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Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/6/09 4:33 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Mike L 3/6/09 4:59 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Jackson Wilshire 3/6/09 5:08 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/6/09 5:14 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Florian 3/6/09 6:27 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/6/09 7:13 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/6/09 7:50 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/6/09 7:59 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Florian 3/6/09 11:49 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/6/09 11:50 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Gary Gach 8/14/13 9:12 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/7/09 12:08 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/7/09 12:20 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Hokai Sobol 3/7/09 2:19 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Hokai Sobol 3/7/09 2:30 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/7/09 2:40 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Hokai Sobol 3/7/09 3:00 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/7/09 3:05 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/7/09 3:10 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Hokai Sobol 3/7/09 3:10 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Chuck Kasmire 3/7/09 6:09 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/7/09 8:06 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Daniel M. Ingram 3/9/09 3:57 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/9/09 7:38 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/10/09 7:06 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) tarin greco 3/10/09 7:39 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Florian 3/10/09 8:08 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/10/09 8:31 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Hokai Sobol 3/10/09 8:33 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/10/09 8:43 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Gozen M L 3/10/09 9:20 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/10/09 9:31 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Kenneth Folk 3/10/09 2:21 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) John Finley 3/11/09 2:04 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/26/09 1:42 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/26/09 7:04 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Ben Turale 3/26/09 2:03 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/26/09 2:48 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/26/09 2:51 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) D C 3/26/09 3:22 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Kenneth Folk 3/26/09 3:30 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) C4 Chaos 3/26/09 3:34 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) D C 3/26/09 3:54 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Gozen M L 3/26/09 5:06 PM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/27/09 2:55 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/27/09 3:01 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/27/09 3:48 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Wet Paint 3/27/09 4:19 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Daniel M. Ingram 3/27/09 5:08 AM
RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today) Zach M 3/31/14 12:49 PM
Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 4:33 PM
Author: Tracy.
Forum: Dharma Overground Discussion Forum

Hi Folks,
I was just thinking about the great meditation teachers of yesteryear, like Chogyam Trungpa and Ajahn Chah, who helped lots of students attain serious levels of awakening. Gee, wouldn't it be nice to meet one of those guys, even though I don't want to go eat frogs in the forest or get all Tibetany..

Anyway, It seems like being a great teacher is a separate talent from being a highly realized contemplative. By "a great teacher" I mean particular people who, regardless of their technique or tradition, are able to guide students through insight territory so that they actually get it. I understand that this would be pretty much impossible to measure objectively, but I'm interested in hearing what names people might throw out there, and why. Rumors, hearsay, and so forth.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 4:59 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Names like Dan Ingram, Kenneth Folk, and Hokai spring to mind. :-)

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 5:08 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
I completely agree emoticon

Also, I know I'm not the only one here who would put Shinzen Young on the list. I've been really impressed with his ability to teach meditation practices in a clear and concise way.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 5:14 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: garyrh

I agree. At at this site you get to ask them questions too. This site and these teachers must be the best thing for thousands of years emoticon

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 6:27 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Dan, Kenneth and Hokai have been mentioned before,so I'll do it again.

As to rumors, hearsay, and so forth: Ven Ajahn Maha Boowa.

Cheers,
Florian

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 7:13 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: Tracy.

He's still alive???

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 7:50 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
DUH! last one of ajahn mun's students still alive, i believe, and he's at least 95 so you better make it snappy

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 7:59 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
oh and of course, u pandita of panditarama!

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 11:49 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Collectible Masters! emoticon

Sayadaw U Pandita, Junior (currently somewhere in Australia, I believe).

If we want to think in lineages, the (Theravada part of the) Dharma Overground is in his lineage, as he was the teacher who gave Daniel permission to teach.

Cheers,
Florian

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/6/09 11:50 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: GhostLLP

I'll list a few really good teachers that I'm aware of, though not all are Buddhist.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama,
Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche,
Chögyal Namkhai Norbu,
Venerable Rene Feusi,
T. K. V. Desikachar,
B. K. S. Iyengar,
Venerable Thubten Chodron,
Thich Nhat Hanh,
Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee,
Tau Malachi,
Robert Bruce

oh, and John Chang, but good luck finding him, haha.

Peace
Lucas

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 12:08 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
do all of these above meet the criteria tracy outlined? she defined 'great teacher' as being

'particular people who, regardless of their technique or tradition, are able to guide students through insight territory so that they actually get it.'

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 12:20 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: GhostLLP

Unless I'm misunderstanding the use of "insight territory," I would say yes.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 2:19 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
A "master" is a loaded term, spiritually and culturally. In the Western secular tradition, a master is simply someone knowledgeable or skillful in a specific domain with whom one enters a period of apprenticeship. Among contemporary spiritual "jet-setters", there are quite a few teachers that meet the criteria, and yet we should be cautious to qualify their mastery. There are those who have mastered the View, the preliminary/introductory terrain, the shamatha meditations, the ultimate insight realizations, the synthesis of meditation and psychology, the discipline and benefits of ethical living etc. but there are very few well-rounded great teachers, and even in those we will always find something that could use improvement, be it the details of their general discourse, their unbalanced expertize, their private lives and so one. The problem is that we often expect too much of everything from people burdened with titles like "master" or "guru" or even "grandmaster" or whatever. On the other hand, the informational and physical interconnectedness of today's world seems to require an increasing aliveness in the integrative aspect of our knowledge, so that any sort of over-specialization is increasingly and understandably being seen for what it most certainly is. It's thus much safer to quote from dead gurus, and then add interpretations as needed, but "dead gurus don't kick ass" meaning they can't really help with one's blind spots.

First, let's give a justification with each of proposed names, as reputation alone is unreliable. Ideally it would be based on firsthand acquaintance and relationship with these people. Second, let's qualify their mastery, either as one or several areas of specific expertize (i.e. vipassana technique, scholarship etc.), or as more global qualities (i.e. erudition plus realization, or lineage-holder etc.).

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 2:30 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
As to my name being mentioned in this thread, let's get serious. Pythagoras may have been humble when he said he wasn't a "sophos" (wise man), but just a philosopher (lover of wisdom). While I am no beginner, my discipleship has yet to produce an unquestionable degree of mastery in anything worth mentioning. I will let you know when that happens.:-)

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 2:40 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
hey, what is the View you keep talking about?

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 3:00 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
In traditional terms, prior to awakening the View is those tenets of Dharma that safeguard one's practice, i.e. the right view(s). After awakening, those modalities of interpretation that safeguard the integration of realization into every lived experience, AND that enable an effective and meaningful sharing of realization in the world. As such the View has a relative and an ultimate aspect, namely the two truths. Plus, the formulation of such View will shift with the level of structural development. So I would say the View has three important dimensions that need to be meaningfully integrated at every step.

Every great tradition and lineage has it's own preferred formulation of the View (including the ultimate component, even if only to say they refrain from over-formulating it due its nature). In Theravada/vipassana it could be summed-up perhaps as "Four truths, dependent co-arising, and three characteristics". Most of these orthodoxies (lit. right views) have been codified in a premodern structural context, so that now we're struggling with a massive overhaul in which neither doing away with everything traditional nor preserving the tradition intact is an option. This website is a symptom of such an overhaul, with an emphasis on practical application and pragmatism, but so far insufficient attention has been given to the View. Hence, I keep bringing it up.:-)

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/7/09 3:05 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
start a page!

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/7/09 3:10 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
would you explain, in brief, how robert bruce (i'm assuming you're talking about the guy who wrote 'astral dynamics' - excellent book by the way) has helped people navigate insight territory? aside from that book, i'm not entirely familiar with his work but was surprised to see his name listed there.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/7/09 3:10 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Promise to do that!

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/7/09 6:09 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Hi Tracy,
You bring up two points. I think it can be very inspiring and helpful to spend time around highly realized people. It shows us the potential of the practice and what it means to live a realized life. They can keep us pointed in the right direction.

The other issue is a teacher that can guide a student through insight territory. As Bob Dylan once said: “You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows” or, in DhO terms: “You don't need an Arahat to know which way the chi flows” (Thanks - I've been waiting for an opportunity to use this:-)

A very important potential of this site (that we can see happening now) is the ability of people to help each other when we come together and interact in an open and supportive way. A person who has recently moved through some part of this process may be of more help (at the nuts and bolts level) than someone who went through it 30 years ago. So I submit us (as a community) to the list (no jet lag, bring your own mosquitoes). Seriously, I believe this community has the potential to help “lots of students attain serious levels of awakening”.

Don't get me wrong – having great teachers around is very valuable – but nothing can help as much as our own mindfulness, persistence, and curiosity (investigation) when brought to the practice along with the support of a close community of fellow practitioners.

-Chuck

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/7/09 8:06 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: GhostLLP

If by "insight territory" one means insights into the nature of reality, Robert Bruce's teachings are invaluable. His particularly subjects of expertise, mainly that of astral projection, energy work,and healing can both be a powerful tool for those on the spiritual path to have realizations, and also as a catalyst to launch nonspiritual people onto a spiritual path (as in my case.) He is very effective at communicating his teachings and applying them towards spiritual development. The kind of insight that can come from properly understanding and experience the mind split alone is useful beyond words.

Though again, perhaps I am misunderstanding the term "insight territory" and it is maybe a very specific Theravada map based thing which I am unfamiliar. I don't know, I rarely understand some of the lingo around here and I apologize for this. If this is the case, then obviously Robert Bruce has little to offer in the area of Theravadan based meditation.

Peace
Lucas

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/9/09 3:57 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
A few teachers that get high marks that I know of:

Jack Kornfield and his senior crew at Spirit Rock get very good reviews from Vince these days.
Christopher Titmuss helped me a lot. I was on retreat with him when I got stream entry. He's political, somewhat scattered, occasionally dogmatic despite himself, and yet he really does have a strong clue and I think that sitting with him and his crew was a very good idea.
Norman Feldman: he was there on that retreat also and I always liked his style.
Subhana Barzaghi is a lineaged Zen Master and lineaged vipassana master, and probably the only women to hold both honors. I sat with her once long ago, but her open and down to earth style was part of the inspiration for sites like this one, and I am grateful for the brief contact I had with her.
Fred Von Allmen was also inspiring to me, an interesting mixture of Tibetan and Insight perspectives. He teaches in Europe.
I second Florian's recommendation of Sayadaw U Pandita, Junior, and would add that the whole direct Mahasi tradition has very high standards for teachers, and if you sit with one one of their abbots, you are likely sitting with the real deal.

One point about attributing awakening to a single teacher: the complexity of the life experiences and biological, cultural, psychological, energetic, and spiritual processes that go into a being awakening are so numerous and vast, usually over millions of seconds over years and years, and arise from such a vast array of factors, that it is hard even in very straightforward circumstances to attribute awakening to a teacher. That said, they clearly help tremendously, along with community, good theory and practice, as Chelek so aptly puts it. I have helped a few people get stream entry and some of them to get second and perhaps third path, and I may have even helped someone to realize arahatship along the way, but honestly the amount of my contribution seems very small.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/9/09 7:38 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
when i was a monk in thailand, my teacher was ajahn ratt rattanayano, and i was told by some people who had known and sat with him for years that, in his younger days, when he was a very enthusiastic and hardcore teacher pushing and grilling students constantly, dozens got the dharma eye (stream entry) quickly - one account i've heard stated 'more than a hundred'. great teacher, strange guy.. seems like most my teachers are that way!

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/10/09 7:06 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
i agree with Hokai that we should be careful about talking about "mastery" and attributing it to just anyone. whenever we make judgements on other people we always bring elements of our own shadows and projection. but still, separating the wheat from the chaff is an important skill that each of us have to possess in order to make skillful discerning.

that said, i define "master" as someone who's able to articulate the dharma in a very clear and concise way while embodying it at the same time. also, since i'm making a first person judgment, they have to have influenced me in a very deep way with regards to my worldview and spiritual practice.

in that respect, here's my short list.

Ken Wilber - uber-philosopher and practitioner. his work is unparalleled when it comes to articulating and integrating the dharma with other vast areas of knowledge. he had the most impact on me when it comes to philosophy and spirituality. however, he doesn't explicitly teach any method of awakening. he teaches by example (e.g. his own life). his preference is pointing out instructions. he is a vast portal of Buddhist (and non-buddhist) dharma.

Shinzen Young - if Wilber integrates the philosophy side of the dharma, then Shinzen integrates the "technology" of the dharma. his TSoE (The Science of Enlightenment) is, for me, the best explanation/description of the path of awakening done in a secular language. he is a master of language and scientific metaphors for the dharma. plus, he seems to be an all-around nice guy. my kind of kick ass dharma teacher emoticon

Daniel Ingram - for kicking my butt with MCTB and reminding me the importance of practice, and for kicking off Dharma Overground.

if and when i awaken in this lifetime, i feel that the expression that would come through this bodymind would be a healthy one. thanks to those people i've mentioned above.

~C

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/10/09 7:39 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
dang guys, she just wants to know which teachers have (or are said to have) guided a bunch of people to realisation! *that*, for the purpose of this thread, was the apparent definition of 'master' - master as in 'one who owns or controls' (teacher/student, master/slave), not master as in 'expert' (or 'highly realised contemplative' - as tracy explicitly stated!).

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/10/09 8:08 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Yes, Tarin, but Hokai didn't want his share of the slaves/students, so he raised the bar emoticon

Cheers,
Florian

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/10/09 8:31 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
exactly emoticon

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/10/09 8:33 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
@ Tarin - yes, agreed.

@ Florian - not sure I've raised the bar in any way. I do believe we need to qualify our statements and ground them in actual 1st hand or 2nd hand knowledge/acquaintance. It's extremely easy to project imagined qualities unto people in position of spiritual authority or assumed accomplishment. I've had my share of doing that.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/10/09 8:43 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
actually, she also said: "By "a great teacher" I mean particular people who, regardless of their technique or tradition, are able to guide students through insight territory so that they actually get it."

i'm very confident that the list i mentioned qualifies. and i'm not basing that on hearsay emoticon

~C

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/10/09 9:20 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Gozen

Hokai's quote:
"dead gurus don't kick ass" [meaning they can't really help with one's blind spots].
....is a quote from another great, albeit highly controversial and now deceased teacher, Adi Da Samraj [1939-2008].

I was one of Adi Da's student-devotees for a time in the 1970s and 1980s. I received shaktipat, induced experiences of the formless realms, etc. by virtue of his yogic power. I also benefited by living the "life disciplines" and by studying his written and otherwise recorded teaching.

Ken Wilber once endorsed Adi Da, then later sort of retracted that; it was a "sort of" retraction because Wilber did not deny Adi Da's Enlightenment, his siddhi , or the value of his teaching. But as anyone knows who has spent time in Adi Da's spiritual community, it was extremely demanding, chaotic and difficult in more ways than it should have been. I know people who are there still and it's pretty much the same. But none of this detracts from the value of Adi Da's teaching, which I still find to be extraordinarily comprehensive, precise and useful.

Gozen

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/10/09 9:31 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
yeah, i remember Wilber's detraction of Adi Da, but you're right, he didn't detract his wisdom and attainment, and rightly so. what i believe Wilber detracted was the "weird" behaviour of Adi Da, not his teachings and attainment.

in any case, thanks for pointing out "shaktipat". i believe that this is another topic for discussion which i'm really interested to flesh out (especially with the Arahats in here). for the longest time, i've been wondering why "enlightened" beings can't just *induce* the experience of awakening to other people (at least the initial mindblowing kensho). my conjecture is that this *skill* is a part of the so-called training in morality (or another line of the development). some awakened beings developed it and some don't.

~C

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/10/09 2:21 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Tracy, I think your definition of "great teacher" is excellent. I like pragmatism and meritocracy. With your definition in mind, I would like to second what Chelek wrote above. For people who want to make progress ("actually get it," using Tracy's terminology), DhO, as a community, might be as good as it gets.

I'm very excited about this online community and the remarkable progress that people are making here. This remarkable experiment in democratic dharma is, in my opinion, the coolest thing going on in dharma today. I feel lucky to be a part of it. The synergistic effect of all these dedicated practitioners, at every level of development, offering guidance and support to each other, is unprecedented and arguably more effective than any one-on-one guru/student relationship.

Chelek also pointed out that in the final analysis each of us must make our own way, by our own efforts. The teacher or community can offer guidance and support, but in the end it's just you and the cushion.

Kenneth

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/11/09 2:04 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
@Kenneth: "The synergistic effect of all these dedicated practitioners, at every level of development, offering guidance and support to each other, is unprecedented and arguably more effective than any one-on-one guru/student relationship."

I could not agree more! Having access to the weath of knowledge present in this group is incredibly valuable. I think it's also a more effective way of transmitting concepts and ideas than having only one guru. Sometimes one needs to hear ideas expressed in several different ways before real understanding develops.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/26/09 1:42 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: rossobrown

Sayadaw U Pandita, Jr. is indeed teaching in Australia. To be specific he has a Meditation Centre in Melbourne - 'Dhamma Sukha' . He also gives meditation and Dhamma talks at the Buddhist Society of Victoria, Melbourne. He has made frequent trips back to Malaysia and Burma to conduct retreats or help in the post-cyclone recovery.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/26/09 7:04 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: Crazywisdom

A woman I now goes to retreats with a Zen master in Japan that does something close to this. He touches everyones third eye and they imidiately see this incredible white light and then use that as the object to focus on. During the rest of the retreat he holds the whole energetic field of the retreats and somehow sort of controls the meditation so that people experience it as effortless. This girl does regular intense tantra retreats and said a retreat with this guy was like 5 tantra retreats in one. I will try to find his name. He lives in Okinawa.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/26/09 2:03 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Pandita Junior is in Melbourne, Australia, which is my home town emoticon
I've been going to his weekly sits for a while now. I sense that he posseses a very thorough knowledge of meditation, I know Dan regards him very highly. I empathize with what Hokai was saying too, because we tend to expect a master to be pretty rounded in all areas, when in truth they may have some deep shadow aspects of their personality whilst possessing supreme insight knowledge. I'm a Transpersonal Counsellor, I've found that what helps my clients best come to terms with what they are is to simply reflect back to them their own experience.

My favourite teachers (or teachings of theirs) are:
Genpo Roshi - Big Mind is amazing, it's the best afternoon I spent facilitating 'right view'
Gregory Kramer - Have any of you guys in the US met him? He's been teaching in the insight tradition for about 30 years and has developed a very amazing insight tool called 'insight dialogue' which is essentially about bringing meditation to interpersonal relations and conversation (which is where we make the majority of constructs).

Oh yeah, and some guy called Buddha.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/26/09 2:48 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
wow. interesting. i've heard stories about this too, mostly in the Hindu tradition. let us know so we can check this out emoticon

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/26/09 2:51 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
i've already mentioned Shinzen Young in this thread. serendipitously, Shinzen Young channel on Youtube has just been announced. so here's the link to some of Shinzen's dharma talks - http://www.youtube.com/user/expandcontract
watch them and judge for yourself whether he fits the "living buddhist master" title emoticon

~C

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/26/09 3:22 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
I would add Adyashanti to this list. He resonates strongly with me as true and to the point in the same way this board does. To my limited understanding, at any rate, he comes across as tremendously deep, sure, and deft. I'd love to see a dialogue between Adya, Kenneth, Hokai, and Daniel. (Or any one of them) I don't know whether it would be a meeting of minds but it certainly would be fascinating. Any interest?

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/26/09 3:30 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Many people have reported this very intense experience of being on the receiving end of shaktipat. But the universal underlying theme seems to be that the experience doesn't stick. If you want lasting insight, you must do some kind of contemplative practice.

American economist Milton Friedman has been quoted as saying "There's no such thing as a free lunch."

Right.

Take responsibility, people, and abandon your fantasies of passive enlightenment.

"Work out your own salvation. Do not depend on others." - Buddha

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
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3/26/09 3:34 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
serendipitously, i've been listening to Adyashanti's "The End of Your World" audios. good stuff. he sounds like he's the real deal. that said, i'm not sure if Adyashanti can be classified as "Buddhist" (even if his training was mostly Zen). he doesn't teach any specific buddhist practices (that i know of). he teaches via "satsangs" and his teaching is more like Vedanta (e.g. direct pointing out). that said, it would be cool to hear Adyashanti have a dialogue with fellow awakened beings rather than just hearing him speaking about enlightenment from a "soapbox" emoticon

~C

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/26/09 3:54 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Yes, Adyashanti having dropped his Zen practices for 'pointing out' instructions via satsang is one of the reasons why conversation would be so valuable. Not to decide one as better than the other but to explore the ground between vipassana practice and direct pointing out. Kenneth and Hokai, in particular both seem to go there to a degree. And from the other side it would be of value to see his response to a hard core, well modeled and staged insight practice. I can only imagine he'd be positive with some interesting reflections. And if he wasn't, all the more interesting emoticon

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/26/09 5:06 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Yes, yes, yes! I've been on the receiving end of shaktipat and I know how intense it can be if the "transmitter" is a really powerful yogi.

But when it's over and done and the afterglow has faded...ya got nothin'! You don't know how he did it to you and you don't know how to do it for yourself. The best that can be said about it is that shaktipat has shown you what's possible. Now the ball's in your court; learn to hit it down the line.

So that's the main point. But there are a few other things worth knowing about shaktipat. First, you have be prepared to receive it. If you are not open and receptive, either nothing will happen or you'll simply feel irritated, as if some energy is buzzing you annoyingly. Second, if you have received the energy, after the experience fades you'll feel a powerful desire to...find something to fill the void. Food, videos, sex, drugs--folks I know (and I myself) went "looking for an angry fix" (to quote Allen Ginsburg; my fix was food) after the "thrill is gone" (B. B. King). Third, tantric practices can (if not done very carefully) lead to the same get-it/lose-it/need-it cycle. Beware!

Finally, there is something a bit like shaktipat but without the drama. It's a sort of "induction" (akin to how an electric current can be induced in conductive wire by passing a magnet near it). This Induction takes place when a spiritual practitioner is in the physical presence of an advanced spiritual Adept (an Awakened being). An Awakened person will have this effect even without intending it, and can increase the effect (as well as produce other effects) by using certain techniques of attention and directed energy. This is more gentle and much more profound than shakipat. It is often called Satsang (by Adyashanti and others).

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/27/09 2:55 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: Crazywisdom

I have the same impression in general. I am not sure wether any of it sticks after the retreats.

The guys who teach KAP (kundalini awakening process) do shaktipat in e erealy inteligent way. They teach you a certain practice or meditation like the orbit or a breathing tecnhique, then they give you a shaktipat that realy gets you on your way with that particular practice. Although the energy does not stay permanently as recieved this makes the students realy get the practice thaught. As I understand the extreeme pace of teaching is dependent on these shaktipats otherwise people would need more time to get each pratice working.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/27/09 3:01 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: Crazywisdom

Kohrogi Sensei I think is the guy doing the shaktipat and Uezusan is an other teacher at the same place that does an equaly powerfull healing session instead of a shaktipat for meditation.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/27/09 3:48 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: msj123

I also found this to be true in my experience. Although in my case, it was a tai chi teacher, and it was unintentional.

I also agree with Kenneth that insight produces a different kind of enlightenment than energy practice.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/27/09 4:19 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Author: Crazywisdom

That`s interesting. Where does he say that?

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/27/09 5:08 AM as a reply to Wet Paint.
In general, parallel or divergent enlightenment track theories tend to cause in me some deep feeling that something is wrong somewhere, as one of the fundamental assumptions about all this is that what is discovered is something essential and unique about the fundamental nature of experience.

It is true that different tracks to that same thing produce different peripheral skill sets and appreciations of different aspects of the path to that same thing, as well as different shadow sides and side effects.

While I tend to balk at the parallel or perpendicular awakening track models, if there really is such an undercurrent of sentiment, perhaps we should have a thread to hash that out and hear different perspectives on the topic. I'll start one shortly.

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
zen insight meditation teachers thich nhat hanh
Answer
8/14/13 9:12 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
My #1 vote's for my teacher Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh. ( I'd be more than glad to start a thread for discussion & practice of his teachings. )

Of numerous marvelous teachers, five I also strongly endorse :




  • the Buddha within you

RE: Living Buddhist Masters (of Today)
Answer
3/31/14 12:49 PM as a reply to Wet Paint.
Any love for Pa Auk Sayadaw here?

I think he provides a great framework for practice. He teaches at an extremely high level the jhanas, the powers, and insight. Many of his students are now teaching in the US, one of whom I work with on occasion and is a great practitioner herself.

I think Pa Auk Sayadaw and his students epitomize the technical Burmese practitioner that Daniel refers to.

I would be curious to here what people think about insight on the Rupa Kalapas as Pa Auk Sayadaw teaches it, as opposed to a more dry insight.