RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Daniel M. Ingram 2/24/23 4:49 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Martin 2/24/23 6:25 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? shargrol 2/24/23 6:47 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 2/24/23 9:26 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Chris M 2/25/23 11:25 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Martin 2/26/23 4:40 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 2/24/23 9:24 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? svmonk 2/24/23 10:02 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Siavash ' 2/25/23 11:08 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 2/26/23 6:01 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Zack Whitford 2/27/23 9:08 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Smiling Stone 3/1/23 7:24 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Smiling Stone 3/1/23 7:21 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Chris M 3/1/23 7:37 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Hector L 3/1/23 9:23 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Chris M 3/1/23 10:16 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Hector L 3/1/23 9:33 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 11:25 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 1:47 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 11:29 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 11:31 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 11:35 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 11:38 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Gus Castellanos 3/15/23 5:27 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Chris M 3/15/23 11:38 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Pepe · 3/15/23 11:48 AM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Chris M 3/15/23 12:28 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Smiling Stone 3/15/23 12:19 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Chris M 3/15/23 12:29 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? Martin 3/15/23 12:31 PM
RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO? เอียน พิชฟอร์ด 3/16/23 9:53 AM
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Daniel M Ingram, modified 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 4:49 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 4:42 PM

chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 3275 Join Date: 4/20/09 Recent Posts
I asked chatGPT: What is the best advice on the Dharma Overground website?

Here's what it wrote:

The Dharma Overground is an online community focused on the discussion of meditation, contemplative practice, and related topics. As a language model, I cannot provide opinions or subjective judgments on the content of the website, but I can give you some information about the types of advice you may find there.

The Dharma Overground website contains a wealth of information about various meditation practices, insights, and experiences. The site features a forum where practitioners can discuss their experiences and seek advice from more experienced meditators. Some of the most common topics of discussion on the site include mindfulness, concentration, insight, and various stages of meditation.

One of the main pieces of advice you may find on the Dharma Overground is to develop a consistent meditation practice. This means committing to a regular daily practice, even if it's just a few minutes a day, and gradually increasing the amount of time you spend in meditation. You may also find advice on how to develop mindfulness, concentration, and insight, as well as techniques for working with difficult emotions and thoughts that may arise during meditation.

Another common piece of advice on the Dharma Overground is to seek guidance from experienced teachers and mentors. Many of the members on the site have years of experience practicing meditation and can offer valuable insights and guidance based on their own experiences. They may also recommend books, courses, or other resources to help deepen your practice.

​​​​​​​Overall, the best advice on the Dharma Overground website will depend on your individual needs and goals. It's important to approach the site with an open mind and a willingness to learn and grow in your meditation practice.
Martin, modified 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 6:25 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 6:25 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 914 Join Date: 4/25/20 Recent Posts
Much more concise than I could have managed. My compliments to our robot overlords!
shargrol, modified 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 6:47 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 6:47 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 2568 Join Date: 2/8/16 Recent Posts
My goodness! :o
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 9:26 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 9:14 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
What a great tool would be if an AI could summarize months or years of practice logs, in order to speed up the work of teachers and mentors...

As Chris journals are the most complete practice logs, as they span from SE to 4th Path... I asked chatGPT to: "summarize the major events, stages and insights described in Chris' (meditation) Journal Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6". Funny enough, its first response was a vanilla description of what a *standard* yogi would go through. The second attempt instead speaks tries an almost POI (vanilla too) map in Pragmatic Dharma terms. The third attempt (not included here) instead says that Chris found inspiration in the teachings of various spiritual leaders, including Eckhart Tolle and Ram Dass.

chatGPT # 1:

Chris' meditation journal parts 1-6 document his experiences, stages, and insights throughout his meditation practice. Here is a summary of the major events, stages, and insights described in each partemoticonart 1:
  • Chris describes starting his meditation practice with the goal of reducing stress and anxiety.
  • He experiences restlessness, boredom, and frustration during his early meditation sessions.
  • Chris begins to notice subtle physical sensations and develops a regular practice routine.
Part 2:
  • Chris experiences intense physical sensations during his meditation, including tingling and pulsing.
  • He begins to notice the impermanence of his thoughts and emotions.
  • Chris experiences an increase in focus and concentration.
Part 3:
  • Chris experiences feelings of joy and bliss during meditation.
  • He begins to experience deeper levels of concentration and mindfulness.
  • Chris starts to observe his thoughts and emotions with more clarity.
Part 4:
  • Chris experiences periods of confusion and doubt in his practice.
  • He notices patterns in his thoughts and behaviors and begins to see them with more clarity.
  • Chris starts to experience a sense of spaciousness in his mind during meditation.
Part 5:
  • Chris experiences a shift in his practice as he begins to focus on the breath as a primary object.
  • He experiences a sense of equanimity and balance.
  • Chris describes his experience of the Jhana states, including joy, tranquility, and equanimity.
Part 6:
  • Chris experiences a breakthrough in his practice, where he reaches a deep state of concentration and experiences a sense of unity and interconnectedness.
  • He experiences a sense of calm and stillness in his mind.
  • Chris reflects on the impermanence and emptiness of all phenomena.

chatGPT #2: 

Overall, Chris' journal documents his progress through various stages of meditation practice, including developing concentration, mindfulness, and insight. He experiences various physical and mental sensations and gains insight into the nature of his thoughts and emotions. Chris' practice also leads him to experience deeper states of calm, bliss, and interconnectedness.

Chris' meditation journal is a personal account of his journey through various stages of meditation practice. Here is a summary of the major events, stages, and insights described in each of the six parts.

Part 1: Chris describes his early experiences with meditation and how he struggled to stay focused. He talks about the importance of setting intentions and being patient with oneself.

Part 2: Chris describes his experience of the "Dark Night of the Soul," a difficult stage in meditation practice where one may experience intense emotions and feelings of despair. He talks about how this stage eventually passed and led to a deeper sense of peace.

Part 3: Chris describes his experience with the "Arising and Passing Away" stage, where he experienced intense moments of joy and bliss followed by moments of confusion and disorientation. He talks about how he learned to navigate these ups and downs and maintain equanimity.

Part 4: Chris describes his experience with the "Insight" stage, where he began to see the impermanence and interconnectedness of all things. He talks about how this stage led to a deeper sense of compassion and understanding for himself and others.

Part 5: Chris describes his experience with the "Equanimity" stage, where he learned to accept whatever arose in his meditation practice without judgment or resistance. He talks about how this stage led to a deeper sense of inner peace and stability.

Part 6: Chris describes his ongoing meditation practice and how he continues to deepen his understanding of the nature of reality. He talks about the importance of maintaining a sense of curiosity and openness and being willing to explore new experiences in meditation.

**--**

As this wasn't working, I asked: "Do you know how to summarize a text if I give you a weblink?"

chatGPT:

Yes, I can certainly help you summarize a text if you provide me with a weblink. There are several techniques that can be used to summarize a text, including extractive summarization and abstractive summarization. Extractive summarization involves selecting important sentences or phrases from the original text and combining them to create a summary, while abstractive summarization involves generating new sentences that capture the key information in the original text.One approach that I can take to summarize a text from a weblink is to use an AI-powered text summarization tool, such as GPT-3, BERT, or TextRank. These tools are designed to analyze the content of a text and extract the most important information, generating a summary that captures the essence of the original text.To summarize a text using a weblink, you can provide me with the link and specify what kind of summary you want (e.g. a brief overview, a summary of key points, etc.). I can then use a text summarization tool to generate a summary for you.

*** So I tried for the last time: "Please do a summary of key points from these weblinks" (I included the weblinks)

chatGPT kept providing a vanilla description of a *standard* yogi:

he links provided are a series of articles written by Chris, a practitioner of meditation, documenting his experiences with the practice. Here are some key points from each article:Article 1:
  • Chris talks about his motivation for starting meditation practice, which is to find a way to deal with his anxiety and depression.
  • He discusses his initial struggles with meditation, including difficulty with sitting still and quieting his mind.
  • Chris mentions that he started to experience some benefits from his practice, including feeling more relaxed and at ease.
Article 2:
  • Chris discusses his experiences with different meditation techniques, including breath awareness and body scanning.
  • He talks about the challenge of staying focused during meditation, especially when his mind wanders.
  • Chris also reflects on the insights he has gained through his practice, including a deeper understanding of impermanence and the nature of thoughts and emotions.
Article 3:
  • Chris discusses how his meditation practice has started to impact his daily life, including improving his relationships and his ability to handle stress.
  • He talks about the importance of finding a balance between effort and relaxation in his practice.
  • Chris also reflects on the role of community in supporting his practice and helping him stay motivated.
Article 4:
  • Chris talks about a period of difficulty in his meditation practice, where he felt stuck and wasn't making progress.
  • He discusses the importance of accepting this state and not forcing progress, allowing his practice to unfold naturally.
  • Chris also reflects on the role of patience and perseverance in his practice.
Article 5:
  • Chris talks about a breakthrough he had in his practice, where he experienced a deep sense of calm and clarity.
  • He reflects on the role of surrender in this experience, letting go of expectations and allowing the practice to unfold on its own.
  • Chris also discusses the importance of integrating these experiences into daily life, rather than just seeking them out during meditation.
Article 6:
  • Chris reflects on the benefits of consistency in his practice, including increased stability and deeper insights.
  • He also discusses the importance of staying open to new experiences and not getting attached to particular states or techniques.
  • Chris ends the series by expressing gratitude for his practice and the insights he has gained through it.

****
So, this isn't working. Maybe I was not specific enough, or give it too much text to process, or didn't know how to ask correctly. Maybe other DhOers know how to make it work. Fun try anyway! (I guess Chris don't mind I used his journals, otherwise please let me know and I'll erase my post)
​​​​​​​
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 9:24 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 9:21 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Q: Why is it that when I ask chatGPT to do a summary of key points from some specific weblinks, it actually doesn't summarize the texts provided in those weblinks but instead provide a vanilla summary of other texts?

A: As an AI language model, I try my best to provide accurate and relevant summaries based on the input that I receive. However, it's possible that I may not fully understand the context of the weblinks or the specific information you're looking for.

When you provide me with a weblink, I typically extract the main content from the page and generate a summary based on that information. However, some web pages may have multiple sections or subtopics, and my algorithm may not always identify the most relevant content for your specific query.

Additionally, if the weblink you provide contains a lot of extraneous or irrelevant information, my summary may not accurately reflect the key points you're looking for. In these cases, it may be helpful to provide more specific instructions or guidelines to help me generate a more accurate summary.

Overall, I strive to provide the best possible summary based on the input that I receive, but there may be limitations to my ability to understand and interpret web content.

**
So probably, I should copypaste the whole text in a single file (erasing posts of fellow practitioners commenting in the threads)
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svmonk, modified 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 10:02 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/24/23 10:02 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 403 Join Date: 8/23/14 Recent Posts
YMMV. I am using ChatGPT to help write a technical book and it sometimes answers questions of fact flat out incorrectly. If you rephrase the question and ask another way it gives you different incorrect answer. I just asked it if it could generate a book index and it first said it could but when I asked how to upload the book files, it said it wasn't possible.

It's pretty good at high level summaries. You can then ask it to drill down on specific points. But you need to check most of what it says with Google when it comes to details. It's useful enough that I signed up for a Pro subscription.

Overall, I'd give it a C+.
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 2/25/23 11:25 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/25/23 8:55 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 5333 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
Pepe, I'm fine with using my practice log to experiment with LLMs. It presents a good example of how formulaic (deterministic) large language models are. Most of what the AI created for you is out of order and inaccurate, so I'm posting a more obvious series of links to the real thing, parts 1 thru 7, over on AwakeNetwork so that folks can judge for themselves:

Chris' Practice Journal - Part 1
Chris' Practice Journal - Part 2
Chris' Practice Journal - Part 3
Chris' Practice Journal - Part 4
Chris' Practice Journal - Part 5
Chris' Practice Journal - Part 6
Chris' Practice Journal - Part 7

I've been researching transformers and large language models recently, and it's clear that most people don't know how they work. Here's a good article on what's going on under the hood of a large language model using transformers to predict text responses statistically:

What is ChatGPT Doing.. and Why Does It Work?

If you read this article thoroughly, you'll see there is no meaning or subject matter knowledge going on. It's all neural nets and probability-based processing. Math. All the alpha characters (words) we see as the results of our questions are reduced to numeric values, and a series of probabilistic calculations are created and used to predict the most likely next word in a sentence that is 1) relevant to the value of the question and 2) based on the training data fed into the LLM. 
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Siavash ', modified 1 Year ago at 2/25/23 11:08 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/25/23 11:07 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 1697 Join Date: 5/5/19 Recent Posts
 I don't know if the pro version has any big differences or not, or if they have a much advanced version of this AI which is not public, but with this version of ChatGPT, I think it's mostly good for high level summaries, amusement, and getting high level info on getting started on the subjects that one doesn't have much knowledge.
I spent 2-3 full  days, asking it to generate some code samples, for the questions that I gave it, and I formulated the questions carefully, to be clear what I wanted, but it failed almost all the time. When I ask it to do a simple task, often it performs well, but then when I ask it to do another task based on the result of the first task, it becomes unreliable. If I go multiple levels, then it doesn't work properly or generates unrelated results, with a fixed apology sentence!
And the biggest problem that I encountered with it, is the incomplete responses.
 
Martin, modified 1 Year ago at 2/26/23 4:40 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/26/23 4:40 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 914 Join Date: 4/25/20 Recent Posts
Super interesting article! Thanks, Chris. 

In fact, Daniel's original question, with its pretty successful result, followed by Pepe's trials, with their terrible results, and then the article explaining why, together, make for a good lesson explaining a lot. 
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 2/26/23 6:01 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/26/23 6:01 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Thanks Chris, it's impressive how Stephen Wolfram manages to pull off a guide tour to this large language models. It made me remember the game "one word story", which I play with my kid and wife, where each one has to add one word at a time and build up a funny yet somehow coherent long sentence. In some ways, chatGPT does something similar with those "attention heads/blocks". 

Bellow, Stephen Wolfram final overview: 

Ultimately, ChatGPT is “merely” pulling out some “coherent thread of text” from the “statistics of conventional wisdom” that it’s accumulated. But it’s amazing how human-like the results are. And as I’ve discussed, this suggests something that’s at least scientifically very important: that human language (and the patterns of thinking behind it) are somehow simpler and more “law like” in their structure than we thought. ChatGPT has implicitly discovered it. But we can potentially explicitly expose it, with semantic grammar, computational language, etc.

What ChatGPT does in generating text is very impressive—and the results are usually very much like what we humans would produce. So does this mean ChatGPT is working like a brain? Its underlying artificial-neural-net structure was ultimately modeled on an idealization of the brain. And it seems quite likely that when we humans generate language many aspects of what’s going on are quite similar.

When it comes to training (AKA learning) the different “hardware” of the brain and of current computers (as well as, perhaps, some undeveloped algorithmic ideas) forces ChatGPT to use a strategy that’s probably rather different (and in some ways much less efficient) than the brain. And there’s something else as well: unlike even in typical algorithmic computation, ChatGPT doesn’t internally “have loops” or “recompute on data”. And that inevitably limits its computational capability—even with respect to current computers, but definitely with respect to the brain.

It’s not clear how to “fix that” and still maintain the ability to train the system with reasonable efficiency. But to do so will presumably allow a future ChatGPT to do even more “brain-like things”. Of course, there are plenty of things that brains don’t do so well—particularly involving what amount to irreducible computations. And for these both brains and things like ChatGPT have to seek “outside tools”—like Wolfram Language.

But for now it’s exciting to see what ChatGPT has already been able to do. At some level it’s a great example of the fundamental scientific fact that large numbers of simple computational elements can do remarkable and unexpected things. But it also provides perhaps the best impetus we’ve had in 2,000 years [ since Aristotelian Logic was developed in Ancient Greece ] to understand better just what the fundamental character and principles might be of that central feature of the human condition that is human language and the processes of thinking behind it.

---&---

For the sake of completeness, I asked chatGPT to summarize Chris' first post in his practice log, and then Kenneth's answer:

Chris' post: The author describes a recurring experience during meditation where focusing on their breath results in a building of energy and fine vibrations in the top of their head, which intensifies with each breath until reaching a crescendo. At this point, the energy quickly flows to the observed object, merges with it, and an image appears for a tiny fraction of a second. This is followed by pure pitch black, silent nothingness for about a second before awareness reappears. The author is unsure if this experience has any significance.

Kenneth' answer: The text congratulates the reader for describing phala (fruition) accurately in Theravada Buddhism, which is a significant marker of progress in the Theravada system. This suggests that the reader is at least a sotapanna (stream-winner), which means they will be reborn a maximum of seven more times before entering nibbana for the final time and will never again be reborn in the "lower" realms. 
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Zack Whitford, modified 1 Year ago at 2/27/23 9:08 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 2/27/23 9:01 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 6 Join Date: 8/20/22 Recent Posts
I broke Meta's chat-bot AI after teaching it about Koans and trying to collaborate with it to write one. It was pretty wild what occurred. That was maybe 3 or 4 months ago?

The exponential advancements with the chat-bot tech are absolutely stunning. 
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Smiling Stone, modified 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 7:24 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 5:28 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 343 Join Date: 5/10/16 Recent Posts
Hey everybody,
I was quite reluctant to try that AI chatbox, but two of my very good friends were so enthusiastic about it that I gave it a go...
I did not think I would make these tests public, but I will share them here as I was quite impressed with some of its answers.
I read the article linked by Chris (best info I got on the subject, thanks Chris), so I understand how it goes word after word to produce plausible content... But the subjective impression it gives is that it has a comprehensive understanding of the subject at hand and a capacity to address the implicit in the question, sometimes talking it further than expected...

Well, here is the wall of text showcasing some of the most relevant answers:
1) Me: In your opinion, what would be the quickest, most efficient way for me to generate a mystical experience?

Chatgpt: As an AI, I don't have personal opinions or experiences, but I can tell you that the quickest and most efficient way for an individual to generate a mystical experience is a matter of personal preference and can vary greatly from person to person. Some common practices that people use to generate mystical experiences include:

Meditation and mindfulness practices
Prayer and spiritual practices
Yoga and other forms of physical exercise
Psychedelic drugs
Nature immersion
It's important to note that these practices are not guaranteed to generate mystical experiences, and that some people may not have mystical experiences through these practices. Also, It's important to remember that mystical experiences can be intense and overwhelming, it's important to approach them with caution and guidance, If you're using any substance or practice that can alter your consciousness, it's important to educate yourself and be in a safe and controlled environment.

Additionally, It's important to note that mystical experiences are not limited to any particular religion or belief system and that each person's experience can be unique and personal, therefore, it's important to find what works best for you, and you may need to try different practices, approach them with an open mind, and be patient.
2) Me: Could you give a summary of the text linked (a long excerpt from a goenka talk on asavas I hesitated to put in the Goenka thread as it's long and repetitive -I guess I will, though-)

Chatgpt: The text is discussing the connection between the mind and matter, specifically how mental states, known as sankharas, can change into physical bio-chemicals, known as asavas. The text states that when an individual generates a sankhara, such as anger, a bio-chemical is produced and starts flowing in the blood stream. This bio-chemical can make a person feel happy or miserable and can lead to a vicious cycle of generating the same negative mental state. The text also states that asavas can lead to addiction and habit patterns. The text suggests that the way to stop this cycle is to observe the sensation caused by the asava without reacting to it, breaking the habit pattern and reducing the flow of the bio-chemical.

[I also asked him to edit the text to make it shorter without loosing the essence and the style, but it gave me more summaries before going berserk... It was the only time it lost it completely, referring to a medical resume which had nothing to do with the subject... Here is one alternate version:

[Alternate: In Buddhism, the concept of "asava" refers to the flow of bio-chemicals that originate from the mind and create physical sensations. These chemicals are produced when a mental defilement, such as anger, fear, or passion, is generated and surfaces. This creates a vicious circle, where the physical sensations produced by the bio-chemicals further fuel the mental defilements. To break this cycle, Buddhists are taught to observe the sensations without reacting to them. This will reduce the flow of the bio-chemicals and weaken the sensations until they pass away. Over time, this process will change the chemistry of the body and stop the production of new asavas, leading to a state of liberation.

Me: actually, I'd like you to keep the original text, and just trim what is not necessary, still maintaining the flow of the text

As a physician, I find it important to keep up with current medical research to better care for my patients. I recently read a study on the effects of alcohol consumption on cardiovascular health. The study found that even moderate alcohol consumption can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This is concerning, as many people believe that drinking a glass of wine with dinner is beneficial for heart health. The study indicates that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption when it comes to cardiovascular disease. It is important for healthcare providers to educate their patients on the dangers of alcohol and to advise them to limit or avoid alcohol altogether.
​​​​​​​[Here I cut the second bullshit answer]

Me: This text [joining the text]
Chatgpt: This text is discussing the concept of "asava" in Buddhism. "Asava" is described as a flow of some fluid or a secretion of some fluid that is produced in response to a mental input such as anger or fear. This fluid is said to change the mind into matter and creates a vicious cycle that leads to further mental defilements. The text explains that the way to break this cycle is to observe the sensation that arises from this fluid without reacting to it, which weakens and ultimately stops the flow of the fluid. This leads to a change in the chemical composition of the body and a person reaches the stage of an arahant, a fully liberated person, who has overcome all mental defilements.

Me: sorry, but you did not complete the task I gave you, which was to keep the original text, cutting the redundant content (copying again the full text)
Chatgpt: When the sankharas (negative mental states) arise, the mind changes into matter by creating a flow of bio-chemicals in the body. These chemicals, also called "asavas," result from mental inputs such as anger, fear, or passion and create sensations in the body. Over time, these sensations can become habits that the mind becomes addicted to, leading to a vicious cycle of creating the same negative mental states.
To break this cycle, the Buddha taught to observe sensations without reacting to them. This observation helps to reduce the flow of harmful bio-chemicals and weaken the old stock of negative sankharas. With continued practice, this process leads to a change in the body's chemistry, eventually stopping the generation of new asavas and leading to a happier, more peaceful state of being.

thanks anyway]


Me: is this a wildly shared view?

Chatgpt: The idea that mental states can affect physical body chemistry and that this connection can lead to negative habit patterns is a view that is supported by some scientific research. The concept of the mind-body connection is well-established in fields such as psychology and neuroscience.

There is research that suggests that certain mental states, such as stress, can lead to the release of certain chemicals in the body that can have negative effects on physical and emotional well-being. Similarly, positive mental states, such as gratitude, can lead to the release of "feel-good" chemicals that can improve well-being.

In addition, some forms of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based therapies, are based on the idea that changing the way we think and react to certain situations can improve mental and physical health.

That being said, the specific idea that the mind turns into matter through the process of asavas is not widely accepted and is a concept that comes from Buddhism, which is not a widely accepted science perspective. This concept is a part of the Buddhist beliefs and not a general scientific viewpoint.

In summary, while the mind-body connection is a widely accepted idea, the specific concept of asavas is not widely accepted or supported by scientific research, but it's part of the Buddhist tradition.


3) Me: how could you help me become a better human being?

Chatgpt: As an AI, I can provide you with information and resources to help you improve various aspects of yourself, but ultimately it is up to you to put that information into practice and make changes in your life. Here are a few ways that I can assist you:

Provide information on self-improvement topics such as stress management, time management, communication skills, and more.

Help you access online resources such as articles, videos, and podcasts that can provide you with more information on a particular topic.

Help you set specific and measurable goals for self-improvement and assist you in creating a plan to achieve them.

Assist you in developing mindfulness and meditation practices that can help you improve focus, reduce stress, and increase self-awareness.

Provide you with quotes, sayings, or inspiration that can help you stay motivated in your self-improvement journey.

It's important to note that becoming a "better human being" is a lifelong process that requires continuous effort and reflection. It's also important to remember that everyone's journey is different and what works for one person may not work for another. I suggest you to be patient with yourself, be kind and compassionate towards yourself, and remember that it's okay to make mistakes, learn from them and keep moving forward.
4) Me: I have a 15 year meditation practice in the Goenka tradition.  What would be the best move forward from here?

Chatgpt: It sounds like you have a significant amount of experience with meditation, particularly in the Goenka tradition. As you have already developed a consistent practice, one of the best ways to move forward may be to deepen your understanding of the technique and to explore other types of meditation.

Here are a few suggestions for how to continue your meditation practice:

Refine your technique: Make sure you are practicing the technique correctly and try to refine your posture and breath control to improve your focus during meditation.

Increase the duration: Gradually increase the amount of time you spend meditating each day. This will help you to develop greater focus and concentration, and to experience deeper states of meditation.

Explore other types of meditation: Try different styles of meditation such as loving-kindness, mindfulness, and visualization. This will help you to understand the different benefits and applications of different types of meditation, and to find what works best for you.

Study the teachings of the tradition: Try to deepen your understanding of the Goenka tradition by reading books or watching videos of Goenka's teachings. This will help you to understand the philosophy behind the technique and to gain a better understanding of the practice.

Join a meditation group: Consider joining a meditation group or sangha to meditate with others and to learn from more experienced practitioners. This can also be a great way to stay motivated and to develop a sense of community.

Practice regularly: Make sure to practice regularly, even if it's just a short period of time, this will help you to maintain the benefits of the practice and to avoid backsliding.

It's important to remember that meditation is a personal journey, and that what works best for one person may not work for another. So, find what works best for you and stick to it. Also, be patient with yourself and don't expect immediate results, the benefits of meditation can be subtle and take time to manifest.
5) Me: I like to think of emotions as strong mind events accompanied by subtle physical flows of sensations. Is there any research in accord with this?

Chatgpt: There is scientific research that supports the idea that emotions are associated with both mental and physical changes. The connection between the mind and body is well-established in fields such as psychology and neuroscience.

For example, emotions have been found to activate specific areas of the brain, and to be accompanied by changes in physiological processes such as heart rate, blood pressure, and hormone levels. Research has also shown that emotions can be associated with changes in facial expression, body posture, and voice tone.

Emotions have also been found to be linked to specific patterns of neural activity and chemical changes in the body, and that the body's response to emotions can be measured through physiological markers such as heart rate, respiration, blood pressure, and skin conductance.

It is also known that emotions can be associated with subtle physical flows of sensation, such as butterflies in the stomach, a lump in the throat, or a sense of tightness in the chest. These physical sensations are known as interoception, which refers to the awareness of internal bodily sensations.

In summary, the idea that emotions are associated with both mental and physical changes is supported by scientific research. Emotions are known to be linked to specific patterns of neural activity, chemical changes in the body, and subtle physical flows of sensation.
6) Me: what's the difference between meditating with eyes open and with eyes closed on a physiological level?

Chatgpt: Meditating with your eyes open, also known as "open-eye meditation," can involve focusing on a specific object or point in front of you, such as a candle flame or a mandala. This type of meditation can help improve concentration and attention.

Meditating with your eyes closed, also known as "closed-eye meditation," can involve visualization, guided imagery, or simply allowing the mind to relax and wander. This type of meditation can help with relaxation, stress reduction, and emotional regulation.

On a physiological level, both types of meditation can lead to changes in the brain and body, such as decreased activity in the default mode network (DMN), which is associated with mind-wandering and self-referential thoughts, and increased activity in areas of the brain associated with attention and empathy. Both types of meditation can also lead to changes in the body, such as lower heart rate and blood pressure, and decreased production of stress hormones.

In summary, both open-eye and closed-eye meditation can be beneficial in different ways, and the choice of which to practice may depend on personal preference or the specific goals of the individual.

7) Me: What would you know about the complex dynamics that underlie cognition and perception?

Chatgpt: The complex dynamics that underlie cognition and perception is a very active and complex area of research in neuroscience and cognitive psychology. There are many different theories and models that attempt to explain how information is processed in the brain, how it is transformed into meaningful perceptions, and how it gives rise to conscious experience.

One influential approach to understanding the dynamics of cognition and perception is the framework of predictive coding, which suggests that the brain continuously generates and updates models of the world, and uses these models to predict incoming sensory information. This framework posits that perception is an ongoing process of hypothesis testing, in which the brain generates predictions about what sensory information it will receive, compares these predictions to the actual sensory input, and updates its models accordingly. This approach can explain many aspects of perception, including the role of context and expectation in shaping our perception of the world.

Another important area of research in cognitive and perceptual dynamics is the study of neural oscillations. These are rhythmic patterns of activity in the brain that are thought to be important for coordinating information processing across different brain regions. Different oscillatory frequencies have been linked to different cognitive processes, such as attention, working memory, and language comprehension. The complex interactions between these oscillatory patterns are thought to be important for integrating information from different sources and generating coherent perceptions and thoughts.

Overall, our understanding of the complex dynamics underlying cognition and perception is still very much a work in progress. However, with advances in brain imaging techniques and computational modeling, researchers are making rapid progress in uncovering the fundamental principles that govern these processes.

Me: Thank you! Could we think of the brain as a resonating device, and consciousness as the wavefield produced by it... Or as a wavefield totally independent but somehow connected to this bodymind?

Chatgpt: The idea of thinking about the brain as a resonating device and consciousness as the wavefield produced by it is an interesting one, and it has been proposed by some theories of consciousness. One such theory is the Global Workspace Theory, which posits that conscious experience arises from the global broadcasting of information across the brain, much like a resonating system.

According to this theory, the brain can be seen as a complex system of interconnected processing modules, each of which can contribute to the overall pattern of activity in the brain. Consciousness arises when a particular pattern of activity becomes globally broadcast across the brain, making it available for further processing and integration with other cognitive processes. In this sense, consciousness can be seen as a wavefield that emerges from the dynamic interactions between different brain regions.

However, it is important to note that the relationship between the brain and consciousness is still not fully understood, and there are many different theories and models that attempt to explain this relationship. Some theories, for example, suggest that consciousness may be a fundamental aspect of the universe, and that the brain serves as a kind of antenna or receiver that picks up on this underlying consciousness. Other theories propose that consciousness arises from the interactions between the brain and the external world, and that it is not something that can be reduced to purely neural activity.

Ultimately, the nature of consciousness is a very complex and multifaceted topic, and there is still much that is not fully understood about it. However, the idea of thinking about the brain as a resonating device and consciousness as the wavefield produced by it can provide a useful way of thinking about the complex interactions that underlie cognitive and perceptual processes.
Me: Yes, panpsychism, for example, would posit consciousness as an emergent propriety of all matter, vibrating at different rates. Or is it the other way around?

Chatgpt: Panpsychism is a philosophical view that suggests that consciousness is a fundamental and ubiquitous aspect of the universe, and that it is present in all forms of matter, not just in brains. According to panpsychism, consciousness is not an emergent property of complex systems, but rather a fundamental property of matter itself, much like mass, charge, or spin.

In this view, different forms of matter vibrate at different frequencies, which give rise to different types of conscious experiences. For example, a rock may have a very low frequency of vibration, which would correspond to a very simple and rudimentary form of consciousness, while a more complex system like the human brain would have a higher frequency of vibration and a more complex and sophisticated form of consciousness.

Panpsychism is not a widely accepted view in contemporary philosophy or science, and it is still very much a matter of debate and speculation. However, some proponents of panpsychism suggest that it offers a way of reconciling the subjective nature of consciousness with the objective nature of physical reality, by positing that consciousness is a fundamental aspect of the physical world.

Ultimately, the relationship between matter and consciousness is still a very complex and unresolved topic, and there are many different theories and perspectives on this relationship. Panpsychism is just one of many philosophical views that attempt to explain this relationship, and it remains a topic of active research and debate in philosophy and science.
8)Me: What do you know about the Goenka tradition of vipassana?

Chatgpt: The Goenka tradition of Vipassana is a form of insight meditation that was popularized by S.N. Goenka, a Burmese-Indian teacher who taught Vipassana meditation in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ba Khin. Goenka's teachings emphasize the importance of self-transformation through the systematic observation of the mind and body. The technique is taught in 10-day silent retreats, during which participants follow a strict code of discipline and meditate for up to 10 hours per day. Goenka emphasized that Vipassana is not a religion, but a method for self-improvement and spiritual development that can be practiced by people of any faith or background.
Me: what are the drawbacks and limitations of this method?

Chatgpt: The Goenka tradition of Vipassana, like any meditation technique, may not be suitable for everyone. Some people may find the strict discipline and long hours of daily meditation to be challenging or overwhelming. Additionally, the technique can be physically demanding, and may not be appropriate for individuals with certain health conditions.

There are also some criticisms of the Goenka tradition, specifically around the way the retreats are run and the nature of the organization. Some people have raised concerns about the strict adherence to traditional gender roles and the lack of transparency regarding the finances of the organization. Also, the fact that the teacher does not interact with the students during the course, could be seen as a limitation for some people.

It is worth noting that these drawbacks and limitations are specific to the Goenka tradition and may not apply to other forms of Vipassana meditation. As always, it's important to research and investigate different meditation techniques before deciding which one is right for you.

Me: Can you sum up the views of smiling stone on the dharmaoverground?

Chatgpt: I'm sorry, I am not familiar with the specific views of a person named "smiling stone" on the website "dharmaoverground." Dharmaoverground is a forum where people discuss various aspects of Buddhism, particularly in the Theravada tradition, and a wide range of views and opinions

9) Me: would you write an essay about the mysticism in Spinoza's writings

Chatgpt: Benedict de Spinoza, a Dutch philosopher of the 17th century, is known for his unique and unorthodox views on mysticism and spirituality. In his most famous work, "Ethics," Spinoza presents a pantheistic view of God, in which God and the universe are one and the same thing. This idea is central to Spinoza's philosophy, and it has important implications for his understanding of mysticism.

Spinoza's pantheism is rooted in his belief that the universe is made up of a single substance, which he calls "God or Nature." This substance is infinite and eternal, and it is the source of all that exists. According to Spinoza, the universe is not created by God, but is God itself. This means that everything that exists, including human beings, is part of God and is in some sense divine.

This pantheistic view of God has important implications for Spinoza's understanding of mysticism. For Spinoza, mysticism is not about experiencing God as a separate, transcendent being, but rather about realizing the unity of God and the self. He believed that the ultimate goal of mysticism is to achieve a state of mind in which the individual recognizes the unity of God and the self. This state is called the "intuition of the third kind," and it is characterized by the experience of a perfect and infinite joy.

In order to achieve this state, Spinoza believed that individuals must go through a process of self-purification, which involves ridding themselves of the passions and emotions that cloud the mind. This is accomplished through the use of reason and the cultivation of virtues such as humility, patience, and self-control. Once the individual has purged themselves of these passions, they are able to achieve a state of perfect understanding, in which they see the world as it truly is.

Spinoza's mysticism is also characterized by the idea of "eternal actuality." According to this idea, the universe is always in a state of complete actuality, and there is nothing that is not actual. This means that the past and future do not really exist, and that the only thing that exists is the present moment. This idea has important implications for the nature of time and for the nature of the self.

In conclusion, Spinoza's mysticism is unique and unorthodox, and it is rooted in his pantheistic view of God. According to Spinoza, mysticism is not about experiencing God as a separate, transcendent being, but rather about realizing the unity of God and the self. This state is characterized by the experience of perfect and infinite joy and it is achieved through the use of reason and self-purification. Spinoza's mysticism is a rational approach to the spiritual experience that emphasizes the unity of God and the self.

Ok I stop here. I did that on smartphone so I hope it comes out readable, and that you find some of it interesting!
​​​​​​​
with metta
smiling stone

​​​​​​​[Edited out the wakatchaka part, which is now in the next post]
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Smiling Stone, modified 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 7:21 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 7:21 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 343 Join Date: 5/10/16 Recent Posts
I did forget an interesting bit, so I paste it here (will edit the previous post):
Me: Can you describe the experience of emptiness in meditation, and differentiate it from a path attainment?

Chatgpt: Emptiness in meditation is a state of mind characterized by a sense of open spaciousness, clarity and freedom from thoughts, emotions and mental constructs. It is a state where the mind is free from the usual distractions and agitation that arise in daily life, and is often described as a peaceful and calming experience.

Emptiness in meditation is not the same as a path attainment, which refers to a specific level of spiritual development achieved in certain contemplative traditions. A path attainment is a state of mind where one has achieved a stable and deep understanding of the nature of reality, and has developed certain qualities such as compassion, wisdom and inner peace.

While the experience of emptiness in meditation can be a stepping stone towards path attainment, it is not the same as it. Emptiness is a state of mind that can be experienced during meditation, while path attainment is a more advanced and stable state of mind, that is achieved after a period of dedicated and consistent meditation practice.

For example, in Buddhism, emptiness is a key concept and is understood as the ultimate nature of reality, but it is not the same as enlightenment, which is a path attainment, it is rather one of the aspects of enlightenment.

In summary, emptiness in meditation is a state of mind characterized by a sense of openness and freedom from thoughts, emotions and mental constructs that can be experienced during meditation sessions, while path attainment is a more advanced and stable state of mind, that is achieved after a period of dedicated and consistent meditation practice, and it implies a deep understanding of reality and the development of certain spiritual qualities.
Me: Write a koan about it!

Chatgpt: A koan is a type of riddle or puzzle that is used in Zen Buddhism to help students develop insight and understanding. Here is an example of a koan about emptiness and path attainment:

"A student asked the master, 'What is the difference between emptiness and path attainment?'
The master replied, 'The sky is empty, but it holds the clouds. The mind is empty, but it holds the path.'
The student asked, 'Then, how can I find the path within the emptiness?'
The master simply smiled and said, 'The path is the emptiness, and the emptiness is the path'"

This koan is pointing to the idea that emptiness and path attainment are not separate things, but rather different aspects of the same reality. The sky is empty, but it holds the clouds, which represents the path attainment. Emptiness is not a state of nothingness but it contains everything, including the path. The mind is empty, but it holds the path, representing that the path is not something that can be found outside of oneself, but rather it is discovered within one's own mind. The student's question about how to find the path within the emptiness, is answered with the master's statement, "The path is the emptiness, and the emptiness is the path" which highlights that the path and emptiness are one and the same.
Me: Watchakatcha!

Chatgpt: I'm glad you found my response helpful. Koans are a unique and powerful tool for spiritual development and insight, and I hope my example gave you some food for thought. If you have any other questions or if there's anything else I can assist you with, please let me know.
Me: So you translated "watchatkatcha" as "I found your response helpful". How is that?

Chatgpt: I apologize for the confusion. "Watchakatcha" is not a commonly used phrase or expression, so I inferred that you were expressing satisfaction with my response based on the context of the conversation. However, I understand that it could mean something different, and I apologize for any confusion.
Please let me know if there's anything else I can help you with.
Me: I'll let others use you now..  thanks

Chatgpt: You're welcome, I'm glad I could assist you. I'll be here whenever you have more questions or need further help. Have a great day!
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 7:37 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 7:37 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 5333 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
Chatgpt: Emptiness in meditation is a state of mind characterized by a sense of open spaciousness, clarity and freedom from thoughts, emotions and mental constructs. It is a state where the mind is free from the usual distractions and agitation that arise in daily life, and is often described as a peaceful and calming experience.
​​​​​​​

More proof that there is no knowledge or understanding behind what this LLM says. It's easy to anthropomorphize AI of this nature, but it's a huge mistake to do so.
Hector L, modified 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 9:23 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 9:23 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 141 Join Date: 5/9/20 Recent Posts
Could be a description of Trekchö though
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 10:16 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 9:26 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 5333 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
Hector, have you heard of the stopped clock accuracy test?

​​​​​​​emoticon
Hector L, modified 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 9:33 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/1/23 9:33 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 141 Join Date: 5/9/20 Recent Posts
Haha I have this theory that it's ML researchers using LLMs as a model of their own mind like a map.
After all I used CNNs (AIs for vision and sound) to explore the visual and sound sense door.
LLMs can be seen as a model of the interaction of attention and memory.
There are quite a few ML researchers who are also meditators, I wouldn't be surprised if they do the same transfer learning between domains.

In terms of maps it's like

CNNs <> Jhana 1-4 material body sensations
LLMs <> Jhana 5-8 fine material body / subtle body but haven't discovered grounding to material body yet, purely imaginal

But yeah, not quite AGIs, more like bad models of human cognition but in the uncanny valley.
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:25 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:25 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Explain Buddhist Anicca concept, in verses

All things in life are subject to change,
Nothing remains the same, it's strange.
From birth to death, each moment flows,
And everything in between, it goes.

The flowers bloom, and then they wilt,
The tides they turn, and then they tilt.
The sun it rises, and then it sets,
The seasons come, and then they're met.

This truth of change is hard to grasp,
For we are creatures of the past.
We cling to what we think is real,
But everything is on the wheel.

Anicca teaches us to see,
The fleeting nature of reality.
To let go of what we think we know,
And embrace the flow of life's tableau.

For when we see the impermanence,
And let go of our need for permanence,
We find a sense of peace and ease,
And learn to live with greater degrees.

So let us seek to understand,
The teachings of this noble land.
And may we find in Anicca's sway,
A way to live each moment, come what may.
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 1:47 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:27 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Explain Buddhist Dukkha concept, in verses

Life is filled with pain and strife,
It's hard to bear, this human life.
We seek for pleasure, joy, and ease,
But suffering comes with such degrees.

Dukkha is the name we give,
To this feeling that we live.
It's not just pain, but dissatisfaction,
That plagues us with such great distraction.

We want for things that we can't have,
And cling to things that soon will pass.
We suffer from the fear of loss,
And from the pains that life does cross.

But Dukkha isn't just a curse,
It's also what helps us traverse,
The path to peace, the path to love,
The path to enlightenment, above.

For when we see the nature true,
Of Dukkha and its causes too,
We learn to let go of our desires,
And find within ourselves the fires
of wisdom, compassion, and grace,
That help us navigate this space.

So let us seek to understand,
The teachings of this noble land.
And may we find in Dukkha's grip,
A way to find a greater trip.

edit:  format issues
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:29 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:29 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Explain Buddhist Anatta concept, in verses

No-self is the Buddhist creed,
A concept hard for minds to heed.
The self, we think, is solid, real,
But in truth, it's just a wheel.

A product of the skandhas five,
The self is but a passing guise.
It comes and goes, it ebbs and flows,
Like waves upon a beach that grows.

No self is permanent or true,
It's just a label we imbue.
It's grasping causes so much strife,
Leading us down the path of life.

But when we see through this illusion,
And recognize there's no seclusion,
We find a sense of peace and calm,
And learn to live without alarm.

So let us seek to understand,
The teachings of this noble land.
And may we find in Anatta's grace,
A way to live with greater space.
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:31 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:31 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Explain Buddhist Dependent Origination concept, in verses

Everything in life is connected,
A truth that's often overlooked and neglected.
For every effect, there is a cause,
A never-ending cycle that gives us pause.

Dependent Origination is the name,
Of this interconnectedness game.
It teaches us that nothing stands alone,
Everything is connected, to the bone.

The twelve links of this cosmic chain,
Explain how suffering comes to reign.
Ignorance comes first, and then comes form,
Sensation, perception, and mental norms.

Then consciousness arises to perceive,
Which gives rise to the senses that we believe.
Contact then occurs, with what we perceive,
And craving arises, we then deceive.

Attachment follows, which leads to becoming,
And birth, which is the start of our coming.
Then old age, sickness, and finally death,
The cycle repeats with each and every breath.

But understanding this cosmic chain,
Can help us break free from suffering's bane.
For when we see the nature of Dependent Origination,
We can break free from this endless stagnation.

So let us seek to understand,
The teachings of this noble land.
And may we find in Dependent Origination's grace,
A way to break free and find our place.
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:35 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:35 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Explain Emptiness, in verses

Emptiness is a concept of great renown,
In Buddhism, it's a truth that's well known.
But what does it mean, this emptiness of things?
Let me explain with words that might sing.

All things we see, all things we know,
Are empty of an inherent, permanent glow.
They are impermanent, changing, and fluid,
Without a fixed essence, they're not rooted.

The self we think we are, so solid and real,
Is also empty, just like a dream's surreal.
It's a construct, a product of our mind,
Not a fixed entity, impossible to find.

This emptiness isn't nihilistic, it's not bleak,
It's a liberating truth, a treasure we can seek.
It frees us from clinging, from attachment and pain,
Allows us to see the world with a clear, open brain.

So when you see things, remember their empty nature,
And let go of your ego's clinging stature.
Embrace the flow, the impermanence of life,
And find freedom from all suffering and strife.
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:38 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:38 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Explain Buddhist Two Fold Emptiness concept, in verses

Two Fold Emptiness is the way,
To see the world in a brand new way.
It's the path that leads to freedom,
And helps us find our own kingdom.

Emptiness of Self is the first,
It helps us see that we're immersed,
In a world of impermanence,
Where nothing lasts, it's all a dance.

We're just a fleeting manifestation,
Of a world in constant transformation.
And when we see our own true nature,
We can live life with greater stature.

Emptiness of Phenomena is the next,
It helps us see that nothing is fixed.
The world we see is just a dream,
And things are not quite as they seem.

All things arise and pass away,
They're not permanent, they cannot stay.
So when we see this emptiness,
We can live life with greater happiness.

With Two Fold Emptiness as our guide,
We can see the world with open eyes.
And when we see our own true nature,
We can live life with greater stature.

So let us seek to understand,
The teachings of this noble land.
And may we find in Two Fold Emptiness' light,
A way to live with greater insight.
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:38 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:38 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 5333 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
ChatGPT is in high school!
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Pepe ·, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:48 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 11:46 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 736 Join Date: 9/26/18 Recent Posts
Yeah, a nice intro for teens emoticon I think that today, chat-GPT4 was launched today, check the simulated exams table:

https://openai.com/research/gpt-4 
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:28 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:05 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 5333 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
I post this link without comment  emoticon

Sam Harris Podcast - The Trouble with AI
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Smiling Stone, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:19 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:19 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 343 Join Date: 5/10/16 Recent Posts
Your link brings back to the thread...
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Chris M, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:29 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:29 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 5333 Join Date: 1/26/13 Recent Posts
Martin, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:31 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 12:31 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 914 Join Date: 4/25/20 Recent Posts
"Dependent Origination is the name,
Of this interconnectedness game."

I love this! So trashy, so high school!
Gus Castellanos, modified 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 5:27 PM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/15/23 5:27 PM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 22 Join Date: 1/2/18 Recent Posts
Describe dharma overground in verses:

In the world of meditation, a community thrives,
A place where practitioners can share their lives,
Dharma Overground is its name,
Founded by a teacher, with much acclaim.The site is a resource center, you see,
For those who seek, in the Buddhist tradition, to be,
Meditation is the focus, its practices too,
Shared experiences, insights, and questions anew.The community has a name, pragmatic dharma it's called,
Direct experience and results are the goal,
Cutting through dogma and superstition,
To the practical benefits, with precision.Increased mindfulness, emotional regulation too,
Insight into the nature of reality, to name a few,
For those seeking guidance and support,
Dharma Overground is a safe resort.Scholars and researchers, with interest keen,
In the intersection of Buddhism and mindfulness, convene,
But controversy and criticism, one must note,
Have surrounded the community, with some devotees remote.
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เอียน พิชฟอร์ด, modified 1 Year ago at 3/16/23 9:53 AM
Created 1 Year ago at 3/16/23 9:53 AM

RE: chatGPT: Best advice on the DhO?

Posts: 40 Join Date: 2/10/20 Recent Posts
One thing I like about it is that it does pretty reasonable translations of Pali, Sanskrit, Chinese, and Tibetan, which is useful for research. It can also do good summaries of suttas and other texts. I've been impressed enough to subscribe. The standard reservations apply.

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