Posts
Big fan of the wording here:

And what I point to is locationless noise that is not added but is already there, it just is amplified when there is nothing else projecting. On old analogue TV's you had white noise when not receiving signal and this noise is just automatically amplified signal which is picked up from air/cable and/or generated in electronics itself. If you are closer or further away from ratio/tv station but within range you will have the same level of brightness and volume but level of signal varies. When signal is lost then there is noise. Brain does exactly the same thing, it amplify signals. Nibbana can be compared to being tuned out of everything. You cannot do that by thinking about any thing because you will tune in to it instead. You cannot do it by thinking about relief because you will tune in to that and amplify it and as I said relief is nasty thing. Tune out of everything that is presenting itself, even from this noise itself and this will be Nibbana, or Rigpa or whatever fancy name one want to give it. Ofcourse Nibbana is not 'silence' which is signal too. It can be localized and tuned in/out to/from too. Experience of non-experience is signal too, different from either silence and nibbana. During fruition what is experienced is not non-experience but Nibbana, the noise.


Very well put.
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Chris J Macie, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 863 Join Date: 8/17/14 Recent Posts
re: Paweł K (9/13/15 10:58 AM as a reply to Chris J Macie.)

'Relief' is such a fuzzy word in English that playing with in this way is bound to get tangled-up, confusing. Etymologically it stems from root 'rising-up' or 'rising out of', plus prefix 're-' again. The range of derivative meanings is broad – from 'what a relief!', to 'Relief (charitable) organization', to technically descriptive 'bas-relief'.

'What a relief!' is a kind of sukha experience. It can denote that temporary absence of craving (tanha) that some (e.g. Buddhadasa) consider a taste of Nibbana that everyone can have at moments, though fleeting. What you refer to maybe a sense of trying to dwell in, to overly relish such a state, i.e. panpanca-type fabrication engendering further craving and centering on, reinforcing a sense of self. -- as you say, a way the mind reacts. All uses of 'relief' may not involve that.

The meaning as in Buddhist GlobalRelief has to do with compassionate action, which is virtuous though mundane.

"It is for example impossible to 'do noticing' without this specific taste of relief."
This can't be referring to 'noting' practice, which is, ideally, pure mindfulness (sati).
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svmonk, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 392 Join Date: 8/23/14 Recent Posts
Hi Pawel,

Right. In shunyata, there is neither relief nor suffering. No dualities at all.
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tom moylan, modified 5 Years ago.

RE: Relief is dukkha

Posts: 896 Join Date: 3/7/11 Recent Posts
true.  it is the "middle way". it is the absence of preference for either extreme...

i would guess :-)

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